Humanities (HUM)

HUM 100     Introduction to Humanities     3 Credit Hours

An introduction to the visual arts, music, and drama in western and world societies. Through study of individual works, the course teaches appreciation of the arts in their aesthetic and technical qualities, and understanding of the arts as expressions of diverse societies, varied historical conditions, and shared human experiences. (YR).

HUM 170     Studies in Humanities     3 Credit Hours

An interdisciplinary examination of selected key ideas in contemporary western thought. Emphasis will be placed upon how the issues and problems in question manifest themselves in popular and high culture. (YR).

HUM 171     Styles in 19th Century     3 Credit Hours

An introduction to the two principal styles of the 19th century, romanticism and realism, viewed within the general evolution of European civilization. After reading works of the classical tradition, the class will study masterpieces that illustrate the romantic and realist movements. (OC).

HUM 200     The Human Condition     3 Credit Hours

The human condition as seen in selected works of philosophy and literature. Typical issues: the meaning of life, the existence of God, moral responsibility for human actions, and the role of society in promoting or hindering human excellence. (YR).

HUM 201     Religions of the World     3 Credit Hours

A study of religion in essence, in manifestation, and in relationship with the other dimensions of culture; a treatment of man's religious interests and the various ways in which he has sought to pursue these interests. Surveys major world religions. (OC).

HUM 221     Great Books I: Ancient World     3 Credit Hours

Introduction to masterpieces of Western world literature from the ancient world. Readings include the Bible, Iliad, Odyssey, Greek drama, and Roman authors. (YR).

HUM 222     Gr Bks II: Midd Ages and Ren     3 Credit Hours

Introduction to masterpieces of Western world literature from the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Readings include Dante, Chaucer, Wolfram, Cervantes, Shakespeare, Moliere, and Racine. (YR).

HUM 223     Gr Bks III: Modern Era     3 Credit Hours

Introduction to masterpieces of Western world literature from the Modern Era. Readings include Swift, Voltaire, Rousseau, English romantic poets, fiction and drama of the 19th and 20th century. (YR).

HUM 240     Film and Society     3 Credit Hours

A survey of the major genres of film, chiefly in historical and political perspective, but also in light of important intellectual frameworks (e.g., feminism, psychoanalytical theory). The films selected, both Western and non-Western, will be examined both for their visual codes of meaning and for their wider role in developing a powerful social language in various cultural contexts. (OC).

HUM 248     Introduction to Screen Studies     3 Credit Hours

This course will introduce students to the development of world cinema by integrating the aesthetics of film with its technology, and its social and economic milieu. It will train the students in analyzing the formalist qualities of the medium, and in understanding the evolution of its various genres and styles. (YR).

HUM 261     Honors: West Cult I: Origins     3 Credit Hours

First in a series of four courses. An interdisciplinary course describing the nature of the Western classical and Biblical traditions. Will examine Western values, attitudes, history, art history, the roots of scientific thought, logic, and social institutions such as the family and the state. Included will be works of literature, history, philosophy, and art history. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): HIST 365

HUM 262     Honors: Western Culture II     3 Credit Hours

Second of four courses on Western Civilization required of all Honors students. Course covers the period of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Reformation. Focus is on ways in which the Biblical and Classical traditions are preserved, adapted, transformed, or discarded under the pressures of new social and political formations. Materials will be drawn from literature, philosophy, political theory, and art of the period. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): HIST 365

HUM 263     Honors: Western Cult III     3 Credit Hours

Third of four courses on Western Culture required of all Honors students. Course covers period from 17th to 19th centuries. Focus is on the emergence of scientific thought, Enlightenment political theory, Romantic individualism, and the great 19th-century intellectual revolutions of Darwinism, Marxism, and feminism. Material will be drawn from literature, philosophy, and political and scientific writings of the period. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): HIST 365

HUM 264     Honors: West Cult IV: Mod Era     3 Credit Hours

Fourth of four courses in Western Culture required of all Honors students. Course covers period from late 19th century to present. Focus is on selected major issues of Western civilization in the modern era: science and human values, bureaucratic and totalitarian societies, psychoanalytical thought, feminism, nihilism, existentialism. (AY).

Prerequisite(s): HIST 365

HUM 270     Intro to Africana Studies     3 Credit Hours

This gateway course in the AAAS Minor will engage the students in the intellectual issues, historical perspectives and cultural debates in African and African American Studies. Using a trans-disciplinary approach the AAAS faculty teaching this course as a team will draw from the disciplinary strengths of the Humanities, the Social Sciences and the Behavioral Sciences. Texts will include literature, film, music, art, theater, and other forms of popular and folk culture. The course will routinely invite speakers and performers to the class and engage the campus community in these events. (YR)

HUM 290     Topics in Humanities     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Examination of problems and issues in selected areas of the humanities. Title as listed in Schedule of Classes will change according to content. Course may be repeated when specific topics differ. (OC).

HUM 300     Intro to AAAS     3 Credit Hours

This gateway course in the African and African American Studies Program introduces students to the intellectual debates, historical perspectives and cultural issues central to the field of African and African American Studies. The course readings draw from the disciplinary strengths of the Humanities as well as the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Course materials include selections from literature, film, music, art, drama, folk and popular culture. The course content is supplemented by attendance at off-campus events and visits to institutions featuring significant aspects of African and African American history and culture.

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

HUM 303     Intro to Women's & Gender Stud     3 Credit Hours

This course provides an interdisciplinary overview of the key theories and topics in Women's and Gender Studies. Special attention is given to how gender intersects with class, race, nationality, religion and sexuality to structure women's and men's lives. Students are also introduced to methods of gender analysis and will begin to apply these methods to topics such as women and health, gender roles in the family, violence against women, and gendered images in the mass media.

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

HUM 304     Studies in Det.Hist. & Culture     3 Credit Hours

This interdisciplinary course explores the political, social, and cultural histroy of Detroit by examining ways various groups and classes have interacted with and been shaped by structures of power and influence. The course highlights trade and commerce, newcomers, and the influence of organizations and institutions within the contexts of labor, race, ethnic, and religous histories and current affairs, and examines how these fit into the evolution of Detroit from the 19th century to the present. Where pertinent the influence of national and international movements included.

HUM 305     The Arts & Culture of Detroit     3 Credit Hours

This interdisciplinary course explores the modern and contemporary cultural history of Detroit, examining the ways in which various population groups have been creative from the nineteenth century to the present. The course highlights the work of architects, designers, photographers, visual artists, poets, and musicians, and situates them in the broader cultural context of American art and history.

HUM 311     Art of China     3 Credit Hours

An introduction to the civilization of traditional China through the historical presentation of its art forms, literary achievements, and philosophical structures. The course will survey the Buddhist, Daoist, and Confucian content of Chinese art and culture from the Shang to the Qing dynasties.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 101 or ARTH 102 or ARTH 103 or ARTH 104 or ARTH 106 or HUM 100 or HUM 150 or HUM 170 or HUM 171 or HUM 200 or HUM 201 or HUM 221 or HUM 222 or HUM 223 or HUM 240 or HUM 261 or HUM 262 or HUM 263 or HUM 264 or HUM 275 or HUM 290

HUM 312     Art of Japan     3 Credit Hours

An introduction to Japanese culture through the historical presentation of its varied art forms. Drama, music and the fine arts are studied within the context of Buddhist and Shinto religious practices.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 101 or ARTH 102 or ARTH 103 or ARTH 104 or ARTH 106 or HUM 100 or HUM 150 or HUM 170 or HUM 171 or HUM 200 or HUM 201 or HUM 221 or HUM 222 or HUM 223 or HUM 240 or HUM 261 or HUM 262 or HUM 263 or HUM 264 or HUM 275 or HUM 290

HUM 313     Chinese Painting     3 Credit Hours

A historical survey of the painting of China from the earliest examples found in tombs through works influenced by the West from the modern period. Students will be introduced to Eastern philosophy and relevant literary genres which provide a context for the development of the Chinese painting tradition.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 101 or ARTH 102 or ARTH 103 or ARTH 104 or ARTH 106

HUM 315     Early Chinese Art and Archaeol     3 Credit Hours

An examination of the art and architecture of early China (Neolithic through Eastern Han). Recent excavations that have significantly changed our view of the early period will be given emphasis. Students will analyze relevant literary and philosophical texts in translation to enhance understanding of the cultural context.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 101 or ARTH 102 or ARTH 103 or ARTH 104 or ARTH 106

HUM 321     Popular Culture     3 Credit Hours

This course examines the art forms of contemporary popular culture, including rock 'n roll, movies, television, advertising design, and commercial architecture. Our critical inquiry emphasizes the development of the aesthetics and the myths of our modern mass media environment, as well as relationships between popular and "high" culture. (AY).

HUM 3335     Intro to Gospel Music     3 Credit Hours

This course explores the history and aesthetics of Black sacred music within cultural context. Major figures (Thomas A. Dorsey, Mahalia Jackson, The Winans Family, Kirk Franklin), periods (slavery, Great Migration, Civil Rights movement), and styles (folk and arranged Negro spirituals, congregational songs, and gospel songs - traditional to contemporary) will be studied through recording, videos, film and at least one field experience. Underlying the course is the theory (Mellonee Burnim and Pearl Williams-Jones) that gospel music is an expression of African American culture that fuses both African and European elements into a unique whole. (OC).

HUM 335     Women in Medieval Art     3 Credit Hours

Women have often been regarded as the second sex of the middle ages due to the misogynistic attitudes of that era. Recent scholarship, however, has unearthed a significantly more complex picture. Through a study of visual representations of women in medieval art, this course will examine women's roles in the creation and patronage of art and literature, economic and family issues, and women's participation in new and innovative forms of religious piety.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 101 or ARTH 102 or ARTH 103 or ARTH 104 or ARTH 106 or WGST 275 or WGST 303 or HUM 275 or HUM 303 or ANTH 275 or ANTH 303 or PSYC 275 or PSYC 303 or SOC 275 or SOC 303 or WST 275

HUM 337     Women Musicians/West Mus Hist     3 Credit Hours

Through a historical survey of female musicians from the Middle Ages to the present day, this course takes a critical look at theories of creativity and professionalism as they relate to female musical production. The course deals with women in European "art music" traditions and also in jazz and poplar music. Social and cultural norms dictating appropriate female involvement with music are examined. The historical approach will serve to reveal ways in which terms such as professionalism and virtuosity have continually shifted and changed in reference to female musical performance. The course challenges students to re-think many of the commonly accepted gender-based descriptions of particular genres and elements of music through listening and musical analysis.

Prerequisite(s): MHIS 100 or MHIS 120 or MHIS 130 or MTHY 100 or WGST 275 or PSYC 275 or HUM 275 or SOC 275 or ANTH 275 or WGST 303 or ANTH 303 or SOC 303 or PSYC 303 or HUM 303 or WST 275

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

HUM 343     Opera     3 Credit Hours

An introduction to the study of the musical genre of opera through consideration of major operas based upon literary and dramatic works. Covers examples of operas of all eras, from the time of Monteverdi to present. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): MHIS 100 or MHIS 120 or MHIS 130 or MHIS 311 or MHIS 312 or MHIS 313 or MHIS 331 or MHIS 340 or MHIS 341 or MHIS 342 or MHIS 390 or MTHY 100 or MTHY 101 or MTHY 102 or MTHY 301 or MTHY 302 or MTHY 390

HUM 3435     Adaptations of Literary Texts     3 Credit Hours

This course explores the adaptation of literary texts in a variety of literary genres (poetry, drama, fiction) to other artistic mediums (film, graphic novels/comics, paintings, etc.). Moving beyond limited comparisons of "good" originals and "bad" adaptations, this course focuses on the dialogue among multiple versions of the same story across a range of historical periods, asking how and why adaptations modify their sources in a particular manner. This course addresses the difference between adaptation and appropriation as well as imitation, quotation, allusion, pastiche, and parody.

Prerequisite(s): (ENGL 200 or ENGL 230 or ENGL 231 or ENGL 232 or ENGL 233 or ENGL 235 or ENGL 236 or ENGL 237 or ENGL 239) and (COMP 106 or COMP 220 or COMP 270 or COMP 280)

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

HUM 346     Bible and Western Tradition     3 Credit Hours

An examination of Biblical literature in various English translations, with emphasis on genres and the use of Biblical materials in European and American literature, art, and music. (OC).

HUM 348     Warriors, Lovers, and Saints     3 Credit Hours

An in-depth examination of various personalities of the Middle Ages, both historical and fictional, who are distinctive for their martial prowess, their reputation as lovers, their piety, or some combination of these traits. Attention to these figures (e.g., Roland, Tristan, St. Augustine, and Abelard) will enable the class to consider important medieval norms of behavior, such as chivalry, courtly love, and Christian faith.

Prerequisite(s): (COMP 106 or COMP 220 or COMP 270 or COMP 280 or CPAS with a score of 40) and (ENGL 200 or ENGL 230 or ENGL 231 or ENGL 232 or ENGL 233 or ENGL 235 or ENGL 236 or ENGL 237 or ENGL 239)

HUM 349     Bible In/As Literature     3 Credit Hours

This course will study selected readings from the Bible, first in regard to their own literary, historical, and cultural contents, and then in regard to their reception, interpretation, and reapplication by later literary tradition. Biblical selections may cover both the Old and New Testaments as well as Apocryphal traditions, while readings from later non-biblical texts will be drawn from various literary periods.

Prerequisite(s): (COMP 106 or COMP 220 or COMP 270 or CPAS with a score of 40) or COMP 280 and (ENGL 230 or ENGL 231 or ENGL 232 or ENGL 233 or ENGL 235 or ENGL 236 or ENGL 237 or ENGL 239 or ENGL 200)

HUM 355     Urban Voices: France and Italy     3 Credit Hours

This course is an interdisciplinary approach to the concepts of urban development and literary, visual and cultural responses to the process of urbanization mainly in Rome and Paris. The readings will illustrate how the city shaped the writers' creativity, as well as how their works interpret urbanization.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman

HUM 356     Reading Urban Monstrosity     3 Credit Hours

This course questions the literary techniques and forms the English writers developed between 1660 and 1900 to characterize and imagine London to be a unified community and to counter the growing perception of London as a "monstrous city." This image of "the English-speaking City" as an uncontrollable monster may be explored in writings by Daniel Defoe, Jane Austen, Elizabeth Gaskell, Robert Louis Stevenson, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, and Joseph Conrad.

Prerequisite(s): (COMP 106 or CPAS with a score of 40 or COMP 220 or COMP 280 or COMP 270) and (ENGL 200 or ENGL 230 or ENGL 231 or ENGL 232 or ENGL 233 or ENGL 235 or ENGL 236 or ENGL 237 or ENGL 239)

HUM 357     National Cinemas     3 Credit Hours

This course will introduce students to the national cinema of a select country. In contrasting the evolution of global cinema with the dominant genres and conventions of Hollywood, the course will enable students to critically examine non-Hollywood narratives; the interaction of various nationalist movements within the institution of cinema; and the ways in which world cinema has been inflected by various indigenous performance practices and other visual representations. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): FILM 240 or HUM 240 or FILM 248 or HUM 248 or ENGL 248

HUM 358     Shakespeare on Film     3 Credit Hours

HUM 366     Sexualities, Genders, & Bodies     3 Credit Hours

This course introduces key questions and debates in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer studies. Through engagement with multidisciplinary sources, students explore how sexualities, genders, and bodies are constructed and contested, how these constructions vary in diverse contexts and historical moments, and what gaps remain in our knowledge of LGBTQ lives. (YR)

HUM 371     Philosophy in Literature     3 Credit Hours

An exploration of philosophical problems as they are encountered in works of literature. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of the instructor. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 335 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 411 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

HUM 385     Black Cinema     3 Credit Hours

The course will examine selected films from African American and African film traditions in order to analyze how their cultural production is responsive to the conditions of social oppression, economic underdevelopment, and neo-colonialism. How film traditions define "Black aesthetics" will also be discussed. (AY).

HUM 388     W. African Music: Trad.&Glob.     3 Credit Hours

West African popular music contains a unique mixture of African, Cuban, European and American influences. With the advent of radio and recording, music that was once locally based is now part of a national and international popular music industry. This course offers an overview of modern West African music, both traditional and popular. The course begins with an introduction to traditional West African instruments and musical genres. Next, there is an exploration of the fusion of traditional African styles with European, Cuban and American styles during and after the colonial era. The course culminates with an examination of the contributions of West African musicians to the World Music scene, focusing on issues of representation and Fair Trade.

Prerequisite(s): MHIS 100 or MHIS 120 or MHIS 130 or MTHY 100 or AAAS 106 or AAAS 275 or HUM 100 or HUM 270

HUM 389     Nazi Germany     3 Credit Hours

The course traces the development of the Nazi movement from its ideological roots to Hitler's dictatorship, 1933-1945. Political events are interpreted in their social and cultural context to provide a comprehensive view of National Socialism. (OC).

HUM 390     Topics in Humanities     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Three Writers, Three Worlds: The Poetry of Eliot, Cesaire and Neruda. This course offers upper division students an intensive study of the works and lives of three poets who are considered among the greatest in their respective cultures and in the world: Pablo Neruda, Aime Cesaire, and T. S. Eliot. This will be an exploration of the artistic and aesthetic sensibilities of these poets, their development as intellectuals, the experiences that shaped their worldviews, and their engagement with significant historic movements or moments of the 20th Century.

HUM 395     Japanese Art I     4 Credit Hours

Japanese art from prehistoric Jomon period to end of Edo period, including painting, sculpture, architecture, and applied arts. Cultural developments on Asian mainland will be treated to provide proper placement of Japanese art within greater East Asian cultural context. Taught at the Japan Center for Michigan Universities, Hikone, Shiga Prefecture, Japan. (F).

HUM 396     Japanese Art II     4 Credit Hours

Continuation of Japanese Art I. Historical development of Japanese painting from Asuka to Edo periods. Approach both chronological and thematic in nature. Secular and religious painting will be discussed. Taught at the Japan Center for Michigan Universities, Hikone, Shiga, Prefecture, Japan. (W).

Prerequisite(s): HUM 395

HUM 3975     Humanities Thesis/Project     6 Credit Hours

The Humanities Thesis/Project is the culmination of the Humanities concentration, normally completed in the Senior year. Students will develop either a thesis or a research project designed to integrate and deepen their study of the three disciplines chosen for their concentration. The thesis will be done under the direction of one or more faculty members in their areas of concentration. The research project will normally be done in collaboration with a faculty member or with an external organization, as approved by the student's project supervisor. Restricted to students in the Humanities concentration who have completed nine hours of upper-division courses with a "Humanities" listing. (F,W,S).

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Senior

HUM 398     Independent Studies in Hum     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Readings or analytical assignments in the humanities in accordance with the needs and interests of those enrolled and agreed upon by the student and advising instructor. (F,W).

HUM 399     Independent Studies in Hum     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Readings or analytical assignments in the humanities in accordance with the needs and interests of those enrolled and agreed upon by the student and advising instructor. (F,W).

HUM 409     Feminist Theories     3 Credit Hours

This course examines the different perspectives that feminist theorists have offered to analyze the unequal conditions of women's and men's lives. Students taking this course will develop an understanding of how theory functions as a way to know, understand and change the world. They will also be provided with a lens for comparing the assumptions and implications of alternative theoretical perspectives. A particular emphasis of this course is on theorizing the interrelationships among gender, race, class, sexuality and nationality. Course material includes applications of feminist theory to issues such as gender identity formation; sexuality; gender, law and citizenship; women and work; and the history and politics of social movements. Students will not receive credit for both HUM 409 and HUM 509. (AY)

Prerequisite(s): WGST 275 or WST 275 or SOC 200 or SOC 201 or PSYC 275 or SOC 275 or ANTH 275 or HUM 275 or WGST 303 or PSYC 303 or SOC 303 or ANTH 303 or HUM 303

HUM 415     Existentialism and Its Sources     3 Credit Hours

An exploration of existentialism through the study of literary and philosophical texts. Particular themes such as freedom, commitment, alienation, and death will be considered in an attempt to formulate an existential conception of the human condition. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

HUM 433     Writing Women in Renaissance     3 Credit Hours

This course will be taught in English, and will focus on the influence of Italian literary models for the construction of female literary types as well as female voices in France and Italy from 1300 to about 1600. Italian authors studied include three very influential Florentines, Dante, Petrarch and Boccaccio, as well as Castiglione and Ariosto. We will read women poets, patrons, prostitutes and queens from Italy and France such as Veronica Gambara, Isabella di Morra, Vittoria Colonna, Christine de Pizan, Louise Labe, and Marguerite de Navarre. At issue will be women's roles and women's images in city and court culture during the early modern period, and the interaction of their writings with the literary canons of Italy and France. (OC).

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

HUM 434     Renaissance and Baroque Rome     3 Credit Hours

The return of the papacy in 1420 initiated the reemergence of Rome as a major cultural center. This course examines painting, sculpture, architecture, and urban planning in Rome from the 15th to the 17th century, including the work of Raphael, Michelangelo, Bernini, Borromini, and Caravaggio. Topics to be explored include the birth of Renaissance archaeology and antiquarianism; humanism and the papal curia; urban renewal and conservation; pilgrimage and sacred topography; the ?myth of Rome?; architecture of churches, villas, and palaces; tourism and the city as spectacle. This course is structured as a seminar that is writing and research-intensive. It is an interdisciplinary course that includes readings in literature, religion, urbanism history of art and architecture, and intellectual history.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 101 or ARTH 102 or ARTH 103 or ARTH 104 or ARTH 106

HUM 457     American Cinema     3 Credit Hours

This course will analyze how Hollywood as the nation's dream factory has manufactured fantasies and cultural myths that have constructed the image of American citizenship, both for Americans and non-Americans. It will establish the ideological function of Hollywood texts as providing unifying symbols for a fragmented society. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 248 or HUM 248 or FILM 248 or JASS 248

HUM 467     Script-Writing Workshop     3 Credit Hours

This writing intensive course will train students to compose a film script, focusing on the substance, structure, and style of an original screenplay. The course will be conducted as a workshop in which students will first study classic scripts (and films based on these) of the film-school generation of directors, then model scenes and sequences of their own scripts on the principles of the above texts, and finally, write their own respective film stories in accordance with an appropriate narrative structure and design. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): JASS 310 or COMM 310 or COMP 310 or ENGL 310

HUM 4705     Black Women / Lit, Film, Music     3 Credit Hours

This course will examine works produced by Black women authors, activists, filmmakers and musical performers in order to determine the methods they have incorporated in order to challenge and eradicate the prevailing stereotypes about Black women while advancing their their own personal and racial agendas. It will also focus on the extent to which race, gender, and class have shaped the creative work of Black women. Students will be required to read, discuss, analyze and write their own responses to the works of such firebrands as author Zora Neale Hurston, activist Ida B. Wells, filmmaker Julie Dash, and singer Billie Holliday.

Prerequisite(s): FILM 240 or FILM 248 or FILM 385 or AAAS 239 or AAAS 275 or HUM 303 or HUM 221 or HUM 222 or HUM 223 or ENGL 231 or ENGL 232 or ENGL 233 or ENGL 237 or ENGL 239 or ENGL 248 or ENGL 200 or ANTH 303 or PSYC 303 or SOC 303 or WGST 303

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate
Can enroll if College is Arts, Sciences, and Letters

HUM 477     Ethnographic Film     3 Credit Hours

This course will analyze ethnographic films as a medium for the construction of meaning in and across cultures. It will teach students to understand how the putatively "real" content of documentary film creates a mixture of fantasy, news and "science." Covering texts as varied as National Geographic photographic layouts, traditional ethnographic films made by anthropologists, and auto-ethnographies of cultural groups such as native Americans and the Trobriand Islanders of Papua, New Guinea, the course will aim to deconstruct such oppositions as indigene vs. alien, us vs. them, and self vs. other. Students cannot receive credit for both HUM 477 and HUM 577. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): FILM 248 or ENGL 248 or HUM 248 or ANTH 101 or JASS 248

HUM 485     Internship     3 to 6 Credit Hours

The Humanities Internship offers students experience in types of work available to liberal arts graduates. Attendance at individual conferences with the director and regular meeting of the Humanities/History Internship seminar is required. Credit applies to the degree as general elective and does not apply to concentrations, with the exception of Communications (3 credits if internship required toward major), Journalism and Screen Studies (3 credits if internship required toward major, with an additional 3 credits accepted as partial fulfillment of requirements in genres, modes and contexts), International Studies (3 credits of internship count toward cognate requirement), and Museum Studies (3 credit of internship count toward cognate requirement). Maximum total hours credit: 12. Graded Pass/Fail, (F, W, S)

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Sophomore or Junior or Senior

HUM 490     Topics in Humanities     3 to 4 Credit Hours

Examination of problems and issues in selected areas of the humanities. Title as listed in Schedule of Classes will change according to content. Course may be repeated for credit when specific topics differ. (OC).

HUM 497     Independent Studies in Hum     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Readings or analytical assignments in humanities in accordance with the needs and interests of those enrolled and agreed upon by student and advising instructor. (YR).

HUM 499     Directed Research     1 to 3 Credit Hours

See Humanities Concentration Advisor for more information.

 
*

An asterisk denotes that a course may be taken concurrently.

Frequency of Offering

The following abbreviations are used to denote the frequency of offering: (F) fall term; (W) winter term; (S) summer term; (F, W) fall and winter terms; (YR) once a year; (AY) alternating years; (OC) offered occasionally