History

History students at UM-Dearborn research a wide variety of topics, periods and areas of the world, and practice many modes of historical thinking.

At the end of their studies, history majors are able to frame and investigate questions about the actions, contexts, and meanings of earlier human lives from cultural, economic, political, and social perspectives. Producing original historical research, students locate and interpret primary sources as evidence, place their inquiries in the context of relevant historiography and broader frameworks of interpretation, and integrate varied sources in a coherent argument.

Advising

History majors should consult with an adviser before the beginning of each semester.

In addition to the major requirements, students must complete all CASL Degree Requirements.

Prerequisites to the Major

Students desiring to major in history are required to elect three of the following courses as prerequisites. The faculty strongly advises that students take these courses during their freshman or sophomore year:

HIST 101The World to 1500 CE3
HIST 102Medieval and Renaissance World3
HIST 103The World Since 1500 CE3
HIST 104Chinese Civilization3
HIST 105Japanese Society and Culture3
HIST 106An Intro to the African Past3
HIST 108Latin America:The Colonial Era3
HIST 109Latin America: The Modern Era3
HIST 111The American Past I3
HIST 112The American Past II3

Major Requirements

For a major in history, students are required to complete 28 upper level credit hours in history (HIST) from the following:

Required Courses
HIST 300The Study of History4
U.S. History (CAUS)
Select two courses from the following:6
Studies in Det. Hist & Culture
The Arts & Culture of Detroit
African American History I: 1619-1865
Early American Republic
Civil War & Reconstruction
The United States and Vietnam 1
Eng Colonies in Amer,1607-1763
American Revolution, 1763-1815
Emerg of Modern U.S.,1876-1916
Era of World Wars:1916-1946
America Since World War II: Superpower Blues
Michigan History
Comparat. American Identities
United States Economic History
America and the Middle East in the Age of Nation-States 1
History of Islam in the US
The 1960s in America
Black Intellectual History 1
Rel in Am Hist II:1865-Present
Women Leadership/Social Change
Automobile in American Life
Henry Ford and His Place
Intro to Arab American Studies
Public History in Arab Detroit
Arabs & Muslims in Media 1
Arab Americans Since 1890 1
African American History II: 1865-Present
Civil Rights Movement in Amer
American City
Women in Am-Hist Perspective
History of Industrial Technlgy 1
Modern Warfare 1
Labor in America
Immigration in America
Non-U.S. History (CANU)
Select three courses from the following:9-10
Russian Intellectual History
Imperial Russia
The Russian Revolutions
Polish History Since 1800
Poland - Study Abroad
Modern East-Central Europe
Armenia Ancient Medieval World
Armenia in the Soviet Period
Armenians in the Modern World
England: Tudors and Stuarts
Modern Britain
Late Imperial China
Traditional China
History of Modern China
Traditional Japan
Modern Japan
Medieval Society
Germany Since 1945
The European City, 1750-2000
Sex, War, and Violence
20th c European Women's Hist
The Renaissance
The Reformation Era: 1500-1648
The Age of Revolution in Europe and the World
Europe in Age of Imp:1815-1914
20th-Century Europe, 1890-1945
The Contmp World, 1945-Present
Women&Islam Mid East to 1900
Ottoman Empire in 19th Century
Germany Before Hitler
West Africa Since 1800
The Middle East 570 to 1800 CE
Modern Middle East, 1918-1945
Modern Middle East, 1945-1991
Lebanon in Modern Middle East
The United States and Vietnam 1
Eur and Intern'l Econ History
America and the Middle East in the Age of Nation-States 1
Black Intellectual History 1
History of Industrial Technlgy 1
Arabs & Muslims in Media 1
Arab Americans Since 1890 1
Bible in History
Inside-Out Reading Prison Narr
Modern Warfare 1
Intell Hist of Modern Europe
Modern France
Aspects of the Holocaust
Nazi Germany
Capstone
Select 3-4 credit hours of courses at the 400 or 4000 level. 23-4
Upper Level Electives in History
Select 6-8 credit hours any upper level HIST6-8
Portfolio
Approval required by the History faculty advisor. 3
Cognates
6-8 credit hours upper level courses in African and African American Studies (AAAS), American Studies (AMST), Anthropology (ANTH), Arab American Studies (AAST), Arabic (ARBC), Art History (ARTH), Communications (COMM), Economics (ECON), English (ENGL), French (FREN), Geography (GEOG), German (GER), Humanities (HUM), Linguistics (LING), Music History (MHIS), Philosophy (PHIL), Political Science (POL), Psychology (PSYC), Religious Studies (RELS), Spanish (SPAN), Sociology (SOC), Urban and Regional Studies (URS), and Women and Gender Studies (WGST). 6-8
Total Credit Hours34-40
1

May count as U.S. or Non U.S., but not both.

2

May include HIST 4999 (Senior Research Seminar),HIST 498 (Senior Honors Thesis), HIST 499 (Advanced Independent Studies in History), and any of the 400 or 4000 level advanced seminar courses.

3

Completion of an electronic history portfolio is required. Please see the History Portfolio page for more information.

Notes:

  1. At least 15 of the 28 upper level credit hours in history (HIST) must be elected at UM-Dearborn.
  2.  A maximum of 3 hours of History Internship (HIST 3085) may count in the major. 

Portfolio

In order to graduate with a degree in history, students must compile an electronic portfolio of papers written in history courses. The History Portfolio is an archive of at least four significant papers from upper-division history courses taken at UM-Dearborn. It must include the HIST 300 paper and at least one paper from a capstone (400/4000 level) course, along with a capstone reflection essay that highlights those papers that best demonstrate mastery of learning outcomes for history majors.

Minor or Integrative Studies Concentration Requirements

A minor or concentration consists of 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in history (HIST).

  • A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required for the minor/concentration. The GPA is based on all coursework required within the minor (excluding prerequisites).
  • A minimum of 9 credits must be completed at UM-Dearborn for a 12 credit minor/concentration.
  • A minimum of 12 credits must be completed at UM-Dearborn for a 15 or more credit minor/concentration.
  • Courses within a minor/concentration cannot be taken as Pass/Fail (P/F)
  • Only 3 credit hours of independent study or internship may be used to fulfill the requirements for a 12 credit hour minor/concentration.  Only 6 credit hours of such credit may be used in a 15 or more credit hour minor/concentration.
  • Minors requiring 12 credits may share one course with a major. Minors requiring 15 credits or more may share two courses with a major. This does not apply to concentrations for the Integrative Studies major.

Learning Goals

1. Conceptual: Demonstrate knowledge of the fundamental questions, concepts, and conventions that distinguish the discipline of history.

  • Demonstrate an understanding of causation, historical context, and change over time in societies and institutions.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the significance of diverse groups in the context of time and place.

2. Primary Source Analysis: Distinguish and critically engage with primary sources.

  • Demonstrate familiarity with different types of primary sources (written sources, art, material artifacts, interviews, etc.)
  • Demonstrate ability to ask questions (who, when, where, and why?) that are critical in the process of contextualizing and analyzing primary sources.
  • Demonstrate the ability to construct understandings of historical processes based on critical analysis of primary sources.

3. Secondary Source Analysis: Understand, analyze, and critically evaluate secondary sources.

  • Identify and articulate a secondary source’s argument and assess its evidence.
  • Show familiarity with historiography on various historical topics.
  • Recognize and critique different approaches to historical inquiry.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the relationships between historical interpretations. This includes demonstrating an awareness of the implications of different interpretations, and making sophisticated comparisons between interpretations.

4. Research: Employ historical research methodologies and create a historical account from varied sources.

  • Develop a historical question, and locate and interpret primary sources as evidence.
  • Use library and electronic resources to find appropriate sources.
  • Demonstrate familiarity with various methodologies (e.g. archival research, oral history)
  • Place a historical inquiry in the context of relevant historiography and/or broader frameworks of interpretation.
  • Integrate varied sources in a coherent historical argument (thesis).
  • Employ standard citation styles, especially Chicago Style/Turabian Style (footnotes or endnotes).

5. Communication: Present historical information and arguments clearly and properly.

  • Communicate complex historical ideas through clear and persuasive writing.
  • Communicate historical information and ideas in effective public presentations.
  • Demonstrate the ability to write for a discipline-specific audience by integrating disciplinary concepts in writing and following conventions of history writing.
  • Communicate original perspectives on the past through the presentation of complex sources and arguments.

HIST 101     The World to 1500 CE     3 Credit Hours

This course is an introductory survey of world history from the close of the Ice Age to the begnnings of globalization, ca. 1500 CE. We will compare world civilizations and examine the connections among them.

HIST 102     Medieval and Renaissance World     3 Credit Hours

An introductory survey of world civilizations from c.1000 CE to 1750 CE. The course explores global patterns of trade, technology and expansion, the role of geography, climate and catastrophe in shaping human societies, and the relationship between warfare and the rise of the nation state. Topics include the rediscovery of classical traditions in the Renaissance, the rise of the Gunpowder Empires in Asia and the Middle East, and cross-cultural interactions between the European West and the American `New World'.

HIST 103     The World Since 1500 CE     3 Credit Hours

This course is survey of world history since 1500 CE. It emphasizes global social, political and economic trends, including the impact of nationalism, imperialism, industrialization, dictatorships, and democratic institutions.

HIST 106     An Intro to the African Past     3 Credit Hours

Survey of the social, economic, political, intellectual and cultural heritage of the African peoples from prehistory to the present. Emphasis on internal dynamics of African society through five millennia, as well as the impact of external forces on African life. Themes of particular interest: the roots of African culture, the trans-Atlantic slave trade and the African diaspora in the New World, the European Conquest, and the character of the colonial order and the ongoing struggle to end the legacy of alien domination. (YR).

HIST 111     The American Past I     3 Credit Hours

A survey of the economic, social, and political developments in America from the colonial era to the Civil War.

HIST 112     The American Past II     3 Credit Hours

A survey of the economic, social, and political developments in America from the conclusion of the Civil War through the present.

HIST 300     The Study of History     4 Credit Hours

A study of the theories of historical analysis, styles of historical writing, and approaches to historical research. For history majors who should elect it as soon as they declare their concentration. (F,W).

Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or HIST 102 or HIST 103 or HIST 104 or HIST 105 or HIST 111 or HIST 112 or HIST 113 or HIST 114

HIST 304     Studies in Det. Hist & Culture     3 Credit Hours

This interdisciplinary course explores the political, social, and cultural histroy of Detroit by examining ways various groups and classes have interacted with and been shaped by structures of power and influence. The course highlights trade and commerce, newcomers, and the influence of organizations and institutions within the contexts of labor, race, ethnic, and religous histories and current affairs, and examines how these fit into the evolution of Detroit from the 19th century to the present. Where pertinent the influence of national and international movements included.

HIST 305     The Arts & Culture of Detroit     3 Credit Hours

This interdisciplinary course explores the modern and contemporary cultural history of Detroit, examining the ways in which various population groups have been creative from the nineteenth century to the present. The course highlights the work of architects, designers, photographers, visual artists, poets, and musicians, and situates them in the broader cultural context of American art and history. (OC).

HIST 3085     History Internship     3 to 6 Credit Hours

The internship offers students experience in types of work available to liberal arts graduates. Regular meetings between the Internship Coordinator and the intern are required. Students can count up to 3 credits of History Internship (HIST 3085) as an upper-level history course in the degree requirements for the history major.

HIST 309     The Russian Revolutions     3 Credit Hours

Provides a broad overview of Russian history leading to the Russian revolutions of 1917, and a more detailed analysis of the revolutions of 1905 and 1917 and the subsequent development of the Soviet Union up to the present. Roots of present Soviet behavior will be sought in Russia's past. (AY).

HIST 3121     Polish History Since 1800     4 Credit Hours

This class offers students a chance to study 19th and 20th century Polish history. We look at how the most prominent ideals of what it means to be Polish – framed as a discussion between the Romantics and Positivists; the Fighters/Insurgents and Realists; the Old and New – affected the perceptions on honor, heroism, and Polish patriotism. A critical evaluation of these models leads us to evaluate the most important historical events in the last two centuries of Polish history – a country with impressive history of openness and multiculturalism as well as grim chapters of xenophobia. Centered on the role of individuals in shaping history, this class also reflects on the identity of Poles – citizens of a country located at the cross-roads of Eastern and Western Europe.

HIST 3122     Poland - Study Abroad     3 Credit Hours

This is an interdisciplinary course led in major Polish cities. The trip begins in Kraków, and then continues to Warsaw, Łódź, and Gdańsk. While there, the class will explore various and often conflicting, aspects of Polish and Polish-Jewish history. Visits to these historical sites will be accompanied by appropriate primary and secondary source readings and documents. During the course of the trip, students are expected to actively participate in ten scheduled seminar meetings as well as numerous lectures and workshops with local historians. While on the trip, students will have the opportunity to experience Polish culture; traveling on local transportation, sleeping in local hostels and hotels and eating in local cafeterias and various eateries.

HIST 3125     Modern East-Central Europe     3 Credit Hours

This class offers introductory knowledge about the history of 19th and 20th century East-Central Europe -- often called the lands-in-between -- in particular Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Romania. It helps us understand major European phenomena from the perspective of smaller European states. We will focus on important historical moments, ideologies, and concepts that formed the area and affected the local identities.

HIST 3130     Armenia Ancient Medieval World     3 Credit Hours

The course is a general survey of Armenian history and culture from the pre-historic period to the early sixteenth century, with emphasis on Armenia’s political, economic and cultural interrelationships with other countries and peoples in the Near and Middle East, Europe and Central Asia. The course analyzes how the major political and demographic shifts in world history impacted Armenia and the Armenians. Each era of Armenia history is discussed in terms of developments in the surrounding countries. Attention is given to politics, international relations, trade, religion, literature, art, and architecture.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore or Junior or Senior

HIST 3131     Armenia in the Soviet Period     3 Credit Hours

HIST 3131 will study the history of the Soviet Republic of Armenia, when it was ruled by Communists and was part of the USSR in 1920-1991. It will chronicle the broad political, economic, social and cultural developments throughout 70 years of Soviet history and will then study in detail how these developments affected life in Armenia, one the fifteen union republics of the USSR, and relations between Soviet Armenia and the Armenian Diaspora outside the USSR, including the Armenian American community. The course will help students to better understand the Soviet experience by focusing on developments not only in the political center in Moscow, but in the southernmost and territorially the smallest of all the Soviet republics. It will also help students to better comprehend the historical background to some contemporary developments in Transcaucasia (the South Caucasus), Turkey, Iran and the Arab states of Western Asia.

HIST 3132     Armenians in the Modern World     3 Credit Hours

The course is a general survey of Armenian history and culture from the early sixteenth century to the present, with emphasis on political, economic and cultural interrelationships with other countries and peoples in the Near and Middle East, Europe and the Americas. The course analyzes how the major political shifts in world history impacted Armenia and the Armenians. Therefore, each era of Armenian history covered in this course is discussed in terms of developments worldwide and especially in the surrounding countries. Studying Armenia and the Armenian people gives students an understanding of what happens to, in, and around small countries as they find themselves in a regularly changing international political environment. Attention is given to politics, international relations, economics, religion, literature, art, and architecture. Modern Armenian history and culture is discussed in relation to Ottoman, Iranian, Russian, West European, North America, and other civilizations.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore or Junior or Senior

HIST 315     Modern Britain     3 Credit Hours

Course focuses on Great Britain from the time of the Industrial Revolution to the present. Major problems considered are industrialization, the British empire and its disintegration, the democratization of British political life, the creation of the welfare state, and Britain's role in the contemporary world. (AY).

HIST 316     African American History I: 1619-1865     3 Credit Hours

This course traces the experience of African Americans from their first landing in Virginia in 1619 through slavery and the Civil War. Emphasis will be placed on the origins of racism, the development of the slave system in the United States and the historical developments that led to the Civil War. (YR).

HIST 318     Early American Republic     3 Credit Hours

This course examines the history of the United States from the ratification of the Federal Constitution through the Presidency of Andrew Jackson. Particular attention is given to the process of political party formation, the impact of the "market revolution" upon life, the origins and ramifications of the Second Great Awakening, the antebellum reform movements, and slavery. (YR).

HIST 319     Civil War & Reconstruction     3 Credit Hours

This course examines America's pivotal middle period, a period of rising sectional tensions, bloody civil war, and protracted debate about the promise and limits of equality in the United States. Among the topics covered are the meaning of freedom in antebellum America, territorial expansion and the development of slavery as a political issue, the collapse of the national party system and the secession crisis, the meaning of the American Civil War, and the postwar settlement of reconstruction. (YR).

HIST 3211     Untold Caribbean: Field Course     3 Credit Hours

Full Course Title: Dark History and Untold Stories: Field Class in Caribbean Historical Archaeology. Field Class: involves international travel and required costs in addition to tuition. This class explores the story behind Caribbean "paradise." We use the analytical methods of historical archaeology to "read" sites of enslavement and resistance, as well as modern museum interpretations of Caribbean heritage, and engage in the production of new archaeological knowledge through excavation. We will ask how negative or "dark" history should be remembered, what life was like on Caribbean plantations, and how histories of slavery are relevant now. Throughout, we will examine how archaeology can tell the untold stories of the many people-black, white, free, and enslaved-who never made it into the history books. We will also contribute new voices with a "mini-field session" of archaeological excavation: students can gain a glimpse into scientific archaeology, and get to try out fieldwork to see if they would gain from a full field school. (S,OC)

HIST 331     The Reformation Era: 1500-1648     2 to 3 Credit Hours

A study of the nature, course, and impact of the Protestant Reformation in Europe, Humanism, the Counter-Reformation, and the cultural and social implications of Protestantism also receive attention. (YR).

HIST 333     The Age of Revolution in Europe and the World     3 Credit Hours

This course examines revolution in an era of global imperialism, considering connections and drawing comparisons among world revolutions in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. (AY).

HIST 334     Europe in Age of Imp:1815-1914     3 Credit Hours

Europe in the age of nationalism, industrialism, imperialism, and democracy; background and origins of World War I. (YR).

HIST 335     20th-Century Europe, 1890-1945     3 Credit Hours

Europe before, during, and after World War I; the rise of communism and fascism; World War II. (AY).

HIST 336     The Contmp World, 1945-Present     3 Credit Hours

The post-war world, U.S.-Soviet rivalry, European/Japanese renaissance, the Chinese Revolution; decolonization and the emergence of the Third World. (OC).

HIST 3368     Germany Since 1945     3 Credit Hours

This course covers the history of Germany since World War II. It examines 1) the postwar period and the legacy of Allied occupation; 2) the process by which Germany was divided and the period of its division, tracing the histories and divergent characters of East and West Germany; 3) the different ways in which both the Cold War context and the legacy of the Third Reich shaped the German experience of twentieth-century revolutions of society, culture, and sexuality; 4) Germany's re-unification after 1989; and, finally, 5) the subsequent challenges in identifying a newly united but increasingly multicultural Germany's place in a unified Europe, focusing on issues of immigration, national identity, and citizenship.

HIST 337     Islamic Movemnts Mid East Hist     3 Credit Hours

Will compare several Islamic movements in Middle Eastern history, starting with the rise of Islam in Mecca and Medina. Later impulses toward Islamic revival all looked back to the first movement, and hoped to capture both its spirit and its success. With this as background, the course will move to address two questions: How did later Islamic movements understand the history of the rise of Islam? How have later Islamic movements had to adapt their methods and their ideology to different historical circumstances? (AY).

HIST 338     Women&Islam Mid East to 1900     3 Credit Hours

This course covers the historical development of Islam’s normative stance towards women and gender roles in the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the earliest stirrings of feminist activism.

HIST 3380     The European City, 1750-2000     3 Credit Hours

As a novel form of social and spatial organization, the rise of the modern industrial city transformed the European landscape. This course tracks the growth and development of the city in modern Europe, focusing particularly on London, Paris and Berlin. The course considers the physical landscape of the industrial city and the infrastructural challenges of rapid urbanization, political revolution, the exercise of political power and social control in urban space, as well as intellectual and artistic responses to the urban environment. (AY).

HIST 3385     Sex, War, and Violence     3 Credit Hours

Full Title: Sex, War, and Violence: Gender and Sexuality in the 20th Century European History. This course centers the often overlooked role of gender and sexuality in the 20th century European mobilizations of state violence such as the Holocaust, Armenian Genocide, and conflicts in the former Yugoslavia. It emphasizes the clashes that occured between gains in gender and sexual rights during the century and projects of state violence that were frequently aimed at dismantling these gains. Attention is paid to the intersection of race, class, religion and gender in the (re)construction of new gender and sexual heiarchies in conflict and post-conflict contexts in the region. (OC)

HIST 339     Ottoman Empire in 19th Century     3 Credit Hours

The course is general survey of the history of the Ottoman Empire from the treaty of Kucuk Kaynarca in 1774 until the abolition of the caliphate in 1924. The course will examine such topics as modernization; imperialism; the rise of ethnic nationalisms among the empire?s Christian and Muslim subjects; decocracy; ideologies like Ottomanism, pan-Islamism, Islamic modernism, and pan-Turkism; and changing ideas about gender.

HIST 343     Germany Before Hitler     3 Credit Hours

This course considers the history of Germany in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Topics covered include the changing nature of German national identity, the creation and fall of the German Empire, colonialism, immigration, World War I, and the Weimar Republic. (AY).

HIST 345     West Africa Since 1800     3 Credit Hours

A history of the West African peoples since 1800, which focuses on their unique cultural heritage. Themes include: West Africa before the advent of alien domination, the European Conquest, West Africa under the Colonial regimes, and the liquidation of colonial rule and the reassertion of West African independence. (AY).

HIST 3502     The Middle East 570 to 1800 CE     3 Credit Hours

This course covers the social and political history of the Middle East from the rise of Islam through several key transformations to 1800. We will examine the Middle East as the center of caliphal empires, as a place of political fragmentation, as a home to increasingly diverse ethnic and religious groups, as a region within an expanding Islamic world, and as the domain of the three so-called “gunpower empires” (the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal dynasties). (YR)

Prerequisite(s): COMP 106 or Composition Placement Score with a score of 40 or Composition Placement Score with a score of 107

HIST 3511     Modern Middle East, 1918-1945     3 Credit Hours

This course surveys the history of major political events and social changes in the Middle East from 1918 to 1945. Among the topics covered are the struggle of Arab States for independence, the rise of Kemalism, and the rise of the Pahlavi Dynasty.

Prerequisite(s): COMP 106 or COMP 220 or COMP 270 or COMP 280 or Composition Placement Score with a score of 40 or Composition Placement Score with a score of 107

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore or Junior or Senior

HIST 3512     Modern Middle East, 1945-1991     3 Credit Hours

This course surveys the history of major political events and social changes in the Middle East from 1945 to 1991. Among the topics covered are the "Arab Cold War," the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the struggle for democracy, and the resurgence of "Islamist" politics.

Prerequisite(s): COMP 106 or COMP 220 or COMP 270 or COMP 280 or Composition Placement Score with a score of 40 or Composition Placement Score with a score of 107

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore or Junior or Senior

HIST 3520     Lebanon in Modern Middle East     3 Credit Hours

HIST 3520 studies the modern history of Lebanon and the country's involvement in broader Arab and Middle Eastern politics from the period whenLebanon's modern boundaries were established in 1920 to 2005 when Syrian troops were forced to leave the country. The course focuses on the relations of the Lebanese state, its various ethno-confessional communities and political groupings with the Great Powers like France, the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union and the United States of America, as well as with the influential Arab states in the region, in particular Egypt, Syria, Saudi Arabia and Iraq. Particular attention is paid to the impact of the Arab-Israeli conflict and the presence of Palestinian refugees on internal Lebanese politics. The course also analyzes the diverse, sometimes contrasting, visions among Lebanon's various local elites towards the country's place in the region and the world and how these visions underwent change in light of evolving internal social and external political developments. (YR)

HIST 354     The United States and Vietnam     3 Credit Hours

The Vietnam War was a major turning point in U.S. history. This course focuses on French rule in Indo-China; U.S. interests in the region; U.S. involvement after 1945; the military, economic, and social nature of that intervention; and the consequences of the war. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): COMP 106 or COMP 270 or COMP 280

HIST 355     Eng Colonies in Amer,1607-1763     3 Credit Hours

European expansion into North America; colonial societies, ideas, and institutions; imperial policy and administration, and accompanying changes in Amerindian and African cultures, and New World ecologies. (YR).

HIST 356     American Revolution, 1763-1815     3 Credit Hours

The causes, character, and consequences of the American Revolution, and the shaping of a new nation through the War of 1812. (YR).

HIST 358     Emerg of Modern U.S.,1876-1916     3 Credit Hours

An intensive study of the history of the United States from the end of Reconstruction to America's entry into World War I. Particular attention is paid to the social, economic, and intellectual aspects of the period and to the origins of 20th-century America. (OC).

HIST 359     Era of World Wars:1916-1946     3 Credit Hours

An intensive study of the history of the United States from 1916 to 1946. Topics include World War I and its aftermath, the Depression, the New Deal, World War II, and post-war settlements and problems. (AY).

Prerequisite(s): COMP 106 or COMP 220 or COMP 270 or COMP 280

HIST 360     America Since World War II: Superpower Blues     3 Credit Hours

This course focuses on the period from the end of World War II through the early twenty-first century and covers political, social, cultural, foreign policy, and economic history. Particular attention is given to the Cold War, civil rights movements, and the problems of contemporary America. (AY).

Prerequisite(s): COMP 106 or COMP 270 or COMP 280

HIST 3601     Michigan History     3 Credit Hours

This course covers some of the major trends and developments in the history of the state of Michigan from its aboriginal past to the present day. The course will focus upon placing the state's history within a broader national and international context and will focus upon such topics as aboriginal settlement and culture, colonization, American settlement and statehood, industrialization, immigration and political development. (YR)

HIST 3602     Comparat. American Identities     3 Credit Hours

This course will confront and complicate the following key questions: what does it mean to be an American? What is American culture? Participants in this course will respond to the questions central to the American Studies field by reading and discussing historical, sociological, literary, artistic, material culture, political, economic, and other sources. Students will use this interdisciplinary study to examine the multiple identities of Americans - as determined by factors such as gender, race, class, ethnicity, and religion. While emphasizing the diversity of American culture, participants will consider some core values and ideas uniting America both in historical and contemporary society. Students will be invited to seek out and share fresh narratives of the American experience.

Prerequisite(s): COMP 106 or Composition Placement Score with a score of 40 or Composition Placement Score with a score of 107 or COMP 220 or COMP 270 or COMP 280

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

HIST 361     United States Economic History     3 Credit Hours

A survey of the processes of development of the United States economy, their social implications, and the sources of today's economic problems. (F).

Prerequisite(s): ECON 201 or ECON 202

HIST 362     Eur and Intern'l Econ History     3 Credit Hours

A survey of the processes of industrialization in the major non-American industrial economies, with a focus on their relevance and implications. (AY).

Prerequisite(s): ECON 201 or ECON 202

HIST 3632     America and the Middle East in the Age of Nation-States     3 Credit Hours

This course will examine the expanding role of the United States in the Middle East from the aftermath of World War I through 21st Century attempts to reduce America’s “footprint” in the region. This is a complex history of nation-states emerging from the disruptions of European imperialism only to be embroiled in the Cold War, the “War on Terror”and the uneven impacts of globalized trade and energy markets dominated by influence of the United States. Each society in the Middle East has had to embrace, resist, or co-copt American power as part of managing even the most local of modern challenges. We will compare key episodes that illustrate this range of responses. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): COMP 106 or COMP 220 or COMP 270 or COMP 280

HIST 3634     History of Islam in the US     3 Credit Hours

This course traces the long history of Islam and of Muslims in the United States (1730s-present), paying careful attention to the interaction among Muslims across the dividing lines of race, gender, immigrant generations, sect, political orientation, and class, and between Muslims and other Americans.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Sophomore or Junior or Senior or Graduate

HIST 3635     The 1960s in America     3 Credit Hours

This course aims to interweave the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, the student movements, the women's movement, and other developments of the period to place them in an historical context of a complicated era of change. The course compels students to critically evaluate social movements, political developments, cultural trends, and foreign policies by close examination of primary documents as well as critical evaluations of the various ways that scholars have interpreted the period. (AY).

Prerequisite(s): COMP 106 or COMP 270 or COMP 280

HIST 3640     Black Intellectual History     3 Credit Hours

Full Course Title: Black Intellectual History: From Africa to the Diaspora This course will bridge thinkers in Africa and the African Diaspora, i.e., North America, the Caribbean, and South America. It examines African and Diasporic intellectual movements from Ancient Egypt and Ethiopia to the present. Authors studied will include C.L.R. James, Frederick Douglass, Mary McLeod Bethune, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Julius Nyerere, David Walker, Nelson Mandela, W.E.B. DuBois, Franz Fanon, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Cornel West. (YR)

HIST 3651     Women Leadership/Social Change     3 Credit Hours

The purpose of this seminar is to examine women's leadership in movements for social change. We will approach this topic through the study of historical examples, drawn primarily from the twentieth-century United States, and including movements for economic justice, race relations, sexual identity, peace, gender equality, public health, and social welfare. HIST 112 and WGST/ANTH/HUM/SOC/PSYC 303 recommended as prerequisites. (W)

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

HIST 3665     Automobile in American Life     3 Credit Hours

The course will explore a wide array of distinct, though interconnected, subjects such as: the manufacturing, engineering and design of the automobile and its relation to industrial and technological developments and consumer trends; the automobile's role in America's industrial growth and the impact that industrialization had upon American society; the automobile's role in urbanization and urban sprawl; the mass marketing of the automobile and its connection to broader social constructions of class, race, and gender; the environmental impact of the automobile; and the automobile's use and meaning as a cultural symbol and its relation to the American identity. Through the use of diverse mediums such as personal recollections, popular music, film, photographs, advertisements, automobile ephemera, literature, poetry and more traditional written sources the course will examine America's ongoing fascination with the automobile. (OC)

HIST 3671     Intro to Arab American Studies     3 Credit Hours

This course explores the local, national, and global conditions through which Arab American identity and its alternatives take shape. It introduces students to humanities and social science approaches to the field of Arab American Studies.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore or Junior or Senior

HIST 3672     Public History in Arab Detroit     3 Credit Hours

Full Title: Public History in Arab Detroit. This course explores the field of public humanities work while providing a topical focus on metro-Detroit based Arab American history and culture. Roughly half of the course will be used to explore different approaches to public humanities work undertaken by scholars. The second half of the course will provide the historical and social context for understanding a particular research question to be examined jointly by the instructor, students, and a local cultural institution. Students will engage in intensive research and work with a cultural institution to represent their findings to the public. Students cannot receive credit for both AAST 3151 and HIST 3672. (W).

HIST 3673     Arabs & Muslims in Media     3 Credit Hours

This course examines how perception of Arabs and Muslims took shape in the U.S. from the late nineteenth century through the present. Using historical developments as a conduit, we explore the treatment of Arabs and Muslims in news outlets, print media, film, and T.V. productions. For example, we analyze the motivation, plot construction, casting, and content of big budget Hollywood movies for patterns of sterotypes and representations/misrepresentations. (F,AY)

HIST 3676     Arab Americans Since 1890     3 Credit Hours

This is a survey of immigration from the Arab Middle East from 1890 to the present. Readings from available scholarship, discussions, and reports facilitate exploring the Arabic-speaking immigrants’ early and recent experiences as art of U.S. society, including settlement, work, worship, military service, leisure, intellectual life, and primary and formal affiliations across the U.S.

HIST 368     African American History II: 1865-Present     3 Credit Hours

The history of blacks in America is traced from the Reconstruction era and the rise of Jim Crow segregation to the Civil Rights movement of the 1960's and the current period. Special attention is paid to the migration of blacks to the north and the social-economic situation which they encountered there. (AY).

HIST 369     Civil Rights Movement in Amer     3 Credit Hours

A survey of race relations and civil rights activity from the late 19th century to the present. The principal focus, however, is on the period since World War II, especially on the mass-based Southern civil rights movement (1955-1965) and the various policy debates and initiatives of the past thirty years, most notably affirmative action and busing. We also examine critiques of non-violence and integrationism. (AY).

HIST 3695     American City     3 Credit Hours

This course examines the development of urban America from the European-style port cities of the colonial period through the edge cities of today. The bulk of the course will focus on the late 19th and 20th century urban environment with an eye towards understanding the diverse residents, cultures, economies, and geographies that have shaped American cities. We will cover everything from developments in transportation, architecture, business, and technology to immigration, politics, and urban culture. Broad concerns and constituencies have shaped the urban public sphere, the physical development of cities and the experience of living as an urbanite and, consequently, they will receive much of our attention. American patterns of development will then be placed in context with those of other nations and cultures. (AY).

HIST 370     Women in Am-Hist Perspective     3 Credit Hours

A survey of women's role in American society from colonial times to the present, emphasizing both change and continuity in women's experience. (YR).

HIST 374     Hist of Industrial Technology     3 Credit Hours

Focusing on western Europe and the United States since the Industrial Revolution, this course will examine the history of manufacturing technologies and will include the following topics: mechanization and the rise of the factory; mass production; the process of innovation; design and diffusion of new technologies; technologies; technology and the changing nature of work; automation and lean production systems. Through readings, class discussions, and examination of artifacts (actual tools and machines), students will consider the central role played by technology in the making of modern society. (OC).

HIST 375     Heterodox Economics     3 Credit Hours

This course introduces students to alternative perspectives on economic theory and method. These alternatives include: Post Keynesian, Marxian and radical political economics, Austrian and feminist economics. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): ECON 201 or ECON 202 or ECON 2001

HIST 3750     Modern Warfare     3 Credit Hours

A chronological overview of the major military conflicts occurring between 1775 and 2001, with an emphasis on the technological, political, international and social changes that shaped the course of modern warfare. Designed to explore the connections between "total war," the rise of mass society and the relationship between modern warfare, revoluction and decolonization. (OC).

HIST 384     Immigration in America     3 Credit Hours

This course examines immigration to the United States from the early nineteenth century to the present. Topics covered include the economic and social impact of immigration on the host society, and challenges of adjustment experienced by immigrant populations. Readings and supporting activities address social constructions of race and ethnicities, nativism, the right to citizenship, immigrant labor, and the assimilation/acculturation theories from Anglo conformity to multiculturalism. (AY).

HIST 385     Modern France     3 Credit Hours

A history of France from the French Revolution to the present. The major emphasis is on the political evolution of France with some attention to social and economic development. (AY).

HIST 387     Aspects of the Holocaust     3 Credit Hours

A survey of how and why millions of Jews, Gypsies, Slavs, and political and "racial" enemies of the Reich were so quickly and determinedly slaughtered. (YR).

HIST 389     Nazi Germany     3 Credit Hours

History of National Socialism, its goals and structure. Also addressed are the nature of the dictatorship; the role of the historian in interpreting the era and the use and evaluation of historical documents. (YR).

HIST 390     Topics in History     3 Credit Hours

Problems and issues in selected areas of history. Title as listed in Schedule of Classes changes according to content. Course may be repeated for credit when specific topics differ. (OC).

HIST 390O     Topics in History     3 Credit Hours

Topic: The Native American Past. This course introduces students to the long and rich history of America's First Peoples from earliest times to the present. Although the topics covered in class will be wide-ranging, the course emphasizes certain unifying themes: the diversity of indigenous peoples and cultures; the agency of First Peoples; the political, economic, and cultural dimensions of European/Indian accommodation and resistance; the evolution of government Indian polices and Native American responses to them; and contemporary issues confronting native peoples. The course examines the Native American Past from native people's perspectives, by including the unfamiliar voices of those peoples in more familiar accounts of America's past, and by introducing students to ways of studying neglected parts of the past and to some of the varied ways that historians (both Native and non-Native) have interpreted the Native American past.

HIST 391     Topics in History     3 Credit Hours

Examination of problems and issues in selected areas of history. Title as listed in Schedule of Classes will change according to content. Course may be repeated for credit when specific topics differ. (OC).

HIST 398     Independent Studies in History     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Readings or analytical assignments in history in accordance with the needs and interests of those enrolled and agreed upon by the student and instructor. (OC).

HIST 399     Independent Studies in History     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Readings or analytical assignments in history in accordance with the needs and interests of those enrolled as agreed upon by the student and instructor. (F,W).

HIST 4200     History and Trauma     3 Credit Hours

This research seminar focuses on the key problems related to the concept of trauma and history. It covers in-depth examples of historical events, such as genocides or natural and man-made disasters that affected societies in a deeply traumatic way. While analyzing the nature of these events, we also ask about the ways individuals and societies remember, how various generations deal with the difficult past, and what strategies they employ as a response. We ask about the sociological and cultural significance of memory and oblivion; suffering and heroism; repression and any sense of guilt. In addition to examining various repercussions of a difficult past, we also ask about how historians approach the questions of historical trauma – what questions they ask, what sources they use, and which tools allow them to connect the complex past with the present. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): HIST 300

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HIST 4401     Seminar: African Diaspora     3 Credit Hours

Research seminar on the history of the African Diaspora in the Atlantic World. This course covers examples of classic texts in the field, as well as significant new scholarship, with an emphasis on critical reading, analysis, and the development of an independent research project. Students gain a deeper understanding of the significance of the African Diaspora in the New World, derived from lectures and discussions providing an overview of this subject, as well as the micro views gleaned from sharing classroom presentation about students’ individual research topics. The graduate version of this course includes weightier readings and assignments, with a research paper for potential publication.

Prerequisite(s): HIST 300 or AAAS 275 or HIST 345 or AAAS 345

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore or Graduate

HIST 4515     Culture& Hist. in Mod. Iran     4 Credit Hours

Alongside the most influential academic studies of Iran, this course uses cultural sources (such as literature and film) as windows on the pivotal social and political movements in Iranian history since 1800. This study of cultural change factors in cultural debates inside Iran, the growth of the Iranian Diaspora, and the increased presence of Iranian culture in electronic media. Additional assignments distinguish the graduate version of this course from the undergraduate version. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): (HIST 101 or HIST 103) and (COMP 106 or COMP 220 or COMP 270 or COMP 280) and (HIST 337 or HIST 338 or HIST 339 or HIST 3130 or HIST 3132 or HIST 3502 or HIST 3511 or HIST 3512 or HIST 3520 or HIST 3632 or HIST 4505 or AAST 3150 or AAST 3151 or AAST 3634 or AAST 3673 or AAST 3676 or AAST 373 or AAST 381 or AAST 4676 or AAST 4677 or AAST 4678 or AAST 473 or ANTH 373 or ARBC 301 or ARBC 302 or ARBC 305 or ARBC 331 or ARBC 332 or ARBC 350 or ARBC 351 or ARBC 390 or ARTH 384 or ARTH 385 or COMM 430 or ECON 444 or GLOC 301 or PHIL 306 or POL 385) or HIST 300

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HIST 465     The Family in History     3 Credit Hours

An analysis of the emergence of the modern family from the 16th century to the present with focus on the history of childrearing, family size and structure, intra-familial and inter-generational relationships and population patterns. (OC).

HIST 4650     Sem in US Women's History     3 Credit Hours

Seminar on the historiograpy and key primary sources related to U.S. Women's History. The course covers examples of classic texts in the field as well as significant new works of scholarship, with an emphasis on critical reading, analysis, and historiography of the field. Studetns gain a deeper understanding of the field, its guiding concepts, foundational texts, newest trajectories, and impact on the field of history as a whole. The graduate version of this course includes weighter readings and assignments.

Prerequisite(s): HIST 300

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HIST 4677     Arab American Identities     3 Credit Hours

Beginning with an overview of the contemporary history and social developments in the Arab Near East, we survey immigration from the region to the U.S., and examine a range of evidence for understanding how Arab immigrants became an integral part of U.S. society. We examine immigrant narratives and immigration paradigms, to appreciate the successes and challenges Arabs and Arab Americans encountered. Readings and discussions explore various disciplinary approaches for understanding Arab Americans' experiences with race/ racialization, ethnicity, national attachments, sex, and gender. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): HIST 300 or (AAST 3676 or HIST 3676) or (AAST 3150 or HIST 3671)

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

HIST 4678     Middle Eastern Diasporas     3 Credit Hours

This course explores the diasporas of Arabs, Turks, Assyrians, and Iranians living in Europe and the Americas that have occurred since the 1880s. It pays careful attention to how "aspects of diaspora" shape, mimic, transect, and undermine the political and economic regimes of which they are part. The reception of Middle Eastern communities in different national contexts and historical periods receive special attention as do their adaptive strategies as religious, ethnic, gendered, and racialized minorities. Those enrolled in the graduate level of the course pursue additional readings and assignments.

Prerequisite(s): AAST 3150 or HIST 300

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HIST 490     Sel Topics Seminar in History     3 Credit Hours

Examination of problems and issues in selected areas of history. Title as listed in Schedule of Classes changes according to content. Course may be repeated for credit when specific topics differ. Primarily, but not exclusively, for undergraduate history concentrators. Students are introduced to current issues in the area of historical research and learn how to appreciate selected writings, which represent the best of recent scholarship. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): HIST 300

HIST 497H     History Seminar     3 Credit Hours

This course is unlike other courses offered by the history discipline in that its primary function is to introduce students to the process of intensive historical inquiry with its end being the production of a high-quality, original research paper. As a seminar, it is intended for advanced concentrators who will research their own specialized topics within the intellectual community of the seminar?providing support and enrichment for the other class members. The general theme for the semester is ?Microhistory.? Within this general rubric we will be focusing upon three major issues: 1) Microhistory as a tool of historical investigation/analysis [i.e., what is microhistory?], 2) the advantages/disadvantages of this approach to historical inquiry [what can it reveal for us?], and 3) employing the technique to produce a discrete microhistorical study [how do we do it?]. The overall purpose of this micro-level approach is to provide a distinct, readily accessible medium through which to consider broader historical trends.

HIST 498     Senior Honors Thesis     3 Credit Hours

Two successive semesters of independent work on a major research paper under the direction of a member of the discipline and the program coordinator. (F,W).

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Senior or Graduate
Can enroll if Major is History

HIST 499     Advanced Ind Studies in Hist     1 to 4 Credit Hours

Readings and analytical writing in history, in accordance with the interests of the student and approval of the instructor. Students must submit a written proposal of study for approval. (OC).

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

HIST 4999     Senior Research Seminar     3 Credit Hours

This seminar is required for the completion of an undergraduate degree in history. Students will develop an independent research paper that is well-grounded in the appropriate academic literature and using advanced research methodology. History concentrators may not use credit for both this course and HIST 497 or HIST 498 to meet their capstone requirement.

Prerequisite(s): HIST 300

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Senior
Can enroll if Major is History

*An asterisk denotes that a course may be taken concurrently.

Frequency of Offering

The following abbreviations are used to denote the frequency of offering: (F) fall term; (W) winter term; (S) summer term; (F, W) fall and winter terms; (YR) once a year; (AY) alternating years; (OC) offered occasionally