History (HIST)

HIST 5312     European Encounters 1400-1800     3 Credit Hours

During the early modern period, merchants, explorers and travelers set out from the European West in unprecedented voyages of discovery, intensifying interaction between cultures and initiating contact with previously unknown civilizations. In this advances seminar we examine original documents (in English) as well as current scholarship about encounters between groups of Europeans and inhabitants of other parts of the world from the perspective of both sides. Comparing these contradictory (and often incompatible) accounts of the same events, provides a more comprehensive understanding of the process of European expansion, and of the strengths (and limitations) of historical sources. Additional assignments will distinguish the undergraduate and graduate versions of this course.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Graduate
Can enroll if College is Arts, Sciences, and Letters

HIST 5401     Seminar: African Diaspora     3 Credit Hours

Research seminar on the history of the African Diaspora in the Atlantic World. This course covers examples of classic texts in the field, as well as significant new scholarship, with an emphasis on critical reading, analysis, and the development of an independent research project. Students gain a deeper understanding of the significance of the African Diaspora in the New World, derived from lectures and discussions providing an overview of this subject, as well as the micro views gleaned from sharing classroom presentation about students? individual research topics. The graduate version of this course includes weightier readings and assignments, with a research paper for potential publication.

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore or Junior or Senior
Can enroll if Level is Rackham or Graduate

HIST 5505     Feminism & Mod. Mid. East     3 Credit Hours

This course provides an analysis of the history, historiography, and sources for the study of feminism in the Middle East since 1800. Additional assignments will distinguish the graduate version of this course from the undergraduate version.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Graduate

HIST 5515     Culture& Hist. in Mod. Iran     3 Credit Hours

Alongside the most influential academic studies of Iran, this course uses cultural sources (such as literature and film) as windows on the pivotal social and political movements in Iranian history since 1800. This study of cultural change factors in cultural debates inside Iran, the growth of the Iranian Diaspora, and the increased presence of Iranian culture in electronic media. Additional assignments distinguish the graduate version of this course from the undergraduate version.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Graduate

HIST 5600     U.S. Cultural History     3 Credit Hours

The seminar concentrates on scholarly interpretations of U.S. history through a cultural lens. It features close analysis of classic texts in American cultural history as well as significant new works of scholarship, with an emphasis on critical reading, analysis, and historiography of the field. Students gain a deeper understanding of the cultural aspect of U.S. history and a familiarity with this mode of analysis, its guiding theories, newest trajectories and scholarly debates, and impact on the field of history as a whole. The graduate version of the course features a major research project. Cannot receive credit for both HIST 490A and HIST 5600.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Graduate

HIST 565     The Family in History     3 Credit Hours

An analysis of the emergence of the modern family from the 16th century to the present with focus on the history of childrearing, family size and structure, intrafamilial and inter-generational relationships and population patterns. This course is distinguished from its 400 level counterpart by the requirement of additional readings and research. (AY)

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Graduate

HIST 5650     Sem in US Women's History     3 Credit Hours

Seminar on the historiograpy and key primary sources related to U.S. Women's History. The course covers examples of classic texts in the field as well as significant new works of scholarship, with an emphasis on critical reading, analysis, and historiography of the field. Studetns gain a deeper understanding of the field, its guiding concepts, foundational texts, newest trajectories, and impact on the field of history as a whole. The graduate version of this course includes weighter readings and assignments.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Graduate

HIST 5677     Arab American Identity     3 Credit Hours

Extensive discussions and critical analysis of the main markers of Arab American identity formation from late nineteenth century to present. This seminar provides in-depth assessments of immigrant narratives from various sources and disciplinary approaches on specific racial, ethnic, and gender experiences within the larger U.S. context. Additional assignments distinguish the graduate version of this course from the undergraduate version.

Prerequisite(s): HIST 300

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Graduate

HIST 5678     Middle Eastern Diasporas     3 Credit Hours

This course explores the diasporas of Arabs, Turks, Assyrians, and Iranians living in Europe and the Americas that have occurred since the 1880s. It pays careful attention to how "aspects of diaspora" shape, mimic, transect, and undermine the political and economic regimes of which they are part. The reception of Middle Eastern communities in different national contexts and historical periods receive special attention as do their adaptive strategies as religious, ethnic, gendered, and racialized minorities. Those enrolled in the graduate level of the course pursue additional readings and assignments.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Graduate

HIST 590     Topics in History     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Problems and issues in selected areas of history. Title changes according to content. Course may be repeated when specific topic differs. (OC).

HIST 590A     Topics in History     1 to 3 Credit Hours

TOPIC TITLE: Self-Emancipation During the Civil War for Middle School Teachers This course will examine one of the most frequently debated subjects in the field of Civil War history-that is, what role did African-Americans (both free and enslaved) play in the war-time emanicpation of slaves? Through an examination of the question from multiple perspectives, a close reading of primary sources, the viewing of historical documentaries, and active discussion, students will explore the merits of of the opposing viewpoints and will be able to reach an informed conclusion of their own about the debate. In the process will be introduced to the subtleties of historical interpretation, the ways in which history is used by individuals and groups in American society, and to the evolution of the process of emancipation during the American Civil War.

HIST 590B     Topics in History     1 to 3 Credit Hours

TOPIC TITLE: Self-Emancipation During the Civil War for High School Teachers This course will examine one of the most frequently debated subjects in the field of Civil War history-that is, what role did African-Americans (both free and enslaved) play in the war-time emancipation of slaves? Through an examination of the question from multiple perspectives, a close reading of primary sources, the viewing of historical documentaries, and active discussion, students will explore the merits of the opposing viewpoints and will be able to reach an informed conclusion of their own about the debate. In the process they will be introduced to the subtleties of historical interpretation, the ways in which history is used by individuals and groups in American society, and to the evolution of the process of emancipation during the American Civil War.

HIST 599     Advanced Ind Studies in Hist     1 to 4 Credit Hours

Readings and analytical writing in history, in accordance with the interests of the student and approval of the instructor. Students must submit a written proposal of study for approval. This course is distinguished from its 400 level counterpart by the requirement of additional readings and research. (F, W).

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Graduate

 
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An asterisk denotes that a course may be taken concurrently.

Frequency of Offering

The following abbreviations are used to denote the frequency of offering: (F) fall term; (W) winter term; (S) summer term; (F, W) fall and winter terms; (YR) once a year; (AY) alternating years; (OC) offered occasionally