Philosophy

Philosophy explores the fundamental values and assumptions of human activities such as science, the arts, religion, morality, and social and political institutions. It uses the power of human reasoning to address such questions as "What is it to know something?" "What is the best way to live? and "Is belief in God rationally justifiable?" Ultimately, philosophy has as its goal the development of a coherent view of the world and our place in it.

Philosophical inquiry helps students acquire and sharpen valuable intellectual and practical skills that can be important in their careers. These skills include effective writing, verbal argumentation, and critical thinking.

The primary value of philosophy lies in its contribution to intellectual insight and to a liberal arts education. The study of philosophy can also serve as a basis for a variety of careers, including medicine, business, and government. It is especially effective as the basis for a pre-law program. Recent developments in cognitive science and in medical and environmental ethics have broadened the range of careers and professions for which the study of philosophy can be recommended.

Prerequisites to the Major

PHIL 100Introduction to Philosophy3
PHIL 233Critical Thinking3
or PHIL 234 Symbolic Logic
PHIL 240Ethics3
Total Credit Hours9

Dearborn Discovery Core Requirement

The minimum passing grade for a Dearborn Discovery Core (DDC) course is 2.0. The minimum GPA for the program is 2.0. In addition, the DDC permits any approved course to satisfy up to three credit hours within three different categories. Please see the General Education Program: The Dearborn Discovery Core section for additional information.

Foundational Studies

Written and Oral Communication (GEWO) – 6 Credits

Upper Level Writing Intensive (GEWI) – 3 Credits

Quantitative Thinking and Problem Solving (GEQT) – 3 Credits

Critical and Creative Thinking (GECC) – 3 Credits

Areas of Inquiry

Natural Science (GENS) – 7 Credits

  • Lecture/Lab Science Course
  • Additional Science Course

Social and Behavioral Analysis (GESB) – 9 Credits

Humanities and the Arts (GEHA) – 6 Credits

Intersections (GEIN) – 6 Credits

Capstone

Capstone (GECE) – 3 Credits

Foreign Language Requirement

Complete a two-semester beginning language sequence.

Ancient Greek I and II MCL 105 and MCL 106
Arabic I and II ARBC 101 and ARBC 102
Armenian I and II MCL 111 and MCL 112
French I and II FREN 101 and FREN 102
German I and II GER 101 and GER 102
Latin I and II LAT 101 and LAT 102
Spanish I and II SPAN 101 and SPAN 102

Major Requirements

PHIL 301
PHIL 302
Ancient Philosophy
and Modern Philosophy
6
Alternative I or II
A student may choose either a traditional major in philosophy (Alternative I) or a program that stresses the relationship of philosophy to other areas of study (Alternative II).12-18
Cognates (CALC)
As noted above, cognate requirements depend on the student's choosing between Alternative I and Alternative II. Approved list of cognate courses can be obtained on Degree Works.6-12

With regard to both Alternatives, students are strongly encouraged to work closely with a philosophy faculty adviser to develop a coherent program. Alternative I requires a total of 24 credit hours in philosophy (PHIL) courses at the upper level (300 or 400 level) and six upper-level hours from an approved list of cognate courses in one or more disciplines outside philosophy. Alternative II requires a total of 18 credit hours in philosophy courses at the 300 or 400 level and 12 credit hours upper-level of cognate courses from the approved list. Satisfactory completion of PHIL 301 Ancient Philosophy and PHIL 302 Modern Philosophy will be counted as part of the 24 hours in philosophy in Alternative I or as part of the 18 hours in philosophy in Alternative II.

Notes:

  1. A maximum of 44 credit hours in PHIL may count in the 120 hours required to graduate.
  2. Credit cannot be given for both PHIL 234 and PHIL 350.
  3. At least 15 credit hours of upper level Philosophy (PHIL) required for the major must be elected at UM-Dearborn.

Minor or LIBS Concentration

A minor or concentration consists of 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in philosophy (PHIL).

PHIL 100     Introduction to Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

An introduction to philosophical thinking through an examination of some timeless human problems such as the existence of God, the problem of freedom, and the attempt to find an ethical foundation for life. (F,W).

PHIL 120     Philosophy and Religion     3 Credit Hours

An examination of how basic concerns of philosophy impinge on questions of religious beliefs. Using philosophical texts, the course will explore such questions as the following: Does God exist? Does human life have a purpose? How can we know whether religious claims are true?

PHIL 200     The Human Condition     3 Credit Hours

The human condition as seen in selected works of philosophy and literature. Typical issues: the meaning of life, the existence of God, moral responsibility for human actions, and the role of society in promoting or hindering human excellence. (OC).

PHIL 233     Critical Thinking     3 Credit Hours

A study of the nature and justification of reasoned arguments, both deductive and inductive, as they occur in natural language. A consideration of topics in language that promote an understanding of ways of reasoning, including definitions and fallacies. (F,W).

PHIL 234     Symbolic Logic     3 Credit Hours

This course will examine the central themes in modern symbolic logic including consistency, truth-functionality, sentential first-order predicate logic, and the logic of identity and possibility. These themes and their relation to the wider philosophical context will be discussed. (F,W).

PHIL 240     Ethics     3 Credit Hours

A study of ethical concepts and theories. Typical questions: Is the morality of an action based on its results or on the intent of the person acting? Is ethics purely rational? What makes a good person? Ethical principles may be applied to such issues as abortion, capitalism, war, and capital punishment. (F,W).

PHIL 301     Ancient Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

An examination of the metaphysical, epistemological, ethical, and political theories of the ancient Greek philosophers with particular attention paid to Plato and Aristotle and to the influence of their ideas on Western culture. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 302     Modern Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

A study of 17th and 18th century European philosophers including such philosophers as Descartes, Spinoza, Hume, and Kant with emphasis on their metaphysical and epistemological theories and how those theories provided a foundation for science and a bedrock for modern thought. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 303     Kant and the 19th Century     3 Credit Hours

The development of philosophical thought from Kant through the 19th century. In addition to Kant, figures discussed may include Hegel, Schopenhauer, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche. Readings in selected texts. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 304     Twentieth-Century Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

A study of selected topics, movements, and figures in the philosophy of the twentieth century, including such representative subjects as continental philosophy, contemporary philosophy of mind, and analytic philosophy. Designed to meet the needs of students in literature and the history of ideas as well as philosophy students. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of the instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 305     Marxism     3 Credit Hours

This course is an introduction to the philosophy of Marxism which emphasizes Marx's theories of human nature, alienation, class struggle, and revolution through readings of classical and contemporary texts. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 335 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 306     Islamic Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

The course covers the development of Islam, basic Islamic doctrine, and a selection of issues that have been debated within the Islamic philosophical tradition. Students read original texts by Muslim philosophers and think critically about the issues in them and the arguments raised about them. All readings in English; no knowledge of Arabic required.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100

PHIL 307     Medieval Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

This course is an introduction to Medieval Philosophy and is structured around the ideas and works of key philosophers in the Christian, Islamic and Jewish religious traditions. It attempts to answer the question of what `Medieval Philosophy? is and how it fits into the larger context of the Western philosophical tradition. The course is roughly divided into four sections based on the chronological development of philosophy through the Middle Ages ? (I) Early Medieval Christian Philosophy, (II) Islamic Philosophy, (III) Jewish Philosophy and (IV) Latin Christian Philosophy in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries. We will look at what some famous Christian, Muslim and Jewish philosophers, such as Augustine, Boethius, Anselm, Peter Abelard, Al-Ghazali, Ibn Rushd, Saadia, Maimonides, Aquinas, Scotus and Ockham had to say about a diverse range of philosophical issues and topics, including the existence and nature of God, free will, morality, reason and revelation, human nature and the problem of universals. (YR)

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or HUM 200 or PHIL 200 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 350

PHIL 310     Darwinism and Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 312     Environmental Ethics     3 Credit Hours

The relationship of human beings to the non-human environment raises pressing moral and political issues. This course will use the theories and concepts of philosophical ethics to explore such questions as human obligations to non-human animals; the preservation of wilderness; balancing economic, aesthetic, and spiritual values; and the problems of pollution, urban sprawl, and ecological justice. Prerequisite or permission of instructor. (YR).

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 240* or CRJ 240 or ENST 105 or ENST 301

PHIL 315     Ethics of War & Peace     3 Credit Hours

A philosophical exploration of ethical issues underlying war and peace. The course will treat such questions as the following: what wars, if any, are just? Are there moral restrictions on the methods that may be used? What individuals are morally responsible for wartime decisions, and to what degree? Discussion of these issues will be used to elucidate larger problems in ethical theory. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 320     The Problem of Human Freedom     3 Credit Hours

A critical examination of the idea of freedom: the free will/determinism debate, moral and legal responsibility, punishment, and the relationship between metaphysical and social freedom. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 327     Kierkegaard & Nietzsche     3 Credit Hours

This course will explore the philosophical views of Kierkegaard and Nietzsche, examining the interconnections and differences between these two thinkers as well as each one's contributions to philosophy and psychology. The course will focus on both philosophers' emphasis on the individual and how that emphasis arose as a response to the social, political and economic changes in the 19th century and anticipated and influenced philosophical developments in the 20th century, in particular existentialism.

PHIL 335     Philosophy of Law     3 Credit Hours

An examination of some of the important philosophical issues relevant to law and legal theory, including legal punishment, legal responsibility, and the relationship between law and morality. Both classical and contemporary writings will be studied. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 340     Analytic Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

An introduction to philosophy as the analysis and evaluation of fundamental concepts and principles occurring in ordinary life and in the sciences. While analytic philosophy in the twentieth century is emphasized, its antecedents in the history of western philosophy will be examined. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 350     Symbolic Logic     3 Credit Hours

This course will examine the central themes in modern symbolic logic including consistency, truth-functionality, sentential first-order predicate logic, and the logic of identity and possibility. These themes and their relation to the wider philosophical context will be discussed. (F,W).

PHIL 360     Philosophy of Technology     3 Credit Hours

A study of both the history of, and current issues in, the philosophy of technology. This course will examine the deeper meaning and implications of our modern technological society. Questions examined include: What is the definition and nature of technology? How did the concept originate in Western thought? What is the relationship between modern industrial technology and the 'mechanistic' worldview? How do Western religious beliefs influence our attitudes about technology? Is technological progress socially determined, or is it culturally independent? In what ways has our technological society been supportive of, or detrimental to, overall human well-being? Students will cover both classic and contemporary readings.

PHIL 365     Philosophy of Religion     3 Credit Hours

A philosophical examination of basic religious problems, such as the nature and grounds of religious belief, the existence and nature of God, human immortality, the relations of religion and science, and the nature of religious language. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): RELS 120 PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 369     Philosophy of Art     3 Credit Hours

An examination and critique of both traditional and contemporary theories of art as well as an examination of theories of the aesthetic including theories of beauty, taste, and the aesthetic attitude. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490 or PHIL 371

PHIL 370     Philosophy of Mind     3 Credit Hours

A study of current philosophical work in the area of consciousness studies examining the nature and function of human consciousness and the problem of reconciling an objective, scientific view of consciousness with our subjective experience of it. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 371     Philosophy in Literature     3 Credit Hours

An exploration of philosophical problems as they are encountered in works of literature. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 375     Problems of Human Knowledge     3 Credit Hours

A study of issues and problems that arise in considering the nature of knowledge: an examination of traditional theories of knowledge and recent critiques of those theories. Readings of classical and contemporary texts. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 590

PHIL 380     Theories of Reality     3 Credit Hours

A critical examination of philosophical positions that claim to distinguish between what is real and what is apparent; an evaluation of the basic principles of philosophy and of extra-philosophical disciplines. Readings of classical and contemporary texts. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 384     Feminist Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

Feminists working in philosophy, most notably in the 19th and 20th centuries, have altered the traditional philosophical canon by first, recovering women philosophers who were essentially erased from the history and secondly, by extending and contributing to the standard questions of philosophy. For example, one central question of philosophy; "What can we know with certainty?" has been transformed through a feminist lens and reinterpreted as "What does one's gender, social location, and cultural framework contribute to what one knows?" In this course we will look at the variety of feminist philosophical theories with a focus on epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or WST 275 or WGST 275 or WGST 303 or HUM 275 or ANTH 275 or PSYC 275 or SOC 275 or HUM 303 or ANTH 303 or PSYC 303 or SOC 303

PHIL 390     Topics in Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

Examination of problems and issues in selected areas of philosophy. Title as listed in Schedule of Classes will change according to content. Course may be repeated for credit when specific topics differ. Typical topics: Philosophy of Language, Minds and Machines, Moral Responsibility. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 390Q     Topics in Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

In this course students will explore the ways that cognitive and affective aspects of social identities (race, gender, socio-economic class, sexual orientation, dis/ability) intersect with issues of social power and privilege to make critical thinking and critical dialogue particularly challenging. We will consider how the history of `argument? in Western philosophy has contributed to the challenges of social identity debates and we will explore a variety cognitive biases and logical fallacies as well as strategies for effectively countering these biases and fallacies.

PHIL 399     Independent Studies     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Readings or analytical assignments in philosophy in accordance with the needs and interests of those enrolled and agreed upon by the student and instructor. (F,W).

PHIL 415     Existentialism and Its Sources     3 Credit Hours

An exploration of the literary sources of existentialism and a critical study of selected philosophical texts. Particular themes - death, subjectivity, alienation, commitment, and freedom - will be considered in an attempt to formulate an existential conception of the human condition. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 335 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 441     Social and Political Phil     3 Credit Hours

An analysis of some fundamental problems of political and social philosophy, with special attention to the way in which theory may function as a guide to specific policies. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 335 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 411 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

PHIL 442     Medical Ethics     3 Credit Hours

An examination of moral issues in medicine. Among the problems to be considered are truth-telling and paternalism in the doctor-patient relationship, psychosurgery and behavior control, death and euthanasia, the allocation of scarce resources, and genetic counseling and control. Specific attention will be given to ethical theories and to philosophical concepts such as rights, autonomy, and justice. Students cannot receive credit for both PHIL 442 and PHIL 542. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 335 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 490

PHIL 445     Contemporary Ethical Issues     3 Credit Hours

An intensive study of a topic in recent ethical theory. Topics will vary with each offering. Among the topics: ethics and law, utilitarianism, virtue theory, theories of justice, morality and emotion, ethics and partiality. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 335 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 490

PHIL 485     Philosophy of Science     3 Credit Hours

A critical study of the foundations of the sciences, natural and social, with emphasis on the following topics: the nature of scientific method, theories and explanation, probability and determinism, the unity of the sciences. Students electing this course must have successfully completed a previous course in philosophy or have permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 442 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 490

PHIL 490     Studies in Philosophy     1 to 4 Credit Hours

Intensive study of a figure, movement, or issue in philosophy. Title as listed in Schedule of Classes will change according to content. Course may be repeated for credit when specific topics differ. Typical topics: Plato's dialogues, philosophical foundations of mathematics, minds and machines. (OC).

PHIL 496     Independent Studies     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Topics in philosophy not ordinarily included in other courses in philosophy. Selected in accordance with needs and interests of those enrolled.

PHIL 497     Independent Studies     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Topics in philosophy not ordinarily included in other courses in philosophy, selected in accordance with the needs and interests of those enrolled.

PHIL 498     Independent Studies     1 to 4 Credit Hours

Topics in philosophy not ordinarily included in other courses in philosophy, selected in accordance with the needs and interests of those enrolled. Credit hours will vary. (F,W).

PHIL 499     Independent Studies     1 to 4 Credit Hours

Topics in philosophy not ordinarily included in other courses in philosophy, selected in accordance with the needs and interests of those enrolled. Credit hours will vary. (F,W).

 
*

An asterisk denotes that a course may be taken concurrently.

Frequency of Offering

The following abbreviations are used to denote the frequency of offering: (F) fall term; (W) winter term; (S) summer term; (F, W) fall and winter terms; (YR) once a year; (AY) alternating years; (OC) offered occasionally