College of Engineering and Computer Science

Engineering: The Profession

Engineers are the link between scientific knowledge and practical applications. Engineers combine various roles and functions in their job. What are engineers?

  • Engineers are science-knowledgeable men and women who use mathematics, chemistry, and physics for an applied purpose.
  • Engineers invent, design, or improve products that people want to buy or use.
  • Engineers are business people who design, manufacture, or sell a technical product or service to customers, taking into consideration safety, cost, quality, reliability, societal impact, and ease of use.
  • Engineers are planners and integrators who bring together skills and knowledge from many disciplines and fields for some technical purpose or application.
  • Engineers are creative problem-solvers and doers: they make decisions and get things done in a combined science/technical/ business/applied profession.
  • Engineers analyze problems, develop design solutions, and pay close attention to detail.
  • Engineers interact with a variety of people, including clients, scientists, other engineers, technicians, managers, and government officials.
  • Engineers are interested in how and why things work and like practical challenges.
  • Successful engineers are known for their analytical, imaginative, and creative skills, for using common sense, for being team players, for being able to pick up new knowledge and skills quickly, and for their commitment to continue to improve and learn.

The College of Engineering and Computer Science offers undergraduate engineering degrees in seven fields: Bioengineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Industrial and Systems Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Robotics Engineering.

Computer Science: The Profession

Computer and information scientists offer expertise in the effective and efficient use of computers for tackling a broad spectrum of practical challenges, usually in a team environment. Computer and information science includes the following sub-specialties: operating systems, compilers, computer graphics computer game design, computer networks and network administration, security, enterprise computing technologies, information and database systems and database administration, information retrieval, artificial intelligence and machine learning, robotics, theoretical computer science, programming languages, software engineering and web technologies. Software engineering is the area within computer science that is concerned with the theoretical and practical aspects of the detailed design, building, testing, modification, optimization, and maintenance of large, high quality, software systems for a wide range of applications across society. Software engineers analyze users’ needs and work as part of a core team to design, create, and implement high quality and cost effective new software, computer applications, and utility programs. A core team may be composed of software engineering, manufacturing, design, management, and marketing people who work together until the software product is released and implemented. Digital Forensics is the area of computer science concerned with the examination and analysis of computer hard drives, storage devices, cell phones, PDAs or any electronic device that may hold evidence that could be used in a court of law. The digital forensics analyst uncovers and preserves data for later use as legal evidence, and analyzes the data in light of a particular crime or criminal or civil investigation.

The College of Engineering and Computer Science offers undergraduate degrees in four computer science fields: Computer and Information Science, Data Science, Digital Forensics, and Software Engineering.

Career Choice

What can help students to decide to pursue a career in engineering or computer science? Some of the clues are an interest in and successful completion of science, mathematics, and computer science courses; a desire and ability to investigate the “why” as well as the “how” of things; and an interest in the creative development of devices or systems that meet specific needs. Not all of these signs or interests will fit everyone, but they can be used as a guide.

The College of Engineering and Computer Science’s Office of Advising and Academic Success has online information about careers in engineering and computer science and a number of links to very informative external web sites at: umdearborn.edu/cecs/SRA/links.

Individuals with interests in using science and mathematics to benefit others will find that engineering and computer science professions offer a wide variety of career and employment choices and opportunities.

Admissions counselors at UM-Dearborn and academic advisors of the College of Engineering and Computer Science are glad to talk with students about career choices or choosing the school that best suits their interest and abilities. Prospective students are welcome to contact the College of Engineering and Computer Science by phone or personal visit and to read the information on the College’s Web page umdearborn.edu/cecs.

Educational Goals and Programs

The mission of the College of Engineering and Computer Science is to be the leader in providing quality undergraduate and graduate programs in an environment integrated with engineering practice, research, and continuing professional education, in close partnership with the industrial community.

The College of Engineering and Computer Science’s (CECS) educational objective is to prepare its students to take positions of leadership commensurate with their interests and abilities in a world where science, engineering, and human relations are of basic importance.

Programs of study integrate fundamental mathematical and scientific theory with experiments, advanced analysis, and design practice to produce the coherent educational preparation required of professional engineers and computer scientists.

Both the CECS academic curriculum and co-operative placements are planned to prepare students to become practicing engineers or computer scientists, administrators, or investigators. The knowledge, skills, and discipline gained from the CECS degree programs are broad and fundamental and also constitute excellent preparation for other careers, such as law and medicine.

Undergraduate Requirements

The College of Engineering and Computer Science (CECS) offers undergraduate programs leading to the Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSE) degree in the following fields: bioengineering, computer engineering, electrical engineering, industrial and systems engineering, manufacturing engineering, robotics engineering, and mechanical engineering. (Students in these BSE programs may also choose to earn a concurrent second degree in engineering mathematics.) The College also offers an undergraduate degree program leading to a Bachelor of Science (BS) in the following fields: Computer and Information Science (CIS), Data Science, Digital Forensics, and Software Engineering. The CIS program has two concentrations: computer science and information systems. (Students in these BS programs may also choose to earn a concurrent second degree in CIS mathematics.)

The minimum credit-hour requirement for the degree programs in engineering is 125 to 128 semester credits, depending on the specific major. The BS in Software Engineering, Data Science, Digital Forensics, or in Computer and Information Science requires a minimum of 120 to 123 semester credits of course work, depending on the specific major.

The first two years can be considered pre-professional study covering foundation subjects, and the last two years are the specialized, professional phase of the degree program.

The scholastic requirements for graduation are given under “Requirements for Graduation” section of this Catalog. For the detailed requirements specified by the College of Engineering and Computer Science for each of its undergraduate programs, see the sections for each program below.

Students have the option of earning a minor in addition to their major. CECS offers a minor in Computer and Information Science. The College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters and the College of Business offer various minors of interest to CECS students. See the relevant sections of this Catalog.

The CECS Office of Advising and Academic Success, 2000 Heinz Prechter Engineering Complex (HPEC),  313-593-5510,  umd-cecs-undergrad@umich.edu, is the primary contact for undergraduate students for academic advising and for information about all undergraduate degree programs of the College of Engineering and Computer Science.

More information about CECS and its programs is available through the College’s home page: umdearborn.edu/cecs.

Admission to the College of Engineering and Computer Science

Admission requirements for entering as a freshman or a transfer student are described under the Admission Requirements, General Information section of this Catalog.

Admission to the College of Engineering and Computer Science (CECS) follows the traditional selective admission standards of the University of Michigan-Dearborn. Students are admitted from high schools directly to the CECS as freshmen or as transfer students from other colleges or universities.

Admission as a Transfer Student

The University of Michigan-Dearborn admits students as transfers who have completed course work at a community college or at another four-year school.

Transfer students can enter at or before the sophomore/junior level, and their preparatory work should have included foundation subjects in the areas of mathematics, science, and pre-engineering or computer science in order to begin their professional course work. Generally, the mathematics, science, or pre-engineering/pre-computer science programs of other engineering schools, of community colleges, and of liberal arts programs provide an appropriate preparation for admission to the College of Engineering and Computer Science.

Transfer guides for students interested in transferring into CECS from nearby colleges are available online: umdearborn.edu/cecs/pros_students/undergrad_info. Advisors at UM-Dearborn are available to assist prospective students by recommending a specific program of courses at a two-year institution to be taken prior to transfer.

Transfer of Credits

An appraisal of the previous record of a student transferring to the University of Michigan-Dearborn is made at the time of admission to determine the number of credits that apply toward the degree program specified by the applicant. In general, credit will be given for courses taken at accredited institutions in which the student earned at least a C grade and provided that the courses can appropriately be applied as meeting requirements of the student’s chosen degree program. Credit is not transferable for courses in which grades less than C or equivalent was earned in another institution. Irrespective of the number of credits the student has previously earned, a student must complete through instruction from the University of Michigan-Dearborn faculty, a minimum of 30 of the last 36 credits presented for the degree. At least 30 credits must be upper-level course work in their CECS major at the University of Michigan-Dearborn in order to qualify for a University of Michigan-Dearborn degree.

CECS Office of Advising and Academic Success

The College of Engineering and Computer Science (CECS) Office of Advising and Academic Success is the primary contact for undergraduate students for academic advising and for information about all undergraduate CECS programs. The office provides the following services to CECS undergraduate students:

  • academic orientation of freshmen and transfer students
  • academic advising of new and continuing students
  • evaluation of transfer credits, admission of cross-campus transfer applicants
  • coordination of registration, drops, adds, and total withdrawals
  • handling of petitions and individual requests
  • degree audits of students’ credits toward graduation
  • placement and release of academic holds
  • handling of academic (probationary) actions and petitions
  • readmission of previously enrolled students
  • final certification of degree completion.

The Office of Advising and Academic Success is located in room 2000 of the Heinz Prechter Engineering Complex (HPEC) (phone: 313-593-5510, FAX: 313-593-9967.

The Undergraduate Student Handbook, issued by the office, is available on-line at umich.app.box.com/s/6a5c4j9hwlctnppzy7o2xjmvlrtumvoj.

Other Programs

Graduate Programs

A Master of Science in Engineering (MSE) degree is offered in automotive systems, computer engineering, electrical engineering, energy systems, industrial and systems, manufacturing systems, and mechanical engineering. A Master of Science (MS) degree is offered in computer and information science, engineering management, information systems and technology, program and project management, and software engineering. Also, a MSE/MBA offered jointly with Industrial and Manufacturing Systems and the College of Business. See the UM-Dearborn Graduate Catalog for admission requirements and complete program and course descriptions.

Administration

Tony England, PhD, Dean

Ghassan Kridli, PhD, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education

Yi Lu Murphey, PhD, Associate Dean for Graduate Education and Research

John Cristiano, Director, Henry W. Patton Center for Engineering Education and Practice, and Institute for Advanced Vehicle Systems

Anthony DeLaRosa, Assistant Director, Experiential Learning

M.Jeanne Girard, Director, Office of Extended Learning and Outreach

Eric Kirk, Facilities Manager

Leigh McGrath, Business Manager

Lisa Remsing Hall, Director of Academic Services

Chairs and Directors

William I. Grosky, Chair, Department of Computer and Information Science

Ben Q. Li, Chair, Department of Mechanical Engineering

Pankaj K. Mallick, Director, Interdisciplinary Programs

Paul Richardson, Chair, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Armen Zakarian, Chair, Department of Industrical and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Professors Emeriti

Aswad, A. Adnan, PhD, Professor Emeritus of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Boffi, Luiz V., ScD, Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Bolling, Fredric, PhD, Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering

Cairns, J. Robert, PhD, Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering

Chang, Chia-hao, PhD, Professor Emeritus of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Conlon, Howard E., MS, Associate Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering

Despres, Thomas A., PhD, Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering

Habib, Izzeddin S., PhD, Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering

Heim, Dwight S., PhD, Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering

Kachhal, Swantantra K., PhD, Professor Emeritus of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Kampfner, Roberto, PhD, Associate Professor Emeritus of Computer and Information Science

Knight, James W., PhD, Associate Professor Emeritus of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Kurajian, George M., MS, Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering

Miller, Murray H., PhD, Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Mitchell, William J., MS, Associate Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering

Murtuza, Syed, PhD, Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Na, Tsung Y., PhD, Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering

Riordan, John, MS, Professor Emeritus of Computer and Information Science

Sullivan, Joseph E., MS, Associate Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Trojan, Paul K., PhD, Professor Emeritus of Metallurgical Engineering

Tsui, Louis, PhD, Associate Professor Emeritus of Computer and Information Science

Wolf, Louis W., PhD, Associate Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering

Faculty

Department of Computer and Information Science

Akingbehin, Kiumi, PhD, Wayne State University, Professor of Computer and Information Science

Dehzangi, Omid, PhD, Nanyang Technologicial University, Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science

Elenbogen, Bruce, PhD, Northwestern University, Associate Professor of Computer and Information Science

Grosky, William I., PhD, Yale University, Professor of Computer and Information Science

Guo, Jinhua, PhD, University of Georgia, Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science

Kessentini, Marouan, PhD, University of Montreal, Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science

Ma, Di, PhD, University of California-Irvine, Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science

Maxim, Bruce, PhD, University of Michigan, Associate Professor of Computer and Information Science

Medjahed, Brahim, PhD, Virginia Tech University, Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science

Ortiz, Luis, PhD, Brown University, Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science

Shen, Jie, PhD, University of Saskatchewan, Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science

Wang, Shengquan, PhD, Texas A M University, Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science

Xu, Zhiwei, PhD, Florida Atlantic University, Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science

Yoon, David, PhD, Wayne State University, Associate Professor of Computer and Information Science

Zhu, Qiang, PhD, University of Waterloo, Associate Professor of Computer and Information Science

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Awad, Selim Saad, PhD, Polytechnic Institute of Grenoble, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Baek, Stanley, PhD, University of California, Berkley, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

El Kateeb, Ali, PhD, Concordia University, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Kim, Taeyhung, PhD, Texas A M, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Lakshmanan, Sridhar, PhD, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Malik, Hafiz, PhD, University of Illinois At Chicago, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Miller, John, PhD, University of Toledo, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Murphey, Yi Lu, PhD, University of Michigan, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Rawashdeh, Samir, PhD, University of Kentucky, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Richardson, Paul C., PhD, Oakland University, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Shaout, Adnan, PhD, Syracuse University, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Shridhar, Malayappan, PhD, University of Aston, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Su, Wencong, PhD, North Carolina State University, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Wang, Mengqi, PhD, North Carolina State University, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Watta, Paul, PhD, Wayne State University, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Wei, Lu, PhD, Aalto University, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Xiang, Weidong, PhD, Tsinghua University, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Yi, Yasha, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Zhao, Dongming, PhD, Rutgers University, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Zheng, Yu, PhD, University of North Carolina, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Department of Industrial Manufacturing Systms Engineering

Chen, Xi, PhD, University of Minnesota, Assistant Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Chen, Yubao, PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Hu, Jian, PhD, Northwestern University, Assistant Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Jia, Bochen, PhD, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Assistant Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Kachhal, Swatantra K., PhD, University of Minnesota, Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Kim, Sang-Hwan, PhD, North Carolina State University, Associate Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Klungle, Roger G., DSc, George Washington University, Lecturer of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Knight, James W., PhD, Ohio State University, Associate Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Kridli, Ghassan, PhD, University of Missouri-Columbia, Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Lee, Cheol, PhD, Purdue University, Associate Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Liu, Yung-Wen, PhD, University of Washington, Associate Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Orady, Elsayed A., PhD, McMaster University, Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Ulgen, Onur, PhD, Texas Technological University, Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Xi, Zhimin, PhD, University of Maryland, Assistant Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Zakarian, Armen, PhD, University of Iowa, Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Argento, Alan, PhD, University of Michigan, Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Chakraborty, Nilay, PhD, University of North Carolina, Assistant Professor of Bioengineering

Cherng, John G., PhD, University of Tennessee, Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Chow, Chi L., PhD, University of London, Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Ghosh, Gargi, PhD, University of Kentucky, Assistant Professor of Bioengineering

Huntley, Hugh, PhD, University of Michigan, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Jung, Dohoy, PhD, University of Michigan, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Kanapathipillai, Mathumai, PhD, Iowa State University, Assistant Professor of Bioengineering

Kang, Hong Tae, PhD, University of Alabama, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Li, Ben Q., PhD, University of California Berkeley, Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Little, Robert E., PhD, University of Michigan, Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Lo, Joe Fu-Jiou, PhD, University of Southern California, Assistant Professor of Bioengineering

Lynch, Patrick, PhD, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Mallick, Pankaj K., PhD, Illinois Institute of Technology, Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Mei, Carole, PhD, University of Auckland, Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Mohanty, Pravansu, PhD, McGill University, Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Ostrom, Terry, PhD, University of Michigan, Lecturer of Mechanical Engineering

Ratts, Eric, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Reyes-Villanueva, German, PhD, University of Liverpool, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Sengupta, Subrata, PhD, Case Western Reserve University, Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Shim, Taehyun, PhD, University of California-Davis, Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Varde, Keshav S., PhD, University of Rochester, Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Zhang, Yi, PhD, University of Illinois at Chicago, Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Zikanov, Oleg, PhD, Moscow State University, Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Important Academic Policies

Listed below are some important policies affecting College of Engineering and Computer Science students. The CECS Undergraduate Student Handbook also has important information: umdearborn.edu/cecs/SRA/pdf/Student_Handbook.pdf

The English Composition Placement Exam is required of all students upon entering UM-Dearborn.

The Mathematics Placement Exam is required of all  freshmen before they register for a mathematics course. All transfer students expecting to take pre‑calculus or calculus I are also required to take the mathematics placement exam.

CECS students must take and pass the mathematics course into which they place. CECS students who register for a mathematics course other than the course into which they placed will be disenrolled from that course.

The Office of Admissions and Orientation 313-593-5100 schedules placement exams.

Prerequisite courses and co-requisite courses: A student needs to have the proper prerequisites to enroll in a course and cannot enroll in a course when one or more of its prerequisites need to be repeated because of probation. This is monitored by the College.

Grades: All courses required for CECS students must be taken for a grade. Grades count as part of a CECS student’s grade point average (GPA), except for the grades in ‘additive credit’ courses (EDF courses, or courses numbered 001 to 099).

Pass/Fail courses: CECS students cannot take required courses on an audit or Pass/Fail basis. Any course audited or taken Pass/Fail will not count towards the degree, even as a general elective. Pass/Fail or non-credit courses may be taken only for non‑degree credit.

Non-Credit Courses: Students cannot use non-credit courses towards their degree. A list of non-credit courses is found in the CECS Undergraduate Student Handbook available online:  umdearborn.edu/cecs/SRA/pdf/Student_Handbook.pdf

The D- Repeat Rule: Any course in which a CECS student earns the grade of D- does not carry degree credit. Any course in which a CECS student receives a D- must be repeated and must be passed with a higher grade in order for the course to count toward a CECS degree. This rule applies to all CECS students.

The On-Probation Repeat Rule: It is a CECS degree requirement that if a student’s overall cumulative GPA, CECS cumulative GPA, or both, drops below 2.0, any required courses with grades of C‑ or below taken during that semester must be repeated.

A student on academic probation who earns a grade of C- or below in a course that is a prerequisite course for another course, cannot elect the course without first repeating the prerequisite course. A student who elects a course without the proper prerequisites, or who needs to repeat the prerequisite because of probation, will be disenrolled from the course.

Course Registration

Changes in Course Elections: Add, Drop, Withdrawal

Please refer to the General Information section of this Catalog and the CECS Undergraduate Student Handbook for further information on changes in course elections.

CECS has a policy of required advising for undergraduate students.  CECS students meet with their assigned advisor each term prior to registering for classes for the following semester. Upon completion of 44 credit hours, students are assigned a faculty member as their advisor.

Adding Courses

Courses that extend over the full term must be elected during the two-week period beginning on the opening day of classes for the term. For seven-week half terms, or other scheduled terms shorter than a normal full term, course elections must be made during the first week of classes.

Late registration of courses is not permitted in most cases. Students are responsible for knowing the registration deadlines each semester.

Dropping Courses

Students may drop courses that extend over the full term without academic penalty during the nine-week period beginning on the first day of classes of the term.  For seven-week terms, or other scheduled terms shorter than a normal full term, this period will be four weeks.  A final grade of E will be recorded for an unofficially dropped course.

In the event of extraordinary circumstances realized subsequent to the stated four- or nine-week periods, a student may petition to drop a course after the regular drop deadline. Late drop petitions, like other petitions, are handled by the CECS Office of Advising and Academic Success (2070 HPEC). A late drop petition will be considered only for important medical or other compelling reasons and not merely because a student is doing poorly in a course.

Students must contact an SRA advisor in person to discuss a late drop petition since supporting documentation is always required.  Students continue to be registered for a course, and should continue to attend it and do all the assignments, unless and until their late drop petition is approved by the CECS Office of Advising and Academic Success.

Totally Withdrawing from the Term

Total Withdrawal: Students may withdraw from all their courses for a given semester up to the last day of classes (NOT the last day of exams). CECS students who are totally withdrawing (from all classes) always need the signature of a CECS academic advisor (Room 2070 HPEC).

Incomplete Coursework (I) or Absence from Final Examinations (X)

A CECS student whose term course work (other than the final examination) is incomplete in a minor way may, upon timely completion and approval of the I Contract Form, be granted the privilege of completing the course work within a five-week period, beginning on the first day of classes of the immediately following term. If granted this privilege, a mark of I will be recorded on the transcript.

A student who is unavoidably absent from a final examination may, by approval from the course instructor, be granted the privilege of making up the examination within a five-week period, beginning on the first day of classes of the immediately following term. If granted this privilege, a mark of X will be recorded (on the transcript).

Failure to complete the required work, or to make up the final examination, within the specified time, or the denial of this privilege for an I or an X by the instructor, will result in a grade of E for the final grade.

The I Contract form is obtainable from the CECS Office of Advising and Academic Success, 2070 HPEC. The I or X will remain on the transcript even after the official final letter grade is assigned.

In extenuating circumstances an extension beyond the stated period may be requested by means of a petition submitted to the CECS Office of Advising and Academic Success (2070 HPEC), which must also be approved by the instructor. However, such arrangements for completing the work must be made within the above mentioned five-week period.

Failure to complete the required work or examination within the specified time will result in a mark of I or X being automatically converted to a permanent IE or XE in the transcript, which will count as an E in the student’s grade point average.

Grading System

The following (4.0) grading system is used by the CECS:

Letter Grade Honor Points
A+4.0
A4.0
A-3.7
B+3.4
B3.0
B-2.7
C+2.4
C2.0
C-1.7
D+1.4
D1
D-0.7
E0.0
UE0.0

The honor points earned in a course are calculated by multiplying the honor points assigned for the grade by the credit hours for the course; e.g., an A grade in a three credit hour course yields 12 honor points. The semester grade point average is calculated by dividing the total honor points earned in a semester by the credit hours elected in that semester. The overall cumulative grade point average is obtained in the same manner with all courses elected at UM-Dearborn included in the calculation.

If any courses were repeated in the Fall 2005 or subsequent semesters, the most recent grade will be used in computing the grade point average, and a maximum of two previous grades in the same course will be excluded from calculation of the grade point average. A given course may be taken a maximum of three times.

Courses in which a mark of S, P, Y, F, or NC is received are not included in grade point average calculations.

A CECS student with a class rank of junior or senior and who is in good scholastic standing may, with the approval of the College, elect a non-CECS course that is not a part of the degree requirements, nor a prerequisite to any required course, using the Pass/Fail Option.

Selected courses may be offered by CECS on a grading basis of awarding S for satisfactory work, E for failing work, and NC for no credit. Any course assigned an S mark or an NC mark will not count towards degree requirements, nor will an S or an NC mark enter into the computation of a student’s grade point average. Only CIS co-op courses with an assigned S mark may count toward degree requirements. A grade of E will be treated as a conventional E on all records.

Class Standing

The number of credit hours accumulated at the close of a given term determines a student’s class standing.

Underclassmen
Freshman0 to 24
Sophomore25 to 54
Upperclassmen
Junior55 to 84
Senior85 or more

Scholastic Standing

In order to attain a BSE or BS degree, a student must achieve a final overall average of 2.0 or higher for all University of Michigan – Dearborn courses taken while enrolled in CECS. In addition, the student must obtain a grade point average of 2.0 or more for all elected CECS courses.

Good Standing

To be in good scholastic standing at the end of any term, a student must have an overall average of 2.0 or higher for all UM-Dearborn courses elected. Additionally, a student must have a 2.0 or above grade point average for all CECS courses elected.

Grades Less than C (2.0)

While a grade of C-, D+, or D is passing, it is not considered satisfactory scholastic performance. Any deficiency of grade points (below 2.0) in either the overall grade point average (GPA) or the CECS cumulative grade point average (CECS GPA) resulting from one or more C-, D+, D, or D- grades must be made up while enrolled in this College. C-, D+, D, or D- grades are used in computing the student’s GPA or CECS GPA or both.

A student must repeat, as early as possible, any required courses in which a C-, D+, D, or D- grade is received in a given term if either the overall GPA or CECS GPA falls below 2.0 at the end of that term. Moreover, if a student on academic probation earns a C-, D+, D, or D- grade in a prerequisite for another course, such a course cannot be elected without first repeating the prerequisite course.

Any course in which a student received D- must be repeated, even if the course was taken when the student’s overall cumulative GPA, and/or GPA in CECS courses, was above 2.0.

Neither credit nor grade points are allowed for a course in which a student received an E grade. Any deficiency of grade points (below 2.0 average) resulting from one or more E grades must be made up while enrolled in this College before the student is restored to good standing. A required course in which a grade of E has been assigned must be repeated on this campus during the student’s next academic term.

Continued Enrollment in the Cooperative Education Program

Although students on probation are normally allowed to continue their academic enrollment, they should consult immediately with the cooperative education program coordinator to review their status in the cooperative education phase of their program. Students will certainly jeopardize their ability to participate in this program if, during any term, their grade point average falls below 2.0. In the event that a student is placed on probation,CECS reserves the right to require that the student spend another term in class and not participate in a work assignment for that term.

Unsatisfactory Performance

The records of CECS students are reviewed at the end of each term by the Academic Standing Committee. Three degrees of scholastic deficiency are used by the Committee to identify a student’s unsatisfactory performance resulting from C-, D+, D, D-, and E grades: warning, on probation, or required to withdraw.

In cases where the grade average for one term falls below 2.0 while the overall average remains above 2.0, the student normally will receive a warning letter from the Committee.

Probationary status (academic probation) is normally assigned to students who are not in good scholastic standing but whose records indicate a possibility for removal of deficiencies by continued enrollment.  CECS students on academic probation are restricted to registering for no more than 13 credits per semester.

Students whose academic record is poor for two or three successive semesters are subject to being required to withdraw from the College. Students who have been required to withdraw may submit a formal written appeal to be readmitted at a later time, but must, in all cases, have had at least one semester of non-enrollment in CECS for their appeal to be accepted for consideration.

Academic Standing Appeal Proceedure

Students who wish to appeal a decision by the Academic Standing Committee requiring them to withdraw may do so by addressing a petition to the Executive Committee (the chief policy body) of the CECS. In all cases, the Executive Committee requires a one-term non-enrollment period, to allow students who have been required to withdraw time to reflect upon their situation, to consider alternatives, and to make plans. If a negative decision is rendered at this high level, the student may, under unusual circumstances, appeal the case to the Appeals Board of the UM-Dearborn.

Requirements for Graduation

In order to secure a degree of BSE or BS from the College of Engineering and Computer Science, UM-Dearborn, a student must meet the following requirements:

  1. Must have been admitted to a degree program in the CECS.
  2. Must satisfactorily complete the specified number of elective and required courses of the specific degree program.
  3. Must attain a grade point average of C (2.0) or better for all courses completed at UM-Dearborn.
  4. Must achieve a minimum grade average of C (2.0) for all CECS courses completed at UM-Dearborn.
  5. Must have completed at least 30 credit hours of upper-level CECS course work at UM-Dearborn of the degree program in which enrolled.
  6. Must be enrolled for credit in the CECS during the term in which the requirements for the degree are completed.
  7. Must have taken the English Composition Placement Exam and passed the appropriate composition course, as indicated by the results.
  8. Must have repeated all courses that needed to be repeated, in accordance with the policies stated above.
  9. Must have submitted a diploma application online through UM-Dearborn Connect by the third week of the beginning of the term in which the student expects to graduate.

In order to obtain a BSE in an engineering major and a concurrent BSE degree in Engineering Mathematics, or a BS degree in CIS, digital forensics, or software engineering and a concurrent degree in CIS Mathematics, the student must complete the specified minimum credit hours of additional and separate courses in advanced mathematics from the choices listed in the Engineering Mathematics degree program or the CIS Mathematics degree program, respectively.

Academic Code of Conduct

The Academic Code of Conduct (ACC) for the University of Michigan-Dearborn is based on the premise that undergraduate and graduate students will perform honestly and ethically on all tests, projects, and assignments. Students are expected to conduct themselves in a manner conducive to an environment of academic integrity and of respect for the educational process. Therefore, an individual should realize that deception for the purpose of individual gain is an offense against the members of the community.

Sanctions for violation of the Academic Code of Conduct may include one or more of the following: a letter of reprimand, reduction in course grade, failure in the course(s), entry of action on the student’s transcript, suspension, expulsion, and recession of a degree.

Familiarization with the code is the responsibility of every student at UM-Dearborn.  The Academic Code of Conduct can be found on the university policy page at umdearborn.edu/policies_umd.

See also under Student Rights and Responsibilities in the General Information section of this Catalog

Changes in Policies and Rules

The College of Engineering and Computer Science reserves the right to effect changes in curricula, policies, and rules. Students should consult with the CECS Office of Advising and Academic Success (2000 Heinz Prechter Engineering Complex) for the applicable rules at the time of admission.

Cooperative Education

The Engineering Cooperative Education Program (also known as an internship program) is a coordinated integration of classroom work and practical experience in business, industry, and government. The student alternates terms of attendance (co-op program does provide some flexibility, if needed) in class with four-month periods of employment with a cooperating organization, at the employer’s location, while supervised by representatives of both the University and the employer. The work experience is considered an integral part of the educational process, and both the College and the participating employer share responsibility for this integration.

The Computer Information Science Cooperative Education program, like that of Engineering, is an optional program for students who desire practical work experience related to a student’s academic background or individual career interest. Co-op students may be hired under any of three options: 1) alternating full-time, 2) parallel part-time, 3) summer only. Students are encouraged to complete a minimum of two work semesters with a participating employer.

Objectives, Advantages, and Renumeration

Emphasis is placed on the educational and training value of work assignments. The student’s earnings, though substantial, must be considered only as an attractive by-product of the cooperative educational processes. As a result, convenience of location or transportation and personal preferences of the student must yield to educational advantages if these advantages cannot be otherwise achieved.

Numerous firms located in Michigan and out-of-state afford a wide range of experiences in all major areas in which students may have career aspirations. Cooperative education experience in professional assignments permits a practical test of vocational interest, the application of classroom knowledge to practical problems, a first-hand exposure to labor-management relationships, the development of responsible work habits, and the prospects of full-time employment upon graduation.

Work assignments, salaries, and employee benefits provide students with the prospect of substantial self-support during their enrollment as UM-Dearborn students.

Student Counseling and Placement

The cooperative education coordinator of the College counsels each co-op student with respect to career interests and aptitudes, and arranges interviews with appropriate cooperating employers. These interviews furnish the opportunity for a professional work assignment that is agreeable to the student and to the employer.

Evaluation and Recognition of Achievement

Each student is formally evaluated by the employer, and also must prepare and submit a detailed, well-written work report to the director at the end of each work assignment period. At the conclusion of each work assignment period, a grade determined mainly from the employer’s evaluation and the student’s report will be assigned by the director and recorded on the student’s transcript. The grade assigned and recorded for each work assignment period will be either S for satisfactory or NC (no credit) for unsatisfactory.

Computer Information Science students are awarded academic credit by faculty on the basis of learning achievement and requirements met. CIS students may earn a maximum of nine credits toward their degree programs by completing the equivalent of three full-time (40 hr/wk) work terms for three credits each.

The cooperative education degree option requires a minimum of two work assignments and the possibility of an optional third term of professional employment in the program during the junior and senior years. Successful participation in the required professional work assignment periods is recognized by satisfactory cooperative education performance concurrent with the baccalaureate degree (Not applicable to CIS students). Additionally, the awarding of this certificate is recorded on the student’s academic transcript upon graduation. Eligibility for receiving the satisfactory cooperative education performance certificate will be determined by the engineering cooperative education director based upon the reports submitted on and by the student over the several periods of work assignments.

Participation in the Cooperative Education Program

Students in the cooperative education option offered by the College of Engineering and Computer Science shall participate in four-month work periods alternating with their classroom terms. Students admitted to the CIS co-op program must fulfill the study-term requirements of the alternate, parallel, or summer only plans. Details on the study-term requirements are available through the co-op office. These alternating work periods may not be waived except as follows: 1) where academic achievement in any term is so poor as to minimize the possibility of the student successfully pursuing the academic program to the end; in such cases, the student will immediately be required to repeat a regular classroom term or be caused to withdraw from the College of Engineering and Computer Science; 2) where such illness or disability exists that, in the opinion of the employer or suitable medical counselor, industrial assignment would not be in the best interests of the employer and/or the student during a particular term.

Both the cooperating employers and the University expect that students participating in the cooperative education program will be able to demonstrate a considerable increase in academic knowledge after each term of classroom study. Therefore, participants in the CECS Cooperative Education Program must be full-time students during their alternated class terms; that is, must satisfactorily complete at least 12 credit hours of their degree program course work during each scheduled class term.

Admission to the Cooperative Program

The first and most important step toward admission to the CECS Cooperative Education Program is current enrollment as an undergraduate student in good academic standing in a CECS degree program. Since the first co-op work period is always scheduled within the junior academic year, sophomores enrolled in the CECS will be accepted into the CECS Cooperative Education Program for participation in career counseling and placement interviewing activities during the second term of their sophomore year. Transfer students admitted to the CECS at the junior year level may be accepted into the Cooperative Education Program after completing one semester as a full-time student (12 credits). In all but the most unusual circumstances, all students must apply for admission to the internship program not later than during the registration week of the class term preceding their intended first work assignment period or as advertised by the CECS Cooperative Education Director.

An application for acceptance into the CECS Cooperative Education Program may be submitted later than the first term of the junior year but will not be approved when the class level of the student is such that there will not be sufficient time prior to graduation to participate in the program for at least two-co-op periods alternated with the usual terms of class.

The basic entrance-level requirement of the CECS Cooperative Education Program, applying to all students, is satisfactory completion of the sophomore year, with a recommended GPA of at least 2.30. Student admitted to the CIS program must have completed 30 semester hours (sophomore status) and have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.25. Transfer students must have completed 12 UM-Dearborn credit hours. The courses of this basic requirement include the calculus sequence, differential equations, linear algebra, college chemistry, the engineering physics sequence, and introductory courses in engineering that include computer-aided tools for design and analysis.

In addition to the basic entrance-level requirement there also are specific courses that must be satisfactorily completed before beginning the first co-op work period. These specific courses, which differ according to the degree programs, are all courses normally scheduled in the sophomore year under CECS’s basic freshman-sophomore curriculum (the equivalent course at another college may be acceptable for a transfer student).

For the mechanical engineering co-op student, the specific required courses that must be satisfactorily completed are computer methods in mechanical engineering and thermodynamics or applied mechanics.

The specific courses required for the industrial and manufacturing systems engineering co-op student are computer programming for engineers and manufacturing processes.
Thermodynamics and applied mechanics are optional courses.

For the electrical engineering co-op student, the specific required courses for those enrolled at UM-Dearborn during their sophomore year are digital systems in electrical engineering and the first courses in circuits.

The purpose of these course requirements is to prepare the co-op student academically for professional work assignments where there will be continual association with practicing engineers in their daily work. Through fulfillment of these requirements the co-op student will have sufficient competence to function as a member of an engineering group.

Registration in the Cooperative Education Program

Each co-op work assignment extends for one term (four months) and occupies the student full time. From a group of co-op courses available, the co-op student elects a two or three-credit hour course whose content is appropriate to the particular field of engineering and to the level of practice being undertaken that term. Three such registrations are recommended (two are required) for a total of seven credit hours, for satisfactory completion of the Cooperative Education Program. All credit hours earned via co-op courses are added to the academic (classroom) credit hours required in the undergraduate program of studies pursued by the student. Since the co-op work assignment occupies the student full-time, registration in courses other than the co-op course is strongly discouraged. A student on a co-op assignment cannot elect more than one other course besides the co-op course (two courses maximum including the co-op course) during the semester. CIS students can earn up to seven co-op credits toward graduation. CIS students register from a group of co-op courses (CIS 299, CIS 399, CIS 499). The student elects a three-credit hour course whose content is appropriate to the level of practice being undertaken that term. Three such registrations are recommended for satisfactory completion of the Cooperative Education Program.

In some instances students may be involved in a cooperative-type educational program prior to their eligibility for and/or acceptance into the Engineering Cooperative Education Program. Such cooperative-type programming might occur either while enrolled at UM-Dearborn or at another educational institution. However, no regular employment completed prior to formal enrollment in the CECS Cooperative Education Program will be considered as satisfying the requirements of the CECS Cooperative Education Program.

International Study

Student Exchange Programs with the Jönköping School of Engineering in Jönköping, Sweden and the Ulm University of Applied Sciences in Ulm, Germany

The College of Engineering and Computer Science has a formal student exchange program with the Jönköping School of Engineering in Jönköping, Sweden. CECS undergraduates in good standing in any major are eligible to apply. A formal exchange program also exists with Ulm University of Applied Sciences in Germany for Mechanical Engineering coursework.

Students choose the classes they will take during the student exchange semester in consultation with the CECS International Advisor  and with their faculty advisor. They register for their exchange classes at UM-Dearborn and pay regular UM-Dearborn tuition. The student exchange classes are listed as UM-Dearborn classes on the UM-Dearborn transcript. Students register for a full load during their student exchange semester, consisting of three technical courses in engineering or computer science taught in English and a fourth language course.

Prechter International Travel Fellowship

CECS students may be eligible for a travel fellowship to help defray some of the cost of travel associated with approved international studies. The travel fellowships are made possible by a gift from Ms. Waltraud Prechter to the CECS’ Institute for Advanced Vehicle Systems. 

CECS students should make an appointment with the CECS International Advisor (2000 HPEC) for information about the Jönköping and Ulm programs and the travel fellowship.

Career Opportunities

A wide variety of employment opportunities is available to computer and information science graduates, as mentioned above. The University’s Career Services Office assists students and graduates in planning careers in computer and information science and offers many job listings in the computer industry.

Cooperative Education/Internship Program

Work experience opportunities are available for qualified computer and information science students through the CECS Cooperative Education Office. These programs allow students to earn a salary and up to nine credit hours which can be applied toward graduation while working full-time during alternate semesters or part-time during regular semester for participating firms or governmental agencies (Acromag, APPLE, Chrysler, DENSO, DTE Energy, Ford, General Electric, Harmon Becker, NASA, Nokia, TACOM, U.S. Steel, Xilinx, etc..).

CIS Student Advisory Board (CISSAB)

The Department has in place a mechanism for ensuring continuous high-quality input from students at all levels, through a faculty-nominated board of students and alumni.

CIS Professional Advisory Board (CISPAB)

The Department continually seeks outside interactions with business, industries, and government through its Professional Advisory Board. The PAB is composed of senior computing technologists who provide input on curriculum, potential employment for students, research opportunities for faculty, and a perspective on future challenges requiring collaboration.

Computing Facilities

Student software development is done in various campus computing laboratories, having IBM-compatible PC’s, UNIX machines, a CRAY supercomputer, and Macintosh computers as well as specialized department computing laboratories. The software available includes state-of-the-art tools for database, video conferencing, software engineering, expert systems, a large number of operating systems (e.g., LINUX, Windows, Macintosh, etc.), programming languages and solid modeling tools. These labs are all staffed by student assistants under the direction of a laboratory manager.

Upsilon Pu Epsilon (UPE)

UPE is the national computer science honor society. Membership is available to upper-division students maintaining a 3.0 GPA for all course work. UPE sponsors a variety of educational and social events on campus.

Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)

The student chapter of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) sponsors “chalk talks” to help familiarize students with new computing technologies, guest speakers on computer-related topics, and a variety of social events.