Criminal Justice Studies (CRJ)

CRJ 200     Intro to Criminal Justice     3 Credit Hours

This course provides an introduction to issues of crime and neighborhood disorder as well as society's responses to these problems. We will examine the nature and causes of crime, criminal law, constitutional safeguards, and the organization and operation of the criminal justice system including the police, courts, and corrections. The history of the criminal justice system, terminology and career opportunities will also be discussed.

CRJ 300     Political Analysis     3 Credit Hours

Introduction to research design, data collection and analysis, sampling, and statistics for social scientists. Should be elected as soon as possible after the declaration of major. POL 101 or equivalent recommended. (F, W).

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 302     Theory of the Law     3 Credit Hours

A comprehensive introduction to the theoretical foundations and the political functions of law, with special emphasis on the different moral justifications of law; the relation between law and justice; the relation between law and freedom; due process and fairness in any legal system. This course is designed to have special relevance for those considering law as a career. POL 101 or equivalent recommended. (OC).

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 307     Forensic Anthropology     3 Credit Hours

Forensic anthropology has recently seen a lot of exposure through popular television shows like CSI and Bones. Have you ever wondered how much of what you were seeing was real? Do the dead really "talk" about their lives and how they died? This course is designed as an introductory course for students interested in demystifying and getting to know the real forensic anthropology. Forensic anthropology is a specialized sub-field of biological anthropology that applies many of the methods of biological anthropology to the discovery, excavation, and identification of human remains in a medico-legal context. In this class we learn about the human skeleton and explore the key methods that are used in the identification of individuals, such as age-at-death estimation, sex determination, stature, ancestry, and personal identification. We also deal with assessment of the different types of trauma, and whether or not we can tell the cause and manner of death. The broader ethical roles and responsibilities of forensic anthropologists are also discussed, including discussions of how we determine race/ancestry, as well as ethical responsibilities we have during the investigation of human rights abuses, disasters and criminal inquiries. (F)

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

CRJ 308     Moral and Political Dilemmas     3 Credit Hours

This course focuses on the tensions and relations between personal morality and political action by examining the moral aspect of contemporary policy issues such as the right to life, environmental policy, and discrimination. POL 101 or equivalent recommended. (YR).

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 309     Introduction to Law & Society     3 Credit Hours

Law and Society is a field of study that examines the interaction between the legal system and society from the perspective of the social sciences and humanities. This course focuses on core components of the legal system including courts, lawmaking bodies, regulatory administration, alternative dispute resolution systems, and the legal profession. Throughout the course, students develop the ability to examine the legal system and its relationship to equality, social change, and public benefits using social science evidence. (YR)

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

CRJ 316     The American Judicial Proces     3 Credit Hours

An analysis of American legal institutions, processes, doctrines, and their relationship to the formulation of public policy and the solution of social problems. POL 101 or equivalent recommended. (AY).

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 322     Psychology of Prejudice     3 Credit Hours

A consideration of ethnic (including racial, sexual, and religious) prejudice from the psychological point of view, focusing on the mind of both the oppressor and the oppressed. (AY).

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 170 or PSYC 171 or PSYC 101

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 323     Urban Politics     3 Credit Hours

A survey of the political process in urban areas, giving special attention to the changing roles of cities in American politics. POL 100 or equivalent recommended. (YR).

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 325     Psyc of Interpersonal Relation     3 Credit Hours

This course presents an overview of theory and research conducted by social psychologists that has been aimed at understanding interactions between individuals. Topics include an exploration of the research process that is used to investigate interpersonal relationships, the processes underlying social perception, friendship, liking, love, close relationships, aggression and violence in interpersonal relationships. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 170 or PSYC 171 or PSYC 101

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 335     Philosophy of Law     3 Credit Hours

An examination of some of the important philosophical issues relevant to law and legal theory, including legal punishment, legal responsibility, and the relationship between law and morality. Both classical and contemporary writings will be studied. Prerequisite: a previous philosophy course or permission of instructor. (AY).

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 350     Poverty and Inequality     3 Credit Hours

In a middle class-oriented culture, the poor experience many problems and are also considered deviant, which tend to make poverty self-perpetuating. This stratum will be explored with respect to life styles, life changes, contributing factors, characterisics, individual and social consequences, and evaluation of attempted solutions. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 362     Women, Politics, and the Law     3 Credit Hours

An examination of the political behavior of women in American politics. Included is an analysis of the legal and legislative demands of American women. (AY).

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate
Can enroll if College is Arts, Sciences, and Letters

CRJ 363     Crim Justice Syst and Policy     3 Credit Hours

The structure and processes of criminal justice administration in America, including analysis of current issues in police behavior, courts, and corrections. POL 101 or equivalent recommended. (AY).

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 369     US Civil Rights Movement     3 Credit Hours

A survey of race relations and civil rights activity from the late 19th century to the present. The principal focus, however, is on the period since World War II, especially on the mass-based Southern civil rights movement (1955-1965) and the various policy debates and initiatives of the past thirty years, most notably affirmative action and busing. We also examine critiques of non-violence and integrationism. (AY).

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 382     Social Psychology     3 Credit Hours

An introductory study of interrelationships of the functioning of social systems and the behavior and attitudes of individuals. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 170 or PSYC 171 or SOC 200 or SOC 201 or PSYC 101

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 390     Topics in Criminal Justice     3 Credit Hours

Examination of problems and issues in selected areas of criminal justice. Title as listed in the Schedule of Classes will change according to content. Course may be repeated when specific topics differ. (OC)

CRJ 403     Minority Groups     3 Credit Hours

The status of racial and ethnic minorities in the United States with particular reference to the social dynamics involved with regard to majority-minority relations. Topics of study include inequality, segregation, pluralism, the nature and causes of prejudice and discrimination and the impact that such patterns have upon American life. (F, W).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 407     Psychology of Adolescence     3 Credit Hours

Considers adolescence as an interaction of rapid biological and social change. Examines the theoretical and empirical literature in some detail. Prerequisite or permission of instructor. (F, W).

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 170 or PSYC 171 or PSYC 101

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 408     Police and the Community     3 Credit Hours

This course examines the diverse roles of the public police and how to achieve effective community policinig. After reviewing the evolution of community policing, this course focuses on understanding police mission and culture, involving the community, proactive policing, implementing community policing, communicating with a diverse population, the challenge of gangs, forming partnerships with the media, and building parternships in the community. (F, W)

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 200

CRJ 409     Intel and Homeland Security     3 Credit Hours

Full Title: Intelligence and Homeland Security This course will provide an in-depth examination of the principles that guide the collection, analysis, and sharing of intelligence in the United States and how these principles impact homeland security. Topics will include the US Intelligence community (CIA, FBI, military intelligence), the National Criminal Intelligence Sharing plan, the National Intelligence Strategy, and the recent emphasis placed on Intelligence-Led Policing. Emphasis will also be placed on the increased role thta local and state law enforcement agencies as well as private sector entities play in contributing to the assessment of threats to homeland security. (F,W,S)

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 200

CRJ 410     Quantitative Research     4 Credit Hours

An introduction to methods of data collection and analysis. Also discussion of research design and the philosophy of social science. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 412     Men and Masculinities     3 Credit Hours

This course addresses the question, "What is a man?" in various historical, cross-cultural, and contemporary contexts. A major focus on the social and cultural factors that underlie the shape and conceptions of manhood and masculinity in America as well as in a variety of societies around the globe. (AY)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201 or ANTH 101 or WST 275 or WGST 275 or PSYC 275 or SOC 275 or ANTH 275 or HUM 275 or WGST 303 or PSYC 303 or SOC 303 or ANTH 303 or HUM 303

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 413     American Constitutional Law     3 Credit Hours

A major theme of this course is the development of the constitution, especially focusing on the themes of judicial review: judicial self-restraint and judicial activism; the expansion of executive and legislative powers; and the rise of "substantive due process of law." POL 101 or equivalent recommended. (AY).

Prerequisite(s): POL 101

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 4130     Qualitative Research Methods     3 Credit Hours

Qualitative research methods involve the observation and study of people in their everyday lives, in their taken-for-granted worlds. Qualitative research seeks to combine close empirical observation with analytic techniques that demand (and teach) personal and social self- consciousness as necessary to an understanding of the social world of "others". This course in qualitative methods is designed to acquaint students with field research theories and techniques. Students will gain hands-on experience in participant observation, interviewing, and the use of sociological scholarship. Qualitative Reserach Methods will prepare students to gather data, focus the data in a social scientific manner, analyze the data, and then organize it in reportable form. (F, W).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 308

CRJ 414     Civil Rights and Liberties     3 Credit Hours

An analysis of the Bill of Rights and the 14th Amendment, with particular emphasis upon recent landmark or controversial Supreme Court decisions dealing with freedom of speech and religion, rights of criminal defendants; cruel and unusual punishment, right to privacy; civil rights and equal protection clause; and apportionment. POL 101 or equivalent recommended. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): POL 101

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 415     Restorative Justice     3 Credit Hours

This course explores the practice of restorative justice as it has been engaged in historical and contemporary criminal justice contexts. Topics addressed include the principles and philosophies underlying restorative justice, differences between retributive and restorative models, victim-offender dialogue, and offender reintegration. Students will be asked to think critically about restorative and retributive systems and to apply these concepts to develop their own approach to restorative justice.

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 200

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior

CRJ 416     Criminal Law     3 Credit Hours

A survey of the major judicial, executive, and legislative decisions in the field of criminal law. (AY)

Prerequisite(s): POL 101

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 417     Crimmigration     3 Credit Hours

Full Title: Crimmigration: Intersections of Immigration and Criminal Justice This course explores the intersection(s) of the criminal justice and immigration systems with special attention to race, class, and gender. It covers the evolution of American immigration policy and its application, the criminalization of immigrants, immigrant offending and victimization, the policing of immigrant communities, and the immigrant experience in the United States.

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 200 or CRJ 468 or CRJ 473 or SOC 200 or SOC 201

CRJ 418     CJ Research Methods     4 Credit Hours

Full Title: Criminal Research Methods This course provides an introduction to methods of data collection and analysis, as well as a discussion of research design and the philosophy of social science, within the context of the field of Criminology and Criminal Justice. Attention is give to quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methodologies.

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 200 and CRJ 468

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior

CRJ 421     Group Processes     3 Credit Hours

Topics treated include group cohesiveness, "group think," the social structure of groups, emotional factors in group life, leadership, and development of groups. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 170 or PSYC 171 or SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 423     American Social Classes     3 Credit Hours

Stratification of American communities and society: a review of the findings of major studies and an introduction to methodology. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 425     Lab in Social Psychology     4 Credit Hours

A broad introduction to research methods in basic and applied social psychology. Students will receive training in construction, implementation, and interpretation of scientific procedures used in the study of social psychology. Topics include: questionnaire construction, experimental design, and various multivariate analytic techniques. (AY).

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 381*

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 43010     Legal Ethics     3 Credit Hours

This course will explore the many ethical dilemmas faced by professionals in the legal system. We will pay particular attention to the criminal justice system and to the Rules of Professional Conduct for attorneys. Some of the questions we may address are: How should an attorney consider his/her own ethical beliefs when deciding the appropriate course of action in a case? How should a judge consider his/her own ethical beliefs when making a juvenile justice decision? How should a police officer determine the ethical course of action when the law's instructions are ambiguous? (F,W)

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Graduate

CRJ 435     Urban Sociology     3 Credit Hours

A descriptive study of the form and development of the urban community with respect to demographic structure, spatial and temporal patterns, and functional organization. The relationship of city and hinterland. Social planning and its problems in the urban community. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 440     Abnormal Psychology     3 Credit Hours

An introduction to the field of psychopathology, the study of mental disorders. Includes exposure to a number of historical and theoretical perspectives, each with their own theories, methodologies, and treatment approaches. Disorders covered will include: anxiety and mood disorders, personality disorders, schizophrenia, sexual disorders, and psychosomatic disorders. (F, W).

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 170 or PSYC 171 or PSYC 101

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 443     Gender Roles     3 Credit Hours

This course will investigate the development of gender roles in childhood and adolescence due to either innate physiological differences or sociological patterning, the effect of gender roles upon male-female relationships within our society, and the possibility of transcending sociological gender roles in alternate modes of living. (F,W).

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 170 or PSYC 171 or SOC 200 or SOC 201 or PSYC 101

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 445     Contemporary Ethical Theory     3 Credit Hours

An intensive study of a topic in recent ethical theory. Topics will vary with each offering. Among the topics: ethics and law, utilitarianism, virtue theory, theories of justice, morality and emotion, ethics and partiality. (AY).

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 240

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 446     Marriage and Family Problems     3 Credit Hours

Sociological analysis of problems encountered within the institution of marriage with particular reference to such issues as choosing a marriage partner, sexual adjustment, occupational involvement, conflict resolution, child rearing, divorce and readjustment. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 447     Family Violence     3 Credit Hours

Sociological analysis of various forms of family violence which occur disproportionately in the lives of girls and women. Topics such as incest, sexual abuse, date rape, wife battering, and elder abuse will be situated within the social and cultural context of contemporary gender relationships. Social and political responses to the phenomena will be examined. Permission of instructor is an optional prerequisite. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201 or SOC 301 or SOC 443 or PSYC 405 or WST 405

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 453     Sociology of Law     3 Credit Hours

Various aspects of the relationship between law and society are explored. After a look at processes of law making, attention is turned to the administration of law. This involves a study of the activities of legislatures, courts, police, and correctional agents. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 455     Immigrant Cultures and Gender     3 Credit Hours

The history and culture of immigration since 1850, including: (1) formation and perseverance of immigrant communities and interethnic boundaries; (2) relations between the homeland and the immigrant; and (3) impact of migration on family life and gender roles. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 and junior or senior standing. (AY).

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 101 or WST 275 or WGST 275 or PSYC 275 or SOC 275 or ANTH 275 or HUM 275 or WGST 303 or PSYC 303 or SOC 303 or ANTH 303 or HUM 303

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 460     Law & Culture     3 Credit Hours

This course explores the ways in which legal norms, and processes are shaped by the societies in which they are created. Issues discussed may include the role of culture in criminal defenses, conflicts between religious and secular law, and how race, gender and ethnicity impact engagement with the law as lawyers and as clients. The class addresses anthropological and sociological theories about the nature of law and disputes, examines related studies of legal structure in non-Western cultures, and considers the uses of sociology and anthropology in studying our own legal system. By examining individual legal institutions in the context of their particular cultural settings, students can begin to make cross-cultural comparisons and contrasts. In doing so, the class confronts the challenge of interpreting and understanding the legal rules and institutions of other cultures while assessing the impact of our own social norms and biases. (W)

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior

CRJ 461     Cops & Cons: Women in Prison     3 Credit Hours

Course uses contemporary theories of gendered organizations to frame analyses of prison policies and practices in employment and incarceration as they reflect and reproduce gender inequalities. Analyses will be framed within a restorative justice model, that is, a critique of the current criminal justice system of retributive justice and a paradigm of what a alternative system could be.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201 or WST 275 or CRJ 240 or CRJ 300 or WGST 275 or PSYC 275 or SOC 275 or ANTH 275 or HUM 275 or WGST 303 or PSYC 303 or SOC 303 or ANTH 303 or HUM 303

CRJ 465     Deviant Behavior/Soc Disorganz     3 Credit Hours

General analysis of the concepts of social deviance and social disorganization: factors producing each condition, the effects of social control measures on the course of deviance and disorganization, consequences for the social system, and the relationship between the two concepts. (YR)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 466     Drugs, Alcohol, and Society     3 Credit Hours

Analyses of the sociology of substance use and abuse. Provides a sociological framework for understanding issues and evaluating our nation's responses to the phenomenon of drug use. Drawing on sociocultural and social psychological perspectives, this course systematically examines the social structure, social problems, and social policy aspects of drugs in American society. Prerequisite or permission of instructor. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior

CRJ 467     Drugs, Crime, and Justice     3 Credit Hours

Provides a comprehensive analysis of the current state of research on interactions between crime and drug abuse. Examines drug distribution, organization of drug systems, and mechanisms of social control of drug systems. Analyzes the social problems associated with drugs and crime. The course also focuses on drug-law enforcement and public policy strategies for dealing with drugs and crime. Prerequisite or permission of instructor. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior

CRJ 468     Criminology     3 Credit Hours

Analysis of criminal behavior in relationship to the institutional framework of society. Emphasis upon the more routinized and persistent forms of criminality along with the joint roles played by victims, the criminal, the police, and all other relevant parties. (F,W)

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 469     Juvenile Delinquency     3 Credit Hours

The analysis of juvenile delinquent behavior in relationship to the institutional framework of society. Emphasis on the extent, causes, and methods of juvenile delinquency in the United States. (YR)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

CRJ 470     Current Issues in Crim Justice     3 Credit Hours

Current issues in the field of criminal justice and law enforcement in the U.S. and other countries. Topics include an evaluation of police activities, problems of apprehensions and prosecution, the courts and the correctional system, and the efficacy of the legal structure in its social context. (F,W,S).

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 200

CRJ 471     Comp Crim Justice Systems     3 Credit Hours

Description, analysis, and evaluation of selected criminal justice systems throughout the world. Course focuses on the various systems, theories, structures, methods and functions, including common law systems and socialist law systems. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 200

CRJ 472     Correctional Systems     3 Credit Hours

Analysis of the legal, social, and political issues affecting contemporary correctional theory and practice. Topics covered include the history of corrections; the nature of existing institutions; the functions and social structure of correctional institutions; and alternatives to institutional incarceration, probation, and parole. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 200

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 473     Race, Crime and Justice     3 Credit Hours

This course is an analysis of race and its relation to crime in the criminal justice system. Students will analyze and interpret the perceived connection between race and crime, while exploring the dynamics of race, crime, and justice in the United States. This course is designed to familiarize students with current research and theories of racial discrimination within America's criminal justice system.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

CRJ 474     Cyber Crimes     3 Credit Hours

This course in a hands-on approach investigating cyber crimes (e.g. child exploitation, predators, sexual/vice crimes, identity theft, etc.). Students will explore and discuss legal cases involving cyber technology and predatory practices and review applicable evidentiary rules. Students will also analyze the practical and ethical considerations that apply to undercover internet operations, and evidence collection and use to locate and apprehend offenders.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200

CRJ 475     Digital Evidence     3 Credit Hours

This course is a detailed approach to how computers and networks function, how they can be involved in virtually any type of crime, and how they can be used as a source of evidence. Students will analyze relevant legal issues and specific investigative and forensic processes related to technology. This course examines how deductive criminal profiling, a systemic approach to focusing an investigation and understanding criminal motivations, is utilized to locate and apprehend offenders.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200

CRJ 476     Inside Out Prison Exchange     4 Credit Hours

This community-based course, taught in a local correctional facility, brings university students and incarcerated students together to study as peers. Together students explore issues of crime and justice, drawing on one another to create a deeper understanding of how these issues affect our lives as individuals and as a society. The course creates a dynamic partnership between UMD and a correctional facility to allow students to question approaches to issues of crime and justice in order to build a safer and more just society for all. The course encourages outside (UMD) students to contextualize and to think deeply about what they have learned about crime and criminals and to help them pursue the work of creating a restorative criminal justice system; it challenges inside students to place their life experiences into larger social contexts and to rekindle their intellectual self-confidence and interest in further education.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior

CRJ 478     Criminal Justice Internship     3 to 6 Credit Hours

Provides field experience in social welfare or criinal justice agencies, e.g., for children/adolescents, in residential programs, in abuse remediation, in probation, for chemical dependencies, in victim advocacy, for the elderly, in prisons, for special needs populations, in court services, in medical/public health, in police services, and for families and communities. Supervision by approved field instructors. An internship of 80 hours is required for three (3) credits. Instructor and student will work together to determine appropriate intern placement. Approval of instructor. (F,W).

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 200

CRJ 479     Women's Studies Internshp     3 Credit Hours

Provides field experience in social welfare agencies, e.g., for children/adolescents, abuse, chemical dependencies, the elderly, special needs populations, criminal justice/probation, medical/public health, and families and communities. Supervision by approved field instructors. Focus is on analysis of the social context of agency, the clients, and staff. An internship of 80 hours is required for three (3) credits. Prerequisite: WGST 275 and permission of the Women's Studies Director is required. (F, W).

Prerequisite(s): WST 275

CRJ 480     Criminal Justice Theory     3 Credit Hours

Criminal Justice theorists study of formal and informal mechanisms of social control in specific places, such as bars and night clubs, city parks, schools and shopping malls. Students in this course will learn to apply their theories to practical, real life situations to achieve behavioral changes among individuals and groups toward the objective of effective crime control.

CRJ 481     Terrorism & US Natl Security     3 Credit Hours

The United States responded to the events of September 11, 2001 with a series of unprecedented action under the umbrella of homeland security and the ?War on Terror.? This course examines American National security policy by asking a few key questions: What is terrorism and how does it threaten the United States? How has the United States responded to the threat of terrorism over time? What have the consequences of US policy been to date? Finally, how would we balance a desire for security with our desire for civil liberties and ethical action?

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 468

CRJ 482     Legal Ethics     3 Credit Hours

This course will explore the many ethical dilemmas faced by professionals in the legal system. We will pay particular attention to the criminal justice system and to the Rules of Professional Conduct for attorneys. Some of the questions we may address are: How should an attorney consider his/her own ethical beliefs when deciding the appropriate course of action in a case? How should a judge consider his/her own ethical beliefs when making a juvenile justice decision? How should a police officer determine the ethical course of action when the law's instructions are ambiguous?

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore or Junior or Senior
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 483     Justice, Crime and Environment     3 Credit Hours

This service-learning course focuses on environmental justice and law. Environmental Justice is defined as the fair treatment of all people with respect to the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws. In the classroom, students learn the theory, history, and enforcement of environmental laws and regulations in Detroit, Michigan, and nationwide. In a required civic engagement project, students apply their substantive knowledge to solve local environmental problems. Through classroom learning and projects with community organizations, students connect law and justice concerns to Detroit's environmental problems.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior

CRJ 484     White Collar Crime     3 Credit Hours

This course reviews the history, categories, and problems related to white-collar crime. The course covers these topics by incorporating both legal and empirical perspectives in the study of white collar crime. In this course, we will focus on the substantive and procedural white collar crime laws ('law on the books') and analyze real white collar crime cases. Simultaneously, we will pay special attention to the dynamic relationship between white collar crime and the American regulatory framework. As a result, we will assess the relationship and differences between various types of white collar crime and the regulatory regimes that oversee the business sector ('law in action'). (OC)

CRJ 485     Psychology Internship     3 or 6 Credit Hours

The psychology internship offers experience in a wide variety of placements dealing with human services. These include programs related to child abuse, crisis intervention, geriatrics, human resources/staff development, mental retardation, probation departments, teenage runaways, substance abuse, and women's issues. The program is designed for juniors and seniors with a concentration in psychology or behavioral sciences and involves training in listening and helping skills. Written permission of instructor required. (F,W).

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 170 or PSYC 171 or PSYC 101

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior

CRJ 486     Criminalistics: CSI to Justice     3 Credit Hours

This course is a hands-on approach to learning about crime scene investigation. The course takes the student from the first response on the crime scene to documenting crime scene evidence and preparing evidence for courtroom presentation. It includes topics such as arson, homicide, suicide, and felony murder. CRJ 486 examines how the police conduct successful investigations, how the associated crime scene evidence is collected, and how to use the evidence to locate, apprehend, and prosecute the suspect.

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 200

CRJ 487     Forensic Science     3 Credit Hours

This class is a study of the increasing use of scientific evidence in criminal cases, gathered by crime scene investigators (CSI) and/or later developed in a crime laboratory. After a review of the history and development of forensic scientific evidence, the class will study the standards used by courts to prevent the admission of so-called "junk science" and the emergence of DNA as a new model for forensic science evidence. Several common forms of scientific evidence, beginning with DNA, will be studied, including fingerprints, handwriting, hair, bite marks, ballistics, fire and arson debris, and blood stains. The study also includes the forensic use of social sciences testimony, including the reliability of eyewitness testimony and several forms of abuse "syndrome" testimony. Each of these forms of evidence will be described and then compared to the "junk science" standards and to the most recent information about their reliability. The class will examine the impact of forensic science evidence or juroors and the so-called "CSI Effect". The reaction of courts, attorneys and police to juror expectations for scientific evidence will be reviewed. Finally, the class will review the impact of DNA exonerations and the National Academy of Sciences report on the reliability of forensic science evidence and how judges and appeals courts are responding to those challenges, particularly the current controversies concerning over the validity of such violence. (W)

CRJ 488     Criminal Procedure     3 Credit Hours

This class is a study of Constitutional law regarding criminal procedure in the United States. Initially the class reviews the federal and state court structure relating to criminal prosecutions and the flow of cases through those systems. The focus is then on the nature of individual rights under the Constitution, the case law, and the concept of the "exclusionary rule." The class then examines specific issues and procedures relating to arrests, searches, confessions and identifications, and analyzes the constitutional requirements for each. (W)

CRJ 489     Law, Crime, and Society     3 Credit Hours

This course will incorporate both legal and empirical perspectives to emphasize the dynamic relationship between law, crime, and society. In this course, we will focus on the substantive and procedural criminal law ('law on the books') while we simultaneously focus on empirical research of enforcement, case processing and sentencing in the criminal justice system (the 'law in action'). As a result, we will assess the relationship and differences between what the criminal law says 'on the books' and the criminal justice system 'in action'.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore or Junior or Senior

CRJ 490     Topics in Criminal Jusice     3 Credit Hours

Examination of problems and issues in selected areas of criminal justice. Title as listed in Schedule of Classes will change according to the content of the course. Course may be repeated when specific topics differ.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

CRJ 494     Pol Sci Internship Seminar     3 or 6 Credit Hours

This is the academic part of the internship. Students must meet with other interns once a week to analyze political dynamics within their placements. Students are required to keep journals, prepare papers and reports, and do other written work. Anyone taking POL 495 or 496 is required to take POL 494. It may not be taken by itself. Repeatable if topic differs. Only six hours of internship credit is allowable toward concentration requirement. (F,W,S).

CRJ 495     Political Science Internship     3 to 6 Credit Hours

Field study placements in national, state, local government or private agencies. Primarily for junior or senior political science concentrators or other qualified applicants. Maximum of 20 students selected each term. Students must also register for CRJ 494. Only six hours of internship is allowed toward concentration requirement. (F,W,S).

CRJ 497     Washington, D.C. Internship     3 to 6 Credit Hours

Field placements in Washington, D.C. Course is offered only in summer semester. Primarily for junior or senior political science concentrators or other qualified applicants. Only six hours of internship credit is allowed toward concentration requirement.

CRJ 498     Directed Studies     1 to 6 Credit Hours

Directed individual study of any subject agreed upon by the student and the instructor. May not duplicate a formal course offering.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

 
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An asterisk denotes that a course may be taken concurrently.

Frequency of Offering

The following abbreviations are used to denote the frequency of offering: (F) fall term; (W) winter term; (S) summer term; (F, W) fall and winter terms; (YR) once a year; (AY) alternating years; (OC) offered occasionally