Sociology (SOC)

SOC 200     Understanding Society     3 Credit Hours

An introduction to the study of human groups with special attention devoted to an analysis of contemporary American society. (F,W).

SOC 201     Contemporary Social Problems     3 Credit Hours

The study of major social problems with particular reference to American society. Problems such as crime, mental disorders, addiction, drug abuse, suicide, racial conflict, urban decay, pollution, population, and family disorganization are studied both from a descriptive and theoretical point of view and analyzed collectively as a manifestation of a complex, industrial society. (YR).

SOC 215     Research Skills BSci     1 Credit Hour

Full Title: Research Skills for the Behavioral Sciences This course teaches foundational research and critical-thinking skills necessary for the success of students in the Behavioral Sciences (including Anthropology, Psychology, and Sociology) in conducting university-level research projects, papers, and other research assignments. Students will learn important research skills like distinguishing between scholarly and non-scholarly sources of information, using library search tools to find peer-reviewed and scholarly sources, evaluating and analyzing information sources and using them to build informed opinions and arguments, integrating and synthesizing sources, and using sources ethically. Students will learn these skills through lectures, practice and by applying them through a series of assignments. (F, W, S)

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate
Can enroll if College is Arts, Sciences, and Letters

SOC 263     Western Culture III     3 Credit Hours

The third of four courses on Western Culture required of all honors students. Covers the period from 17th to 19th centuries. Focus in on the emergence of scientific thought, Enlightenment political theory, Romantic individualism, and the great 19th century intellectual revolutions of Darwinism, Marxism, and feminism. Materials will be drawn from literature, philosophy, political, and scientific writings of the period. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): (HUM 262 or HIST 262) and (HUM 261 or HIST 261)

SOC 264     West Cult IV: The Modern Era     3 Credit Hours

Fourth of four courses in Western Culture required of all Honors students. Course covers period from 19th century to present. Focus will be on selected major issues of Western Civilization in the modern era: science and human values, bureaucratic and totalitarian societies, psychoanalytical thought, feminism, nihilism, existentialism. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): HIST 365

SOC 303     Intro to Women's & Gender Stud     3 Credit Hours

This course provides an interdisciplinary overview of the key theories and topics in Women's and Gender Studies. Special attention is given to how gender intersects with class, race, nationality, religion and sexuality to structure women's and men's lives. Students are also introduced to methods of gender analysis and will begin to apply these methods to topics such as women and health, gender roles in the family, violence against women, and gendered images in the mass media.

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

SOC 304     Studies in Det.Hist. & Culture     3 Credit Hours

This interdisciplinary course explores the political, social, and cultural histroy of Detroit by examining ways various groups and classes have interacted with and been shaped by structures of power and influence. The course highlights trade and commerce, newcomers, and the influence of organizations and institutions within the contexts of labor, race, ethnic, and religous histories and current affairs, and examines how these fit into the evolution of Detroit from the 19th century to the present. Where pertinent the influence of national and international movements included.

SOC 306     Comparat. American Identities     3 Credit Hours

This course will confront and complicate the following key questions: what does it mean to be an American? What is American culture? Participants in this course will respond to the questions central to the American Studies field by reading and discussing historical, sociological, literary, artistic, material culture, political, economic, and other sources. Students will use this interdisciplinary study to examine the multiple identities of Americans - as determined by factors such as gender, race, class, ethnicity, and religion. While emphasizing the diversity of American culture, participants will consider some core values and ideas uniting America both in historical and contemporary society. Students will be invited to seek out and share fresh narratives of the American experience.

Prerequisite(s): COMP 106 or CPAS with a score of 40 or COMP 220 or COMP 270 or COMP 280

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 308     Sociological Theory     3 Credit Hours

A historical survey of the major theorists and their works from the beginnings of sociological positivism to contemporary theories. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 309     Introduction to Law & Society     3 Credit Hours

Law and Society is a field of study that examines the interaction between the legal system and society from the perspective of the social sciences and humanities. This course focuses on core components of the legal system including courts, lawmaking bodies, regulatory administration, alternative dispute resolution systems, and the legal profession. Throughout the course, students develop the ability to examine the legal system and its relationship to equality, social change, and public benefits using social science evidence. (YR)

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

SOC 310     Computers and Society     3 Credit Hours

A sociological discussion of computers and other information technology. Starting with the larger context of technology and social change, an exploration of various forms of information technology, their history and development, their relationship to the changing social structure of a post- industrial society like 20th/21st century USA. Case studies could include "Computers and the Workplace," "Computers in Medicine," "Computers and Education," and "Computers in Popular Culture." Course concludes with a discussion of new social problems and possible futures. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 350     Poverty and Inequality     3 Credit Hours

In a middle class-oriented culture, the poor experience many problems and are also considered deviant which tend to make poverty self-perpetuating. This stratum will be explored with respect to life styles, life changes, contributing factors, characteristics, individual and social consequences, and evaluation of attempted solutions. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 362     Social Life in Science Fiction     3 Credit Hours

This course focuses on the sociological analysis of social life depicted in contemporary and popular science fiction texts and films. The course examine the impact and consequences of different modes of social reproduction and family relations, social structure and organization, social inequality and stratification, social relations and conflicts, social mores, values and scenarios of dystopia. Through studying science fiction, students gain insight in our present's society's hopes, dreams, anxieties, and fears about future social relations, the environment and humanity. (W)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 366     Sexualities, Genders, & Bodies     3 Credit Hours

This course introduces key questions and debates in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer studies. Through engagement with multidisciplinary sources, students explore how sexualities, genders, and bodies are constructed and contested, how these constructions vary in diverse contexts and historical moments, and what gaps remain in our knowledge of LGBTQ lives. (YR)

SOC 382     Social Psychology     3 Credit Hours

An introductory study of the interrelationships of the functioning of social systems and the behavior and attitudes of individuals. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or PSYC 170 or PSYC 171 or SOC 201 or PSYC 101

SOC 388     LGBTQ Religious Experience     3 Credit Hours

This course explores intersections of religion, spirituality, and faith with sexuality and gender. Christianity and Islam receive particular attention. We also examine Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) journeys within Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, new spiritual movements, and interfaith work. The course highlights intersections at three levels of analysis: the individual or personal level (how do LGBTQ identities intersect and interact with religious freedom and practice?), the interactional or community level (how do LGBTQ people experience belonging and rejection in diverse faith communities?) and the institutional level (how do the structures of these belief systems shape the life chances of LGBTQ people in society?). (W,S,AY)

SOC 390     Topics in Sociology     3 Credit Hours

Examination of problems and issues in selected areas of sociology. Title in Schedule of Classes will change according to course content. Course may be repeated for credit when specific topics differ. (F,W).

SOC 390A     Topics in Sociology     3 Credit Hours

TOPIC TITLE: Medical Profession: Past, Present, and Future. This course will examine the continuing evolution of the medical profession, from low status craft in the 19th Century, to high status profession in the middle of the 20th Century, to beleaguered interest group in the 1990's. What has occurred both within and outside the profession to bring about these changes? What is the condition of the medical profession today and what organizational changes does it face in the future? Among the special topics addressed will be how the profession regulates itself and 'guarantees' quality of medical care, and how pressures for cost containment impact medical practice. These are the central issues of the 1990's.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201 or PSYC 170 or PSYC 171

SOC 390B     Topics in Sociology     3 Credit Hours

This seminar will examine the meaning of gender and the ways in which gender ideologies have been (and are currently) used as organizing principles for social systems, for knowledge, and for perception itself.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Sophomore or Junior or Senior

SOC 390C     Topics in Sociology     3 Credit Hours

TOPIC: Theoritical Perspectives on Gender and Difference. Will explore some major developments and inter- disciplinary perspectives within feminist theory. It will examine feminist innovations in social, political, and cultural theory and in feminine epistemology. It will also consider some of the fundamental questions these theories and methods raise about the origins of gender, the development and maintenance of patriarchy, and the inter- sections of gender, race, class, disability, age, and sexuality as categories of analysis and as bases of oppression or privilege.

Prerequisite(s): WST 275

SOC 390D     Topics in Sociology     3 Credit Hours

TOPIC: Narratives in Childbirth: A Feminist Perspective. This course will acquaint students with an historical outline of birth and midwifery in the western world. Focusing on the shift from the home to the hospital as the primary place for birth, this course will explore the changing role of birth attendants and the application of modern technology in the arena of childbirth. Differing philosophies of labor and birth will be considered, as well as birth and midwifery in cultural contexts. Birth, explored in historical and contemporary contexts, will also include "hands on" accounts of birth stories. Analytical opportunities for reflection upon the broader socio- cultural significance of attendance on women in childbirth in the postmodern era will be a pedagogical focus.

Prerequisite(s): WST 275 or SOC 200 or SOC 201 or ANTH 101 or ENGL 230

SOC 398     Directed Readings     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Reading assignments in sociology. No more than a total of six credit hours of SOC 398 and SOC 498 may be applied toward concentration. Permission of instructor required. (F,W,S).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 402     Genocide     3 Credit Hours

Applies concepts and theories dealing with rumor, prejudice, group contagion, and mass movements to the Jewish, Armenian, and American-Indian genocides. In addition, psychological, philosophical, and political issues related to genocide are addressed. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 403     Minority Groups     3 Credit Hours

The status of racial and ethnic minorities in the United States with particular reference to the social dynamics involved with regard to majority-minority relations. Topics of study include inequality, segregation, pluralism, the nature and causes of prejudice and discrimination and the impact that such patterns have upon American life. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 403 and SOC 503. (F,W).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 4045     Dissed: Differ, Power, Discrim     3 Credit Hours

Have you ever been dissed? Why are some people targets of disrespect? This class examines the unequal distribution of power - social, economic, and political - in the United States and other countries that results in favor for privileged groups. We will examine a variety of institutional practices and individual beliefs that contribute to disrespect. We'll look at ways that beliefs and practices, like viewing inequality as consequence of a 'natural order', obscure the processes that create and sustain social discrimination. We will engage in the intellectual examination of systems, behaviors, and ideologies that maintain discrimination and the unequal distribution of power and resources. Students will not receive credit for both SOC 404 and SOC 504.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore or Junior or Senior
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 4075     Sexual Praxis and Theory     3 Credit Hours

This course will offer an overview of sexual differences including: the socio-cultural construction of gender, sexual behavior, and orientation; sex and sexualities in language and literature; and diversity by race, class, and cultural heritage. These topics will enable students to understand human sexuality within and across a continuum removing notions of duality, or polarity, in sexual behaviors and orientations. Examples both from within Western society and from non-Western societies may be used to further this position. Theoretical perspectives may encompass sociological and anthropological work, literary theory and criticism, queer theory, and multi-disciplinary discussions/discourse. Texts may include: Sex and the Machine: Readings in Culture, Gender and Technology, The Anatomy of Love, The Lesbian and Gay Studies Reader, Second Skins: The Body Narratives of Transexuality, and Lesbian and Gay Marriage.

Prerequisite(s): WST 275 or WGST 275 or SOC 275 or HUM 275 or PSYC 275 or SOC 443 or ANTH 275 or PSYC 405 or ANTH 406 or ANTH 101 or WGST 303 or PSYC 303 or SOC 303 or ANTH 303 or HUM 303

SOC 409     Feminist Theories     3 Credit Hours

This course examines the different perspectives that feminist theorists have offered to analyze the unequal conditions of women's and men's lives. Students taking this course will develop an understanding of how theory functions as a way to know, understand and change the world. They will also be provided with a lens for comparing the assumptions and implications of alternative theoretical perspectives. A particular emphasis of this course is on theorizing the interrelationships among gender, race, class, sexuality and nationality. Course material includes applications of feminist theory to issues such as gender identity formation; sexuality; gender, law and citizenship; women and work; and the history and politics of social movements. Student will not receive credit of both SOC 409 and SOC 509. (AY)

Prerequisite(s): WGST 275 or WST 275 or SOC 200 or SOC 201 or PSYC 275 or SOC 275 or ANTH 275 or HUM 275 or WGST 303 or PSYC 303 or SOC 303 or ANTH 303 or HUM 303

SOC 410     Quantitative Research     4 Credit Hours

An introduction to methods of data collection and analysis. Elementary statistics data are analyzed using computerized statistics programs. A discussion of research design and the philosophy of social science is also included. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 410 and SOC 510. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 411     Program Evaluation     3 Credit Hours

The application of social research procedures in assessing whether a human service program is needed, likely to be used, conducted as planned, and actually helps people in need. The course will cover research design and measurement as well as issues of how to get research findings utilized. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 411 and SOC 511. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 SOC 200 or PSYC 170 or PSYC 171 or POL 101 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 412     Men and Masculinities     3 Credit Hours

This course addresses the question, "What is a man?", in various historical, cross-cultural, and contemporary contexts. A major focus on the social and cultural factors that underlie and shape conceptions of manhood and masculinity in America as well as in a variety of societies around the globe. (AY).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201 or ANTH 101 or WST 275 or WGST 275 or PSYC 275 or SOC 275 or ANTH 275 or HUM 275 or WGST 303 or PSYC 303 or SOC 303 or ANTH 303 or HUM 303

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 413     Qualitative Research     3 Credit Hours

Qualitative research methods involve the observation and study of people in their everyday lives, in their taken-for-granted worlds. Qualitative research seeks to combine close empirical observation with analytic techniques that demand (and teach) personal and social self-consciousness as necessary to an understanding of the social worlds of ?others?. This course in qualitative methods is designed to acquaint students with field research theories and techniques. Students will gain hands on experience in participant observation, interviewing and the use of sociological scholarship. Qualitative Research Methods will prepare students to gather data, focus the data in a social scientific manner, analyze the data, and then organize it in reportable form.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 308

SOC 422     Structure of American Society     3 Credit Hours

An analysis of the institutional structure of American society, with a view of determining the degree of its integration. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 442 and SOC 522. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 423     American Social Classes     3 Credit Hours

Stratification of American communities and society; a review of the findings of major studies and an introduction to methodology. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 423 and SOC 523. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 426     Society and Aging     3 Credit Hours

Personal, interpersonal, and institutional significance of aging and age categories. Sociological dimension of aging based on social, psychological, and demographic factors. Attention to social networks and institutionalization. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 426 and SOC 526. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 430     Population Problems     3 Credit Hours

Social causes and consequences of population structure and change. How variations in fertility, mortality, and migration arise and how they affect society. Illustrations from the United States and a variety of developed and underdeveloped countries. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 435     Urban Sociology     3 Credit Hours

A descriptive study of the form and development of the urban community with respect to demographic structure, spatial and temporal patterns, and functional organization. The relationship of city and hinterland. Social planning and its problems in the urban community. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 435 and SOC 535. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 436     Personality and Society     3 Credit Hours

Deals with the forms and modes of change of personality, social structure, and culture; examines their interactions with body/population, niche/environment, and technology. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 439     Sociology of Professions     3 Credit Hours

Course begins with a review of the sociological literature on the professions. It will then focus on the medical, legal, and business/managerial professions as case studies of the development of professions in post-industrial society. Intrinsic to the definition of profession is "autonomy." The course will explore what is happening to professions and professional autonomy in highly bureaucratized and corporatized societies, where we speak of deprofessionalization and proletarianization of professions. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 440     Medical Sociology     3 Credit Hours

An analysis of health and illness behavior from the point of view of the consumer, as well as of medical professionals, the structure, strengths, and weaknesses of the medical care delivery system in the U.S.; the impact of culture and personality on illness behavior; and a study of the institution of medicine and activities of health care professionals. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 440 and SOC 540. (F,W,S)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 441     Sociology of the Auto Industry     3 Credit Hours

The American auto industry is examined in its relationship to the economic and political structures of 20th-century United States. This includes a focus on the social history of the industry as well as a discussion of the nature of auto work. Proposals for changing social relations at work are also examined. Concludes with an examination of the impact of the industry on a local community (Detroit). Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 441 and SOC 541. (F,W)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 442     Sociology of Work     3 Credit Hours

Study of work roles in modern society. The impact of industrialization, professionalization, and unionization on the conditions of work, worker motivation, and job satisfaction. Career choice processes and career patterns, occupational status and prestige, and occupational associations are among the topics considered. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 442 and SOC 542. (YR)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 443     Gender Roles     3 Credit Hours

This course will investigate the development of gender roles in childhood and adolescence due to either innate physiological differences or sociological patterning, the effect of gender roles upon male-female relationships within our society, and the possibility of transcending sociological gender roles in alternate modes of living. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 443 and SOC 543. (F,W,S).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or PSYC 170 or PSYC 171 or SOC 201 or PSYC 101

SOC 444     The Medical Profession     3 Credit Hours

Professions are the hallmark of modern society, and the medical profession is a prototype of what is meant by a profession. This course will examine the nature and history of the American medical profession, how it developed and changed since the early 1800's. What is the nature of the profession today? What social forces have shaped it? What does the future hold? These are some of the questions the course will address. (W).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or POL 201

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

SOC 445     The Family     3 Credit Hours

The family as an institution shaped by other aspects of society, as a social system with its own dynamics, and as a primary group affecting the lives of its members. Historical and contemporary materials from the United States and other cultures. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 445 and SOC 545. (F,W,S).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 446     Marriage and Family Problems     3 Credit Hours

Sociological analysis of problems encountered within the institution of marriage with particular reference to such issues as choosing a marriage partner, sexual adjustment, occupational involvement, conflict resolution, child rearing, divorce and readjustment. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 446 and SOC 546. (YR)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 447     Family Violence     3 Credit Hours

Sociological analyses of various forms of family violence which occur disproportionately in the lives of girls and women. Topics such as incest, sexual abuse, date rape, wife battering, and elder abuse will be situated within the social and cultural context of contemporary gender relationships. Social and political responses to the phenomena will be examined. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 447 and SOC 547. (YR)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 301 or SOC 443 or PSYC 405 or WST 405 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 448     Comparative Health Care Sys     3 Credit Hours

An introduction and overview of the English, Swedish and People's Republic of China health care systems. Focus on cultural context and other organizational characteristics, unique features, approaches and ability to solve problems. Emphasis on how the three systems help us understand the American health care system. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 448 and SOC 548. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 449     Black Family in Contemp Amer     3 Credit Hours

The African-American family is examined in relationship to the historical and contemporary forces that have shaped its characteristic patterns of family life. These forces include the influence of slavery, urbanization, racial discrimination and urban poverty. The patterns of family life include parental roles, family structure, kinship relations, and gender roles. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 450     Political Sociology     3 Credit Hours

Examines how society effects the distribution and exercise of power through analyzing linkages between power, participation, and perspectives. Studies of political participation and social organization, ideology and social conflict, as well as political socialization, represent some of the major parameters. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 450 and SOC 550. (YR)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 451     Family, Sexuality, Rights     3 Credit Hours

This course investigates the changing possibilities for forming families and expressing sexuality, with a focus on how nation states and legal and cultural systems construct and respond to these changes. Selected topics include the meanings of sex, love, marraige, and relatedness in different historical moments; struggles for recognition of varied kinship and family arrangements, such as interracial, interfaith, same-sex, polygamous and multi-partner relationships; and new technologies and their implications for family life. (YR)

Prerequisite(s): (WGST 303 or SOC 303 or ANTH 303 or PSYC 303 or HUM 303) or (SOC 200 or SOC 201) or (ANTH 101 or ANTH 202)

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Sophomore or Junior or Senior

SOC 452     Marxism     3 Credit Hours

This survey of Marxist and neo-Marxist thought discusses philosophy, economic history, and socialism. Topics include Marx's view of the nature of man, class conflict, the dialectic in history, the labor theory of value, monopoly capital and imperialism. Problems of socialist societies such as economic development and rule of elites will also be discussed. (AY).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or POL 101 or ECON 201 or ECON 202 or SOC 201

SOC 453     Sociology of Law     3 Credit Hours

Various aspects of the relationship between law and society are explored. After a look at processes of law making, attention is turned to the administration of law. This involves a study of the activities of legislatures, courts, police, and correctional agents. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 453 and SOC 553. (YR)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 454     Mental Health and the Law     3 Credit Hours

Courts and legislatures now control much of the work of mental health professionals such as social workers, counselors, therapists, and psychologists. This course looks at problems encountered in putting the laws and policies into effect. These implementation problems are much the same in other areas of government action, such as poverty programs and pollution control. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 454 and SOC 554. (YR)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 455     Sociology of Religion     3 Credit Hours

Religion as a social institution; its purposes, methods, structure, and beliefs, and its relation to other institutions. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 455 and SOC 555. (YR)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 4555     Immigrant Cultures and Gender     3 Credit Hours

The history and culture of immigration since 1850, including (1) formation and perseverance of immigrant communities and interethnic boundaries; (2) relations between the homeland and the immigrant; and (3) impact of migration on family life and gender roles.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 101 or WGST 303 or SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior

SOC 456     Health Care and the Law     3 Credit Hours

A sociological study of legal issues in health care, including regulation of hospitals, consent for treatment, confidentiality, experimentation, family planning, children's rights, access to health care. The emphasis will be on the organizational and personal consequences of legal requirements. Junior/Senior standing is a requirement. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 456 and SOC 556. (AY).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201 or POL 364

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior or Graduate

SOC 457     Family, Aging and the Law     3 Credit Hours

The law exerts a powerful impact on the family and the elderly. This course interprets the effects of laws concerning guardianship, competence, nursing home regulation, marriage, divorce, custody, adoption, abortion, and child sexual abuse.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 458     Sociology of Education     3 Credit Hours

Education as a social institution; its purposes, methods, structure, and philosophy, and its relation to other institutions, particularly in the urban setting. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 458 and SOC 558. (YR)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 460     America in a Global Society     3 Credit Hours

Social changes in America are studied from an internal and an external perspective. The internal dynamics of social change emphasize the role of social movement, e.g., the impact of the civil rights movement on American culture and politics. The external perspective sees America as part of a changing global society. The development of the capitalist world system from its origin in Western Europe to its present global reach is examined. Contemporary American social problems are examined in relation to America's position in a rapidly changing world. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 460 and SOC 560. (AY)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 461     Cops & Cons: Women in Prison     3 Credit Hours

Course uses contemporary theories of gendered organizations to frame analyses of prison policies and practices in employment and incarceration as they reflect and reproduce gender inequalities. Analyses will be framed within a restorative justice model, that is, a critique of the current criminal justice system of retributive justice and a paradigm of what a alternative system could be.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201 or WST 275 or WGST 275 or CRJ 240 or CRJ 300 or PSYC 275 or SOC 275 or ANTH 275 or HUM 275 or WGST 303 or PSYC 303 or SOC 303 or ANTH 303 or HUM 303

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior

SOC 465     Deviant Behavior/Soc Disorganz     3 Credit Hours

A general analysis of the concept of social deviance and social disorganization: factors producing each condition, the effects of social control measures on the course of deviance and disorganization consequences for the social system, and the relationship between the two. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 465 and SOC 565. (YR)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 466     Drugs, Alcohol, and Society     3 Credit Hours

Analyses of the sociology of substance use and abuse. Provides a sociological framework for understanding issues and evaluating our nation's responses to the phenomenon of drug use. Drawing on sociocultural and social psychological perspectives, this course systematically examines the social structure, social problems, and social policy aspects of drugs in American society. Prerequisite or permission of instructor. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior

SOC 467     Drugs, Crime, and Justice     3 Credit Hours

Provides a comprehensive analysis of the current state of research on interactions between crime and drug use. Examines drug distribution, organization of drug systems, and mechanisms of social control of drug systems. Analyzes the social problems associated with drugs and crime. The course also focuses on drug-law enforcement and public policy strategies for dealing with drugs and crime. Prerequisite or permission of instructor. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior

SOC 469     Juvenile Delinquency     3 Credit Hours

The analysis of juvenile delinquent behavior in relationship to the institutional framework of society. Emphasis on the extent, causes, and methods of treatment of juvenile delinquency in the United States. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 473     Race, Crime and Justice     3 Credit Hours

This course is an analysis of race and its relation to crime in the criminal justice system. Students will analyze and interpret the perceived connection between race and crime, while exploring the dynamics of race, crime, and justice in the United States. This course is designed to familiarize students with current research and theories of racial discrimination within America's criminal justice system.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

SOC 475     Diversity ISS in Mental Health     3 Credit Hours

Diversity Issues in Mental Health explores varied cultural descriptions and models of mental illness. By focusing on the ways that culture shapes how people experience, and respond to, mental illness this class explores cultural representations of mental illness, ranging from discrete illness resulting from a chemical imbalance to a profound threat to order. We seek to understand the cultural, personal, and political underpinnings of mental illness and medical practices in societies throughout the world. The course utilizes an interdisciplinary perspective, drawing from multiple sources of information regarding mental health issues, including feminism, psychiatry, history, sociology, and literature. Issues raised throughout the course include the ways gender, race, culture, religion, and stigma influence the diagnosis of mental illness, patterns of help-seeking behavior, formation of comprehensive mental health policy, and treatment options.

Prerequisite(s): WGST 303 or ANTH 303 or HUM 303 or SOC 303 or PSYC 303 or WGST 336 or HPS 336

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

SOC 476     Inside Out Prison Exchange     4 Credit Hours

This community-based course, taught in a local correctional facility, brings university students and incarcerated students together to study as peers. Together students explore issues of crime and justice, drawing on one another to create a deeper understanding of how these issues affect our lives as individuals and as a society. The course creates a dynamic partnership between UMD and a correctional facility to allow students to question approaches to issues of crime and justice in order to build a safer and more just society for all. The course encourages outside (UMD) students to contextualize and to think deeply about what they have learned about crime and criminals and to help them pursue the work of creating a restorative criminal justice system; it challenges inside students to place their life experiences into larger social contexts and to rekindle their intellectual self-confidence and interest in further education.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior

SOC 477     Social Welfare     3 Credit Hours

The practice of social work is examined within the context of the development of the social service professions and welfare institutions in American society. Social welfare is a concept that encompasses the provision of material resources, as well as regulation and protection of clients. Changes in welfare policy are analyzed in relationship to other institutional changes in American society. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 478     Social Work Internship     3 to 6 Credit Hours

Provides field experience in social welfare or criminal justice agencies, e.g., for children/adolescents, in residential programs, in abuse remediation, in probation, for chemical dependencies, in victim advocacy, for elderly, in prisons, for special needs populations, in court services, and for families and communities. Supervision by approved field instructors. An internship of 80 hours is required for three (3) credits. Instructor and student will work together to determine appropriate intern placement. Approval of instructor is required. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 479     Comparative Hlth Systems:Trip     3 Credit Hours

A unique combination of lectures, field trips, visits with general practitioners, specialists, hospital observations, talks with health policy planners, researchers, and many others. Personal experience in two health care systems. Permission of instructor. Junior/Senior standing required. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 479 and SOC 579. (AY).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior

SOC 481     Gender and Globalization     3 Credit Hours

Mass media, politics, and academia are full of references to globalization, and a future "world without borders." This interdisciplinary course considers the implication of globalization for women's lives, gender relations, and feminism. Topics covered include the global factory, cross-cultural consumption, human rights, global communications, economic restructuring, nationalism, and environmental challenges. Rather than survey international women's movements, this course explores how globalization reformulates identities and locations and the political possibilities they create. (AY).

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 303 or HUM 303 or SOC 303 or PSYC 303 or WGST 303

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate
Can enroll if College is Arts, Sciences, and Letters

SOC 482     Methods of Social Work Pract     3 Credit Hours

Examination of social work practice methods and approaches to social problems, contexts of practice and targets of change. Focus is on knowledge and skills each practice method requires to effect personal and social change. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

SOC 483     Images of Organizations     3 Credit Hours

Formal bureaucratic organizations such as government agencies, hospitals, and colleges are a distinctive feature of modern industrialized societies. Analysis of types of formal organizations, their goals, structure, and consequences for intra- and inter-organizational behavior helps to understand how to deal with a complex world. Students cannot receive credit for both SOC 483 and SOC 583. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 484     Violence Against Women     3 Credit Hours

Course examines local and global social violence against women outside family and other intimate relationships. Students consider violations against women's human rights through the life cycle, which are often sanctioned under the guise of cultural practices and misinterpretations of religious tenets. Topics include sex-selective abortion and female infanticide (the "missing millions"); female genital mutilation and cosmetic surgeries; prostitution and pornography; trafficking in women; sexual harassment; and women's experiences of war as soldiers, non-combatants and refugees. Topics are "paired", that is, students compare understandings of Western and non-Western social practices related to gender. Students examine both institutionalized sexism and racism, as part of political, economic, and social systems, and sexism and racism as realities affecting individual women's lives.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201 or WGST 303 or HUM 303 or PSYC 303 or ANTH 303 or SOC 303 or WGST 375 or HUM 275 or PSYC 275 or SOC 275 or ANTH 275 or WST 275

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

SOC 490     Advanced Topics in Sociology     3 Credit Hours

Examination of problems and issues in selected areas of sociology. Title as listed in the Schedule of Classes will change according to content. Course may be repeated for credit when specific topic differs.

SOC 490A     Advanced Topics in Sociology     3 Credit Hours

TOPIC: Diasporas and (Trans) Nationalism: Gender, Race, and Post/Coloniality. An interdisciplinary and comparative inquiry into historical & contemporary linkages between gender regimes, national formations, and legacies of colonialism as they interact at "home" and in "diasporas." Using multi-media and multi-genre pedagogical tools (conceptual and methodological writings; narratives and biographies; guest lectures; films), we study & critique different perspectives on how the dialectics of geography, positionality, and social structures shape the ways in which we imagine "home", "homeland", and "back home." We examine gendered politics of the colonial project 1) in early days of colonialization; 2) during struggles of decolonization; and 3) "post-colonial" geographies' While becoming familiar with "classics" in nationalism/transnationalism, gender, colonialism, and diaspora, we will explore their applicability to specific case studies in European and American contexts as well as in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East.

SOC 497     Senior Research Seminar     3 Credit Hours

This course is intended as the culmination of a student's prior work in sociology. Each student will conduct an applied research project that draws upon sociological concepts and issues. The product of this research will be an essential component of the student's concentration portfolio.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 410

SOC 498     Independent Study     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Analytical assignments in sociology. No more than a total of six credit hours of SOC 398 and SOC 498 may be applied toward concentration. Permission of instructor required. (F,W,S).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

 
*

An asterisk denotes that a course may be taken concurrently.

Frequency of Offering

The following abbreviations are used to denote the frequency of offering: (F) fall term; (W) winter term; (S) summer term; (F, W) fall and winter terms; (YR) once a year; (AY) alternating years; (OC) offered occasionally