Philosophy

The Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy uses reason to reflect upon the most basic and profound questions that human beings can ask.

Does life have a meaning? Is there a God? What is truth? How ought one to live one's life?

Philosophy teaches us how to think and write about these and other basic questions in a reasoned and critical fashion. Because philosophy deals with the fundamental issues that underlie all of our investigations into nature and ourselves, the study of philosophy serves students who are interested in the foundations of the sciences, arts, and social institutions.

The study of philosophy is an excellent preparation for graduate and professional school. Philosophy concentrators are more successful in being admitted to schools of law and medicine than students from almost any other field.

Members of the UM-Dearborn philosophy faculty are committed to excellence in both teaching and scholarly research. They are available both for formal advising and informal discussion. We at UM-Dearborn try to create a relaxed and friendly environment, a community of teachers and students dedicated to philosophical inquiry and discussion. Please call on us whenever we can help.

Please visit the Philosophy webpage for more information.

Pre-Major Requirements

PHIL 100Introduction to Philosophy3
PHIL 233Critical Thinking 13
or PHIL 234 Symbolic Logic
PHIL 240Ethics3
Total Credit Hours9

Dearborn Discovery Core Requirement

The minimum GPA for the program is 2.0. In addition, the DDC permits any approved course to satisfy up to three credit hours within three different categories. Please see the General Education Program: The Dearborn Discovery Core section for additional information.

Foundational Studies

Written and Oral Communication (GEWO) – 6 Credits

Upper Level Writing Intensive (GEWI) – 3 Credits

Quantitative Thinking and Problem Solving (GEQT) – 3 Credits

Critical and Creative Thinking (GECC) – 3 Credits

Areas of Inquiry

Natural Science (GENS) – 7 Credits

  • Lecture/Lab Science Course
  • Additional Science Course

Social and Behavioral Analysis (GESB) – 9 Credits

Humanities and the Arts (GEHA) – 6 Credits

Intersections (GEIN) – 6 Credits

Capstone

Capstone (GECE) – 3 Credits

Foreign Language Requirement

Complete a two-semester beginning language sequence.

Ancient Greek I and II MCL 105 and MCL 106
Arabic I and II ARBC 101 and ARBC 102
Armenian I and II MCL 111 and MCL 112
French I and II FREN 101 and FREN 102
German I and II GER 101 and GER 102
Latin I and II LAT 101 and LAT 102
Spanish I and II SPAN 101 and SPAN 102
Chinese I and II CHIN 101 and CHIN 102

Major Requirements

PHIL 301
PHIL 302
Ancient Philosophy
and Modern Philosophy
6
Alternative I or II
A student may choose either a traditional major in philosophy (Alternative I) or a program that stresses the relationship of philosophy to other areas of study (Alternative II).12-18
With regard to both Alternatives, students are strongly encouraged to work closely with a philosophy faculty adviser to develop a coherent program. Alternative I requires a total of 24 credit hours in philosophy (PHIL) courses at the upper level (300 or 400 level) and six upper-level hours from an approved list of cognate courses in one or more disciplines outside philosophy. Alternative II requires a total of 18 credit hours in philosophy courses at the 300 or 400 level and 12 credit hours upper-level of cognate courses from the approved list. Satisfactory completion of PHIL 301 Ancient Philosophy and PHIL 302 Modern Philosophy will be counted as part of the 24 hours in philosophy in Alternative I or as part of the 18 hours in philosophy in Alternative II.
Addition Notes: 1. A maximum of 44 credit hours in PHIL may count in the 120 hours required to graduate. 2. Credit cannot be given for both PHIL 234 and PHIL 350. 3. At least 15 credit hours of upper level Philosophy (PHIL) required for the major must be elected at UM-Dearborn.
Cognates (CALC)
As noted above, cognate requirements depend on the student's choosing between Alternative I and Alternative II. 6-12
List of approved Cognate courses (CALC):
Intro To Women's & Gender Stud
Body Image and Culture
Culture and Int'l Business
Anth of Health and Environment
Human Evolution
Introduction to Primates
Race and Evolution
Cultural Ecology and Evolution
Myth, Magic, and Mind
Indians of North America
African Exper in the Americas
Anthropology of Latin America
Anth Persp on the Middle East
Anthropology of Europe
Power & Privilege in SE Mich
Culture and Sexuality
Sexual Praxis and Theory
Human Body, Growth & Health
Men and Masculinities
Kinship and Marriage
Education and Culture
Narrative Anthropology
Medical Anthropology
Human Genetics
Religion and Culture
Political Anthropology
Anthropological Theory
Immigrant Cultures and Gender
Economic Anthropology
Ethnographic Film
Gender and Globalization
Psychological Anthropology
Contemporary Arabic Literature
The Arts & Culture of Detroit
Art of China
Art of Japan
Chinese Painting
Early Chinese Art and Archaeol
Egyptian Art
Greek Art
Roman Art
Gods, Myth and Worship
Erly Christian Byzan Art
Early Med and Romanesque Art
Gothic Art and Architecture
The 14th Century
Women in Medieval Art
Art&Arch in Early Ren Florence
High Renaissance and Mannerism
Renaissance & Reformation Art
Italian Renaissance Sculpture
Southern Baroque Art
Northern Baroque Art
Art of Glass
American Art
Impressionism and Post-Impress
Arts of the Twentieth Century
Picasso
Modern Architecture
The Modern Print
Contemporary Art
American Photography
Urban Design Perspectives
Islamic Architecture
Islamic Decorative Arts
Topics in Art History
Independent Studies
Senior Seminar
Earl Mod Jpn Paint&Wood Prnts
Women in Classical Antiquity
City of Ancient Rome
Greek Architecture
Rembrandt
Collage, Montage, Assemblage
Introduction to Toxicology
Current Topics in Biochemistry
Biochemical Pharmacology
Topics in Biochemistry
Comparative Animal Physiology
Ecology
General Genetics
Introduction to Neurobiology
Population Genetics & Evolutn
Epidemiology
Topics in Biology
Applied & Environ Microbiology
Diversity Issues Health Care
Behavior and Evolution
Advanced Field Ecology
Med & Env Toxicology
Origins of Biological Sciences
Environmental Chemistry
Introduction to Toxicology
Comparat. American Identities
Public Comm and Culture Stdies
Critical Media Studies
Principle of Organization Comm
Gender and Media Studies
Public Relations Campaigns
Prof Communication Ethics
Gender and Globalization
Modern European Short Fiction
Mod Eur Poetry in Translation
Modern Literature: the Novel
The Hero in Literature
How Writing Works
Economics of Pov and Discrm
Heterodox Economics
Literary Criticism
Narrative Journalism
British Lit: Beowulf to Milton
British Lit: Milton to 1900
American Lit: Colonial to 1900
Brit & Amer Lit: 1900-Present
Advanced Creative Writing
Advanced Exposition
Feature Writing
Online Reprtng,Resrch,Writing
Religion and Literature
Myth and Motif
Adaptations of Literary Texts
Modern Literature: Drama
Bible and Western Tradition
Classicl Lit/Engl Translation
The Bible In/As Literature
Reading Urban Monstrosity
Am Lit:1630 to Civil War
Am Lit:Civil War to WW I
Writing for Civic Literacy
20C/21C British/Amer Poetry
Narratives of Film and Lit
Engl Lit from Begin-1500
Engl Lit: 1500 to 1600
English Lit 1600-1660
Restoration and Early Eighteenth-Century LIterature
The Age of Johnson and Burney
Brit Lit in Romantic Era
Victorian Poetry and Prose
Intro to Postcolonial Studies
American English
Gender Issues in Literature
The Odyssey of Blk Men in Amer
Psychology and Theater
Independent Studies in English
Maj Engl Auth of the Mid Ages
Lit of Anglo-Saxon England
Medieval Mystical Writers
Chaucer
Studies in Medieval Lit/Cult
Shakespeare I: Earlier Works
Shakespeare II: Later Works
Maj Engl Authors of the Renais
Milton
Shakespeare's Contemporaries
Seventeenth-Century Readings
Maj Engl 18th-Century Authors
Swingers. Flirts, & Libertines
Satire
Restoration Drama
18th-Century English Novel
Stud in 19th-Century Brit Lit
British Romantic Writers
Victorian Writers
The Victorian Novel
Memoir and Travel Writing
Major 20C/21C Engl/Amer Auths
Major20C/21C English Authors
Studies in 20-21 Century Lit
Anglo-Irish Literature
Sem in 20C/21C Poetry
20C/21C Women Authors
Maj Am Auth to the Civ War
Maj Am Auth Civ War to WWI
Major 20C/21C American Authors
Contemporary American Novel
Postmodern Literature
Stud in 19th-Cent Amer Lit
Teaching Fiction
Modern English Grammar
Contemporary Rhetorical Theory
Discourse Analysis
Script-Writing Workshop
Writing Young Adult Fiction
Contemporary African Amer Lit
LGBTQ Literature
Reading in Multicult Contexts
Arab American Women Writers
Second Lang Acquisition: Engl
African American English
History of the English Lang
World Englishes
Queer Theory & Literature
Monsters, Women & the Gothic
Env Lit & Reps of Nature
Advanced Topics in English
Black Women / Lit, Film, Music
Environmental Science
Ecology
Urban Geography
Environmental Ethics
Global Climate Change
Environmental Politics
Environmental Economics
Environmental Psychology
Human Ecology
Ecological Economics
Comparative Enviro Policy
Env Lit & Reps of Nature
Frnch Lit: Md Ages-18 Century
French Lit: 19th-20th Century
Francophone Lit and Civil
Germ Lit: Classic and Romantic
Introduction to German Lit
Contemporary German Cultures
German Culture & Civilization
Intro to Global Cultures
Political Islam
Health Policy and Admin
Financing Health & Medical Sys
Medical Sociology
Medical Ethics
Comparative Health Care System
Health Care and the Law
The Study of History
Russian Intellectual History
The Birth of Civilization
Studies in Det. Hist & Culture
The Arts & Culture of Detroit
20th-C Russian Intel History
Early Russian History
Imperial Russia
The Russian Revolutions
England: Tudors and Stuarts
Modern Britain
African American History
Early American Republic
Civil War & Reconstruction
Late Imperial China
Traditional China
History of Modern China
Traditional Japan
Modern Japan
Medieval Society
The Renaissance
The Reformation Era: 1500-1648
Europe in Age of Rev:1750-1815
Europe in Age of Imp:1815-1914
20th-Century Europe, 1890-1945
The Contmp World, 1945-Present
Islamic Movemnts Mid East Hist
Women&Islam Mid East to 1900
Ottoman Empire in 19th Century
Freud's Vienna: 1866-1920
Hist, Lit, & 20th Century Iran
Germany Before Hitler
West Africa Since 1800
Thomas Edison and his Era
The United States and Vietnam
Eng Colonies in Amer,1607-1763
American Revolution, 1763-1815
Emerg of Modern U.S.,1876-1916
Era of World Wars:1916-1946
The U.S. Since 1946
United States Economic History
Eur and Intern'l Econ History
Rel in Amer Hist:1607-1865
Rel in Am Hist II:1865-Present
Black Exp in U.S.:1865-Present
Civil Rights Movement in Amer
Women in Am-Hist Perspective
American Ideas, 1607-1865
History of Industrial Technlgy
Heterodox Economics
History of Consciousness
Language, Myth & Dreams
Intell Hist of Modern Europe
Labor in America
Immigration in America
Modern France
Compar History of Technology
Aspects of the Holocaust
Nazi Germany
Armenia Ancient Medieval World
Armenia in the Soviet Period
Armenians in the Modern World
Modern Middle East, 1918-1945
Modern Middle East, 1945-1991
Lebanon in Modern Middle East
Michigan History
Comparat. American Identities
The US in the Middle East
History of Islam in the US
The 1960s in America
Women Leadership/Social Change
Automobile in American Life
Henry Ford and His Place
Intro to Arab American Studies
Arab Americans Since 1890
American City
Bible in History
Media Law and Ethics
Narrative Journalism
Online Reprting,Rsrch,Writing
Narratives of Film and Lit
Postwar European Cinema
Black Cinema
Gender,Sex,Powr Screen Studies
Investigative Reporting
Issues in Cyberspace
New and Emerging Media
American Cinema
Ethnographic Film
Psychology of Language
American English
Modern English Grammar
Contemporary Rhetorical Theory
Discourse Analysis
Second Lang Acquisition: Engl
Sociolinguistics
African American English
Concepts in Linguistics
History of the English Lang
World Englishes
Probability
Dynamical Systems
History of Mathematics
Political Islam
Italian Culture Civilization
Introduction to the Qur'an
Postwar European Cinema
Images of Women in Germany
This American Life
Contemporary Physics
Environmental Physics
Current Topics in Physics
Biological Physics
Quantum Mechanics
Political Analysis
The Theory of the Law
Justice
American Political Thought
Race/Justice/Freedom in Amer
Political Ideologies
Marxist Thought
Moral and Political Dilemmas
Ancient Political Theory
Modern Political Theory
Issues in Amer Pol Thought
Criminal Law
Politics and Human Nature
Environmental Politics
Religion and Politics
American Constitutional Law
Civil Rights and Liberties
Problems in Constitutional Law
Supreme Court and Religion
Revolution
Peace and War
Criminal Law
Life-Span Developmental Psych
Psych of Infant Development
Psych of Child Development
Intro to Women's & Gender Stud
Personality Development
Social Psychology
Attitude and Social Behavior
Psychology of Prejudice
Psyc of Interpersonal Relation
Cognitive Psychology
Animal Behavior
Psychology of Language
Psychology and Theater
Parent-Child Relations
Gender Roles
Psychology of Adolescence
Psychology of Aging
Cognitive Development
Group Processes
Socialization of the Child
Abnormal Psychology
Child Psychopathology
Human Sexual Behavior
Personality Theory
Prin of Counseling and Psych
Health Psychology
Learning and Memory
Sensation and Perception
Experimental Psychology
Advanced Physiological Psych
Reproductive Phys and Beh
Animal Learning and Cognition
History of Psychology
Seminar in Psychology
Diversity and the Workplace
Motivation and Behavior
Intro to Women's & Gender Stud
Studies in Det.Hist. & Culture
Comparat. American Identities
Sociological Theory
Computers and Society
Poverty and Inequality
Social Psychology
Minority Groups
Feminist Theories
Men and Masculinities
American Social Classes
Society and Aging
Population Problems
Urban Sociology
Medical Sociology
Sociology of Work
Gender Roles
The Family
Marriage and Family Problems
Family Violence
Comparative Health Care Sys
Black Family in Contemp Amer
Political Sociology
Marxism
Sociology of Law
Sociology of Religion
Sociology of Education
America in a Global Society
Cops & Cons: Women in Prison
Deviant Behavior/Soc Disorganz
Drugs, Alcohol, and Society
Race, Crime and Justice
Inside Out Prison Exchange
Gender and Globalization
Violence Against Women
Dissed: Differ, Power, Discrim
Sexual Praxis and Theory
Masterpiece of Latin Amer Lit
Masterpieces of Spanish Lit
Latino Literature
Spanish Civilization and Cult
Latin American Civiliztn Cult
Spain in the Twentieth Century
Hispanic Cinema
Spanish Film
Contemporary Spanish Lit
Public Argument and Advocacy
Argumentation and Debate
Persuasion & Social Movements
20th Century Public Argument
Applied Statistics I

Minor or Integrative Studies Concentration

A minor or concentration consists of 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in philosophy (PHIL).

PHIL 100     Introduction to Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

An introduction to philosophical thinking through an examination of some timeless human problems such as the existence of God, the problem of freedom, and the attempt to find an ethical foundation for life. (F,W).

PHIL 120     Philosophy and Religion     3 Credit Hours

An examination of how basic concerns of philosophy impinge on questions of religious beliefs. Using philosophical texts, the course will explore such questions as the following: Does God exist? Does human life have a purpose? How can we know whether religious claims are true?

PHIL 200     The Human Condition     3 Credit Hours

The human condition as seen in selected works of philosophy and literature. Typical issues: the meaning of life, the existence of God, moral responsibility for human actions, and the role of society in promoting or hindering human excellence. (OC).

PHIL 233     Critical Thinking     3 Credit Hours

A study of the nature and justification of reasoned arguments, both deductive and inductive, as they occur in natural language. A consideration of topics in language that promote an understanding of ways of reasoning, including definitions and fallacies. (F,W).

PHIL 234     Symbolic Logic     3 Credit Hours

This course will examine the central themes in modern symbolic logic including consistency, truth-functionality, sentential first-order predicate logic, and the logic of identity and possibility. These themes and their relation to the wider philosophical context will be discussed. (F,W).

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 233

PHIL 240     Ethics     3 Credit Hours

A study of ethical concepts and theories. Typical questions: Is the morality of an action based on its results or on the intent of the person acting? Is ethics purely rational? What makes a good person? Ethical principles may be applied to such issues as abortion, capitalism, war, and capital punishment. (F,W).

PHIL 301     Ancient Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

An examination of the metaphysical, epistemological, ethical, and political theories of the ancient Greek philosophers with particular attention paid to Plato and Aristotle and to the influence of their ideas on Western culture. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 302     Modern Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

A study of 17th and 18th century European philosophers including such philosophers as Descartes, Spinoza, Hume, and Kant with emphasis on their metaphysical and epistemological theories and how those theories provided a foundation for science and a bedrock for modern thought. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 303     Kant and the 19th Century     3 Credit Hours

The development of philosophical thought from Kant through the 19th century. In addition to Kant, figures discussed may include Hegel, Schopenhauer, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche. Readings in selected texts. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 304     Twentieth-Century Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

A study of selected topics, movements, and figures in the philosophy of the twentieth century, including such representative subjects as continental philosophy, contemporary philosophy of mind, and analytic philosophy. Designed to meet the needs of students in literature and the history of ideas as well as philosophy students. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of the instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 305     Marxism     3 Credit Hours

This course is an introduction to the philosophy of Marxism which emphasizes Marx's theories of human nature, alienation, class struggle, and revolution through readings of classical and contemporary texts. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 335 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 306     Islamic Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

The course covers the development of Islam, basic Islamic doctrine, and a selection of issues that have been debated within the Islamic philosophical tradition. Students read original texts by Muslim philosophers and think critically about the issues in them and the arguments raised about them. All readings in English; no knowledge of Arabic required.

PHIL 307     Medieval Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

This course is an introduction to Medieval Philosophy and is structured around the ideas and works of key philosophers in the Christian, Islamic and Jewish religious traditions. It attempts to answer the question of what `Medieval Philosophy? is and how it fits into the larger context of the Western philosophical tradition. The course is roughly divided into four sections based on the chronological development of philosophy through the Middle Ages ? (I) Early Medieval Christian Philosophy, (II) Islamic Philosophy, (III) Jewish Philosophy and (IV) Latin Christian Philosophy in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries. We will look at what some famous Christian, Muslim and Jewish philosophers, such as Augustine, Boethius, Anselm, Peter Abelard, Al-Ghazali, Ibn Rushd, Saadia, Maimonides, Aquinas, Scotus and Ockham had to say about a diverse range of philosophical issues and topics, including the existence and nature of God, free will, morality, reason and revelation, human nature and the problem of universals. (YR)

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or HUM 200 or PHIL 200 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 350

PHIL 310     Darwinism and Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 312     Environmental Ethics     3 Credit Hours

The relationship of human beings to the non-human environment raises pressing moral and political issues. This course will use the theories and concepts of philosophical ethics to explore such questions as human obligations to non-human animals; the preservation of wilderness; balancing economic, aesthetic, and spiritual values; and the problems of pollution, urban sprawl, and ecological justice. Prerequisite or permission of instructor. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 240* or CRJ 240 or ENST 105 or ENST 301

PHIL 315     Ethics of War & Peace     3 Credit Hours

A philosophical exploration of ethical issues underlying war and peace. The course will treat such questions as the following: what wars, if any, are just? Are there moral restrictions on the methods that may be used? What individuals are morally responsible for wartime decisions, and to what degree? Discussion of these issues will be used to elucidate larger problems in ethical theory. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 320     The Problem of Human Freedom     3 Credit Hours

A critical examination of the idea of freedom: the free will/determinism debate, moral and legal responsibility, punishment, and the relationship between metaphysical and social freedom. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 327     Kierkegaard & Nietzsche     3 Credit Hours

This course will explore the philosophical views of Kierkegaard and Nietzsche, examining the interconnections and differences between these two thinkers as well as each one's contributions to philosophy and psychology. The course will focus on both philosophers' emphasis on the individual and how that emphasis arose as a response to the social, political and economic changes in the 19th century and anticipated and influenced philosophical developments in the 20th century, in particular existentialism.

PHIL 335     Philosophy of Law     3 Credit Hours

An examination of some of the important philosophical issues relevant to law and legal theory, including legal punishment, legal responsibility, and the relationship between law and morality. Both classical and contemporary writings will be studied. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 340     Analytic Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

An introduction to philosophy as the analysis and evaluation of fundamental concepts and principles occurring in ordinary life and in the sciences. While analytic philosophy in the twentieth century is emphasized, its antecedents in the history of western philosophy will be examined. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 350     Symbolic Logic     3 Credit Hours

This course will examine the central themes in modern symbolic logic including consistency, truth-functionality, sentential first-order predicate logic, and the logic of identity and possibility. These themes and their relation to the wider philosophical context will be discussed. (F,W).

PHIL 360     Philosophy of Technology     3 Credit Hours

A study of both the history of, and current issues in, the philosophy of technology. This course will examine the deeper meaning and implications of our modern technological society. Questions examined include: What is the definition and nature of technology? How did the concept originate in Western thought? What is the relationship between modern industrial technology and the 'mechanistic' worldview? How do Western religious beliefs influence our attitudes about technology? Is technological progress socially determined, or is it culturally independent? In what ways has our technological society been supportive of, or detrimental to, overall human well-being? Students will cover both classic and contemporary readings.

PHIL 365     Philosophy of Religion     3 Credit Hours

A philosophical examination of basic religious problems, such as the nature and grounds of religious belief, the existence and nature of God, human immortality, the relations of religion and science, and the nature of religious language. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): RELS 120 PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 369     Philosophy of Art     3 Credit Hours

An examination and critique of both traditional and contemporary theories of art as well as an examination of theories of the aesthetic including theories of beauty, taste, and the aesthetic attitude. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490 or PHIL 371

PHIL 370     Philosophy of Mind     3 Credit Hours

A study of current philosophical work in the area of consciousness studies examining the nature and function of human consciousness and the problem of reconciling an objective, scientific view of consciousness with our subjective experience of it. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 371     Philosophy in Literature     3 Credit Hours

An exploration of philosophical problems as they are encountered in works of literature. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 375     Problems of Human Knowledge     3 Credit Hours

A study of issues and problems that arise in considering the nature of knowledge: an examination of traditional theories of knowledge and recent critiques of those theories. Readings of classical and contemporary texts. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 590

PHIL 380     Theories of Reality     3 Credit Hours

A critical examination of philosophical positions that claim to distinguish between what is real and what is apparent; an evaluation of the basic principles of philosophy and of extra-philosophical disciplines. Readings of classical and contemporary texts. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 384     Feminist Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

Feminists working in philosophy, most notably in the 19th and 20th centuries, have altered the traditional philosophical canon by first, recovering women philosophers who were essentially erased from the history and secondly, by extending and contributing to the standard questions of philosophy. For example, one central question of philosophy; "What can we know with certainty?" has been transformed through a feminist lens and reinterpreted as "What does one's gender, social location, and cultural framework contribute to what one knows?" In this course we will look at the variety of feminist philosophical theories with a focus on epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or WST 275 or WGST 275 or WGST 303 or HUM 275 or ANTH 275 or PSYC 275 or SOC 275 or HUM 303 or ANTH 303 or PSYC 303 or SOC 303

PHIL 390     Topics in Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

Examination of problems and issues in selected areas of philosophy. Title as listed in Schedule of Classes will change according to content. Course may be repeated for credit when specific topics differ. Typical topics: Philosophy of Language, Minds and Machines, Moral Responsibility. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 390Q     Topics in Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

In this course students will explore the ways that cognitive and affective aspects of social identities (race, gender, socio-economic class, sexual orientation, dis/ability) intersect with issues of social power and privilege to make critical thinking and critical dialogue particularly challenging. We will consider how the history of `argument? in Western philosophy has contributed to the challenges of social identity debates and we will explore a variety cognitive biases and logical fallacies as well as strategies for effectively countering these biases and fallacies.

PHIL 390R     Topics in Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

Topic Title: Eastern Philosophy: Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism- The purpose of this course is to examine the roots and development of the three main strands of thought in Eastern Philosophy: Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism. We will do this by first working through the foundational ideas and arguments as they are found in the work Kogzi (Confucius) and Laozi, analyzing the basic arguments and disagreements, which pave the way for subsequent thinkers. We will then look at the development of these ideas in the followers of these two schools of thought. We end by examining the original development of Buddhism in India, and its subsequent transformation to Zen or Chan Buddhism as it encounters Daoism in China. Given the significant emphasis on praxis (as opposed to theory) in both Daoism and Zen tradition, it will often be the case that the distinction between philosophy and religion becomes blurred. Eastern Philosophy has a long and rich tradition, often beginning with radically different starting points and concerns from its Western counterpart (although there are certain overlaps and similarities). As such, this course will offer a window into a set of philosophical discourses that have only recently been seriously examined in the West.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 200 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240

PHIL 390S     Topics in Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

Topic Title: Philosophy of Race- The concept of ?race? remains controversial. The controversy concerns two broad issues: first, whether ?race? is a legitimate way to demarcate human groups, as opposed to, say ethnicity, or simply seeing all persons as individuals; and, second, whether the continued use of the category of race exacerbates racism. Contemporary philosophers have been making important contributions to these issues, addressing such questions as: what is the true meaning of the concept of ?race?? Is the concept of race a mere myth or fiction? Does the use of racial categories exacerbate racism? What race is a mixed race person? What is the race of Latinos or Arabs? How can racism best be reduced and resisted? This course will explore recent philosophical work on the concept of race and the political effects of racial identities. Students will gain an understanding of how philosophers analyze and use concepts, especially as they apply to the politics of race in the U.S. Students will also gain a better understanding of the underlining causes of the rash of police lynching that has galvanized the Black Lives Matter Movement.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 200 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240

PHIL 399     Independent Studies     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Readings or analytical assignments in philosophy in accordance with the needs and interests of those enrolled and agreed upon by the student and instructor. (F,W).

PHIL 415     Existentialism and Its Sources     3 Credit Hours

An exploration of the literary sources of existentialism and a critical study of selected philosophical texts. Particular themes - death, subjectivity, alienation, commitment, and freedom - will be considered in an attempt to formulate an existential conception of the human condition. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 335 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 441     Social and Political Phil     3 Credit Hours

An analysis of some fundamental problems of political and social philosophy, with special attention to the way in which theory may function as a guide to specific policies. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 335 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 411 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 442     Medical Ethics     3 Credit Hours

An examination of moral issues in medicine. Among the problems to be considered are truth-telling and paternalism in the doctor-patient relationship, psychosurgery and behavior control, death and euthanasia, the allocation of scarce resources, and genetic counseling and control. Specific attention will be given to ethical theories and to philosophical concepts such as rights, autonomy, and justice. Students cannot receive credit for both PHIL 442 and PHIL 542. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 335 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 490

PHIL 445     Contemporary Ethical Issues     3 Credit Hours

An intensive study of a topic in recent ethical theory. Topics will vary with each offering. Among the topics: ethics and law, utilitarianism, virtue theory, theories of justice, morality and emotion, ethics and partiality. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 335 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 490

PHIL 485     Philosophy of Science     3 Credit Hours

A critical study of the foundations of the sciences, natural and social, with emphasis on the following topics: the nature of scientific method, theories and explanation, probability and determinism, the unity of the sciences. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 490

PHIL 490     Studies in Philosophy     1 to 4 Credit Hours

Intensive study of a figure, movement, or issue in philosophy. Title as listed in Schedule of Classes will change according to content. Course may be repeated for credit when specific topics differ. Typical topics: Plato's dialogues, philosophical foundations of mathematics, minds and machines. (OC).

PHIL 496     Independent Studies     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Topics in philosophy not ordinarily included in other courses in philosophy. Selected in accordance with needs and interests of those enrolled.

PHIL 497     Independent Studies     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Topics in philosophy not ordinarily included in other courses in philosophy, selected in accordance with the needs and interests of those enrolled.

PHIL 498     Independent Studies     1 to 4 Credit Hours

Topics in philosophy not ordinarily included in other courses in philosophy, selected in accordance with the needs and interests of those enrolled. Credit hours will vary. (F,W).

PHIL 499     Independent Studies     1 to 4 Credit Hours

Topics in philosophy not ordinarily included in other courses in philosophy, selected in accordance with the needs and interests of those enrolled. Credit hours will vary. (F,W).

 

Frequency of Offering

The following abbreviations are used to denote the frequency of offering: (F) fall term; (W) winter term; (S) summer term; (F, W) fall and winter terms; (YR) once a year; (AY) alternating years; (OC) offered occasionally