Liberal Studies (LIBS)

LIBS 101     Foundatns of Academic Success     1 Credit Hour

This course is intended to introduce students to the nature and purpose of higher education, and of academic inquiry. Academic planning, information literacy, bibliographic search techniques and the evaluation of electronic information are discussed.

LIBS 111     To Infinity and Beyond     3 Credit Hours

In this seminar we explore the emergence and evolution of concepts surrounding zero, infinity, and dimension. These mathematical topics are introduced in a historical context as the by-products of human enterprise. Students study foundations of number systems, investigate objects with fractional dimensions, gain an understanding of logic as it applied to proof methodology, and develop visualization skills, creating a tangible experience with abstract mathematical objects and concepts. The supporting material is drawn from selected readings, as well as films and videos. (F).

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman

LIBS 112     Car Culture     3 Credit Hours

A study of the impact of the automobile on contemporary American culture and society using the concepts and approaches of the multidisciplinary field of Science and Technology Studies. The course examines the social contexts and consequences of how cars are designed, assembled, marketed, driven, and regulated; their role in shaping individual, group, and national identity; and their place in the American imagination. (F).

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman

LIBS 113     The World in a Grain of Sand     3 Credit Hours

From a single artifact (an object or a text), students will learn to build an understanding of an entire culture in a given historical moment. First by analyzing the artifact and then by building a larger context in which to interpret the significance of that artifact, students will also build their own academic community. By the end of the course, each student will have mastered the use of all library research resources and have developed a specific expertise in an area of research related to the artifact. By the end of the course, the class will have organized its own academic conference on the artifact in which they will share their research and insights. The professor will be a specialist in the area from which the artifact is selected and will guide you in your mastery of research skills and acculturation to academic life. (F).

Corequisite(s): COMP 105, COMP 106

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman

LIBS 114     The Roots of American Activism     3 Credit Hours

This course examines the history, rhetoric, and social context of American citizen activism in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Topics will include African American abolitionist and civil rights activism, women's suffrage, the home economics movement, the labor movement, educational reform, and student political involvement on college campuses. We will also pay special attention to how these movements played out locally. Our goal throughout will be to understand how ordinary citizens used language to effect social change - and how we today might do the same. (F)

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

LIBS 115     Shakespeare: Stage/Page/Screen     3 Credit Hours

What has made the plays of Shakespeare so relevant to a well-rounded education in universities around the world? How do Shakespeare's plays transcend his period making him, in Ben Jonson's words, "not of age, but for all time"? In this course we shall discuss the literary, stage and film traditions of Shakespeare's plays as well as the wholesale borrowings from, echoes and parodies of them in popular culture, from Dr. Who to graphic novels, and the commercialization of Shakespeare in such unlikely mediums as Levis jean commercials. This course challenges students to consider how the medium of the artistic work (e.g. film, play, illustration) affects interpretation and how the artisitc work is conditioned by the social contexts of its time. From comic books to live performance, Slings and Arrows to Kenneth Branagh, this course explores the textual, performance and visual history of a selection of Shakespeare's plays and the cultural signifigance of Shakespeare today. Note: the course will include an excursion to see a play at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival in Ontario, Canada.

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman

LIBS 116     Fast Food Nation     3 Credit Hours

This course explores the role of fast food in our society. Fast food is something we take for granted, yet it has helped shape our culture as well as our economy and is a key symbol of the American lifestyle to the rest of the world. In this course we will examine the history of the fast food industry, the nature of work in the fast food sector, the global reach of corporations like McDonald's and Starbucks, the environmental impact of food production, and the rise of the "slow food" movement. The course will introduce students to perspectives from the social and behavioral sciences including economics, sociology, anthropology, environmental studies, science and technology studies, politics, and history. (F)

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman

LIBS 117     The Conscious Brain     3 Credit Hours

This course will use visual perception and its organization in the brain and related phenomena such as attention and memory as tools to explore the issue of where in the brain consciousness is located, and what the necessary and sufficient criteria for consciousness are. A central premise is that consciousness, formerly the sole province of philosophers, can now be studied empirically using scientific methodologies. (F)

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman

LIBS 118     Gender & Relationships     3 Credit Hours

This course will focus on gender and close relationships. We will examine how pop culture (including popular movies and self-help psychology books) tend to construct gender as a naturally occurring dichotomy, emphasizing the "vast" differences between women and men. For example, John Gray's relationship self-help book titled "Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus" has sold millions of copies and has helped to perpetuate the idea that women and men are so different as to be considered different species. The course will introduce students to perspectives from various disciplines including psychology, sociology, communications and gender studies. Using theory and scientific research from these various disciplines, students will learn to critically examine the ways that gender and close relationships are portrayed in our society.

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman

LIBS 119     Culture Wars     3 Credit Hours

This course explores the aspects of the conflict between religion and science in America using the Scopes Trial of 1925 as the primary case study. The trial centered on the teaching of certain ideas generally thought to be part of Charles Darwin's theory of evolution via natural selection. These claims will be evaluated by examining the science of Darwin's "On the Origin of Species". The political debate will be examined first in the context of Thomas Jefferson's writings on democratic policy and science, and then from the perspective of early populist and fundamentalist reaction to Darwinism. The subsequent development of Darwinism patterns in American social, ethical, and literary thought will also be explored, as will the rise of the modern creationist movement. The course will conclude with an analysis of the political, educational, and scientific response to that movement.

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman

LIBS 120     World War II and the Cinema     3 Credit Hours

This course seeks to explore how the Second World War has been depicted to American audiences during the previous half century. It focuses on ten major films. The first half of the course examines a series of themes uppermost in the minds of directors during the conflict; the second half of the course will explore how the legacy of the war has been remembered during the previous half century.

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman

LIBS 121     East Meets West: Global Conn     3 Credit Hours

This seminar will introduce students to the following: (1) key primary sources for China and East Asia that focus on global interconnections and exchanges; (2) key theoretical issues tied to thinking about global interconnections; and (3) suggested further readings in secondary sources. Upon completion, students will be familiar with some of the basic ways to think and to find out about exchanges and interactions in world history, and to incorporate Chinese and East Asian materials (in translation) into their research.

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman

LIBS 122     Writing about College Life     3 Credit Hours

In this class we will look at how our own experiences conform to or challenge popular myths and narratives about the historical and contemporary college experience in America. We will study how college life is constructed in novels, newspapers, diaries, letters, personal interviews, essays, textbooks and films. While reading and writing about the college experience, we will address the intersection between fact and fiction and explore how print and visual representations might shape our perceptions of our world. Overall, students' own stories as college students will be crucial to the class's investigation, assessment and production of college life narratives.

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman

LIBS 123     Cognitive Science Fiction     3 Credit Hours

What does it mean to be human? Can machines fall in love? Can our consciousness be transmitted to another human being or substance? Is language fundamental to communication of thought? If so how would communication with other life forms proceed? These questions have traditionally been the domain of science fiction. However, given advances in technology, scientists are asking these questions with increasing frequency. This course explores the interplay between science and fiction. Each week we will examine a particular question through both science and fiction (book, film, etc) and see to what extent the science coincides with, or deviates from, the fiction. There will be a heavy emphasis on topics in cognitive science - an interdisciplinary science of mind and intelligence encompassing fields such as cognitive psychology, philosophy, linguistics, neuroscience and artificial intelligence.

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman

LIBS 124     Wireless World     3 Credit Hours

An examination of the impact of current Internet-based services on such fields as journalism, publishing and research. By critically examining such phenomena as blogs, social networking systems (MySpace and FaceBook), and Wikipedia, students will develop critical literacy and become more effective readers, writers and researchers.

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

LIBS 125     Apathy 2 Action: Amer Citznshp     3 Credit Hours

An examination of American citizenship as understood and practices in a variety of arenas of public life. We will examine both historical and contemporary perspectives on citizenship, including the ways in which public discourse helps situate Americans? understanding of the idea of citizenship, and by extension, the practice of democracy. In addition to exploring citizenship as it operates in the political arena and civil society, we will emphasize the role of higher education in nurturing active citizenship. This seminar includes an academic service learning requirement. Academic service learning is an educational method that integrates volunteer community service with course material to enhance the learning objectives of the course. Students will be expected to participate in a carefully-chosen and instructor-approved civic activity (e.g., volunteerism, democratic participation, public advocacy) that will highlight different models of citizenship in practice.

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman
Can enroll if College is Arts, Sciences, and Letters

LIBS 126     Anthropologists on Campus     3 Credit Hours

Anthropology professors have studied the lives of university students (My Freshman Year; Coming of Age in New Jersey). This course turns the tables, inviting new students to conduct field work on the ?hidden lives? of professors, university staff and other students. Through guided practice in ethnographic skills-interviewing and participant-observation-students will come to understand what culture means to anthropologists while exploring the multiple cultures of UM-Dearborn and gaining insights on meanings and functions of higher education.

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman
Can enroll if College is Arts, Sciences, and Letters

LIBS 127     Oceans of Data     3 Credit Hours

This course will pursue two distinct themes. The first is the triumphs of modern statistical methodology in science during the last hundred years. Definitive studies such as the Salk Vaccine Field Trials and those involving the smoking and lung cancer controversy will be examined in depth. The second theme is the awareness and use of public access databases, which are also used by researchers and policymakers. These include the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database of cancer registries, the Statistical Abstract of the United States, and SearchSystems.net Public Records Directory. The course will involve a number of readings and the interpretations of data that will form the basis of classroom discussion and written reports.

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman
Can enroll if College is Arts, Sciences, and Letters

LIBS 128     Exploring Race and Identity     3 Credit Hours

This seminar will examine a variety of models of mental health in African Americans and racial, ethnic and self-identity development. The impact of Black society, culture, family, racism and poverty on personality growth of African Americans will be explored. The history of Black psychology and the pioneer theorists who have made significant contributions to foundation and continuing study of the thoughts, feelings, behaviors and mental health of African Americans will be discussed.

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman
Can enroll if College is Arts, Sciences, and Letters

LIBS 129     Trauma, Text, & the City     3 Credit Hours

An exploration of how artists and writers represent urban trauma (terror, violence, destruction, absence) to describe indescribable suffering. In the wake of urban chaos, how do writers make urban community possible? To answer this question, we will examine traumatic events in New York City (9/11) as well as Detroit to understand how emails, photographs, novels, documentaries, and films try to narrate chaos and stabilize urban history. In addition to films that experiment with narrative (such as Memento [2000] and documentaries about 9/11 and Detroit), texts may include writings by psychologists (Freud), urban historians (Sugrue), cultural theorists (Baudrillard), and novelists (Joseph Conrad).

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman
Can enroll if College is Arts, Sciences, and Letters

LIBS 130     Liberal Arts & the Professions     3 Credit Hours

A liberal arts perspective on careers and professions. Topics include the historical relationship between a liberal arts education and professional training, the development of the concepts of ?career? and ?profession,? sociological and psychological understandings of professions and workplaces, and accounts of work in several different professions (such as journalism, teaching, and medicine). Assignments focus on enhancing the connections between academics and career preparation. Students enrolled in Libs 130 must also enroll in Exploratory Studies 102, a one-credit career-planning course that assists students in assessing their interests, skills, and values and in identifying and researching careers.

Corequisite(s): EXPS 102

LIBS 131     Understanding Global Cultures     3 Credit Hours

Globalization is the predominant interpretative concept through which we analyze the state of the planet in general, and the intermingling of cultures in particular. This course proposes a comprehensive examination of cultures around the world to first-year university students. A transdisciplinary approach (history, political science, economics, geography, and anthropology) will introduce students to a wide breadth of content and depth of contextualization, and enhance their understanding of the complexities of the (post)modern world. In addition to readings on the main groups of world cultures, we will analyze several films that address the issues of cultural identity and globality. The question of stereotyping cultures will be discussed through examples of parodic representations of cultures. The course will also address the tensions between local ways of life (historical, linguistic, ethnic, and religious) and today's pressures for transnational and multiple identities, intensified by the communication of ideas and the movement of people around the world. Thus, we will also look at how the cultures of immigrant communities in southeast Michigan have contributed to the local cultural configuration.

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman

LIBS 132     Engaging Communities     3 Credit Hours

This course studies concepts of community and service within American culture. It traces the development of civic life in the U. S. by examining the promises and challenges of community and citizenship, especially questions of inclusion and exclusion in American civic life. Students are expected to engage in some form of active citizenship with this question in mind: What individual and collective actions are most effective in making our communities into places in which each person can thrive?

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman
Can enroll if College is Arts, Sciences, and Letters

LIBS 133     Jesus and the Gospels     3 Credit Hours

Who is Jesus of Nazareth? For centuries people seeking and answer have turned to the four gospels of the New Testament. But how reliable are these texts? Were they written as biographies, histories, or to fulfill other purposes? This course will address these and other questions associated with the quest for the historical Jesus. Students will be introduced to a variety of approaches involved in the literary-historical study of the gospels and New Testament backgrounds, and learn about the methods scholars employ to move from these texts and contexts to an historical portrait of Jesus. Attention will also turn to wide range of gospels not found in the New Testament to see what light they can shed on the Jesus? identity.

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman
Can enroll if College is Arts, Sciences, and Letters

LIBS 134     Nano-fiction     3 Credit Hours

Students in this seminar will explore a collection of extremely short stories-weird and wonderful stories that manage to ignite the imagination and evoke complex realities in just a few pages. Discussion of the stories, guided by provocative questions and thought experiments, will help students develop ways to navigate texts, subtexts, and contexts at a college level; to write more critically and analytically; and to read with more confidence and passion. The seminar will incorporate a series of short, focused writing assignments and some creative research projects. The goal is to discover rich worlds in tiny packages?.and return safely, if somewhat altered, to the real world.

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman
Can enroll if College is Arts, Sciences, and Letters

LIBS 135     Urban Monsters&Suburb Angels     3 Credit Hours

If cities are the centers of human civilization, then why have we inherited such horrific stereotypes of urban environments? This course analyzes how writers (screenwriters, dramatists, urban theories, architects novelists, and poets) tried to reimagine cities (both in America and Britain) as both a unified community of English-speaking individuals and a globalizing model of ?civilized? social organization between 1660 and the present. In doing so, the course argues that our understanding the ?monstrous? connotations of cities depends upon our imagining the simultaneous creation of morally ?angelic? middle-class suburbs in both gothic and horror writing and visual art. Reading may include Dracula, Journal of a Plague Year, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Linden Hills, and The Jungle.

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman
Can enroll if College is Arts, Sciences, and Letters

LIBS 136     Bad Decisions     3 Credit Hours

The course is based on a recent book by Daniel Kahneman, entitled "Thinking, Fast and Slow". The book is based on the premise that the human brain supports two different modes of thought: (a) a largely unconscious mode that is capable of processing large amounts of information quite quickly, and (b) a slower mode that operates more on the basis of logic. The goals of the course would be to (a) make sure students understand these two modes and the accompanying data and rationale that support the two modes, (b) understand and be able to apply the fairly simple methodology that underlies many of the related experiments, (c) improve one's own thinking by learning when to rely on each of the two systems and how to avoid the pitfalls associated with each, and (d) be able to extend the literature by performing novel follow-up experiments based on those already performed.

Corequisite(s):

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman
Can enroll if College is Arts, Sciences, and Letters

LIBS 137     American Horror Storied     3 Credit Hours

This course analyzes American culture through the lens of its horror industry: in film, literature, art, and other forms of artistic and popular culture. Horror, because of its nature as an extreme form of representation and its association with the imagination rather than reality, has the ability to reveal certain truths and theories about history, culture, and ways of being that are difficult to access through other modes of expression. This course explores these truths and theories by studying American horrors in a way that contextualizes film, stories, art, and other forms of popular culture within particular social, political, and historical moments. Examples include: Cold War horror productions (the short stories of H.P. Lovecraft and Richard Matheson) and the use of aliens and other invaders as a stand in for outsiders and ?others,? domestic horrors like The Nightmare on Elm Street and Beloved and the ways in which violence, gender, race and the home intersect, and a study of post-feminist heroines in Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Pretty Little Liars.

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman
Can enroll if College is Arts, Sciences, and Letters

LIBS 138     Wild Thing:Attitudes-Animals     3 Credit Hours

This course is an interdisciplinary study of the concepts of what it means to be human and how that compares with other animal species. By examining the various ways in which nonhuman animals are objectified in their relationship to humans through religious teachings, portrayed in the media sometimes anthropomorphically, and the ways in which humans make use of animals, students will engage in their own academic inquiry leading to in-depth class discussions about the concept of what it means to be a human and a nonhuman animal. These investigations and discussions will be based on readings and other sources to guide students? understanding of their own and other?s attitudes to human and nonhuman animals within societies and cross-culturally.

Corequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman
Can enroll if College is Arts, Sciences, and Letters

LIBS 139     Crossing Boundaries     3 Credit Hours

FULL TITLE: Crossing Bounaries: Passing and Social Identity in American History Have you ever thought that life would be easier if you had been born a different person? This course examines the stories of boundary crossers: individuals who acted on that desire and 'passed' for a member of a different social group. People who have lived on both sides of a social identity offer a unique opportunity to understand the meaning of race, class, gender, and sexual orientation in American society. Their experiences can help us understand social categories and how they have changed over the course of history. What, for example can a person who lived as both a woman and a man tell us about the significance of gender in our society? (OC)

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

LIBS 191     Returning Adult Learners     1 Credit Hour

LIBS 191 is designed to provide returning adult students with the support, skills, and knowledge needed for academic success at the University of Michigan ? Dearborn. Students will discover productive learning strategies, build a supportive network of peers, and explore campus resources by examining, through selected readings and assignments, the broader social, cultural, and individual context of being a non-traditional student on a university campus.

LIBS 200     Computer Literacy     1 to 3 Credit Hours

An introductory course in computing for students who do not intend to become computer programmers or designers. The course explores the nature and origins of computing, and examines its uses and limitations in such applications as teaching/learning, buying/selling and information storage/retrieval. The social implications of the computer revolution will be examined and limited programming will be provided with a small, home computer.

LIBS 275     GIEU: Global Intercultural Exp     3 Credit Hours

Global Intercultural Experience for Undergraduates. LIBS 275 is an interdisciplinary experiential introduction to intercultural learning that prepares diverse undergraduate students from various colleges for field experience interactions, and then helps students bring these experiences back to campus in socially and academically productive ways. It is a series of concentrated seminars of orientation, debriefing, and symposium.

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Specialist or Graduate or Doctorate

LIBS 276     GIEU: Leadership     2 Credit Hours

The Global Intercultural Experience for Undergraduates (GIEU) Leadership Seminar provides leadership training and experience for exceptional students nominated by faculty from those having completed LIBS 275. In addition to participating in a group seminar, each student will be matched with a faculty mentor in preparing for and leading an upcoming GIEU field experience. These peer leaders will have two primary responsibilities: to help in team formation for the new field site; and to assist faculty members on site with logistics, peer communication, and organization. In addition to their practical experience, each participant will complete reflection exercises and essays.

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Specialist or Graduate or Doctorate

LIBS 290     Topics in Liberal Studies     1 to 3 Credit Hours

A lower-level topics course. Title as listed in Schedule of Classes will change according to content. Course may be repeated for credit when specific topics differ. (OC).

LIBS 320     Library Research Skills     1 Credit Hour

This course is designed to teach and strengthen the information competency and research skills of college students. This course provides students with life-long learning skills needed to access, evaluate, and utilize information resources, including full-text article databases, internet resources, online catalogs, as well as materials traditionally located in the library.

LIBS 330     Innovators-Project Development     3 Credit Hours

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of the Honors Transfer Innovators (HTI) Experience. HTI is a project based, collaborative learning community with a focus on self-transformation, creativity, diversity, leadership, and reflection. We explore these themes through readings, small group projects, and mentorship from senior students in the 400 level course, as well as the use of educational technology, and community engagement. This course is only open to students admitted into the HTI learning community.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Sophomore or Junior or Senior
Can enroll if Attribute is Honors Transfer Innovators

LIBS 364     The European Union     3 Credit Hours

This course examines the history and politics of European integration, notably institutional development, decision-making procedures and dynamics, and policy formulation in the European Union. The course will concentrate on the intergovernmental conferences and treaty reform, the relationship between European politics at the subnational, national and supranational levels; the role of national, institutional, and non-state actors; problems of accountability and legitimacy; the economic and monetary union; and enlargement. The course will also address questions of globalization and technology, and the American perception of the EU. (OC).

Prerequisite(s): COMP 105

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Level is Undergraduate

LIBS 395     Co-op Education Work Assignmnt     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Student is eligible to compete for job openings listed with the co-op office by employers. After application and interview, employers hire the student best suited to employer's job needs. Study/career-related paid positions are either alternating full-time or parallel part-time. Under a cooperative work agreement the student submits academic learning objectives and evaluations to co-op faculty advisor, who, upon review of employer evaluation, determines credit for co-op learning experience. Students must fulfill the seminar and study term requirements of the program.

LIBS 396     Adv Co-op Work Assignment     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Students who have completed two terms of LIBS 395 may move on to LIBS 396, which offers advanced training in career-related topics, especially leadership. In addition to fulfilling the work-site terms of the placement, students are required to submit leadership goals as part of their Learning objectives and leadership assessment as part of their end of term evaluation. Oral report on how leaderships objectives fared in the workplace will be presented to members of the seminar, LIBS 300. LIBS 395 is a prerequisite for LIBS 396.

Prerequisite(s): LIBS 395

LIBS 397     Adv Co-op Work Assignment II     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Students who have completed two terms of LIBS 395 and two terms of LIBS 396 may move on to LIBS 397, in which students assess their placement in the light of research on the topic of good work. In addition to fulfilling the work-site terms of the placement, students are required to conduct informational interviews of professionals in their field, including people on the work site, with special focus on that aspect of professionalism where excellence and ethics intersect. The results of interviews will be reported in the end-of-term placement evaluation. LIBS 395 and LIBS 396 are prerequisites or LIBS 397.

Prerequisite(s): LIBS 395 and LIBS 396

LIBS 430     Innovators Capstone     3 Credit Hours

LIBS 430 is a three-credit hour practicum based course that serves as the capstone for the Honors Transfer Innovators (HTI) Experience. Students will engage in theoretical, collaborative, and project based learning experiences focused on peer mentoring, project completion, and creative leadership. Based on these experiences, students will identify best practices that are applicable to mentoring HTI 300 level students and develop a set of principles to guide their mentoring relationship. Students in this course will mentor HTI 300 students who will be crafting their project proposals. In addition students in this course will complete an M-Portfolio documenting their HTI experience.

Prerequisite(s): LIBS 330

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Sophomore or Junior or Senior
Can enroll if Attribute is Honors Transfer Innovators

LIBS 442     Medical Ethics     3 Credit Hours

An examination of moral issues in medicine. Among the problems to be considered are truth-telling and paternalism in the doctor-patient relationship, psychosurgery and behavior control, death and euthanasia, the allocation of scarce resources, and genetic counseling and control. Specific attention will be given to ethical theories and to philosophical concepts such as rights, autonomy, and justice.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 240

LIBS 464     Literature and Science Studies     3 Credit Hours

An introduction to the humanistic study of science using works of literature and the techniques of literary, historical, sociological, philosophical, cultural, feminist, and rhetorical analysis. Students cannot receive credit for both LIBS 464 and LIBS 564. Student seeking graduate credit should elect LIBS 564.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Senior

LIBS 466     Investigatng Academic Literacy     3 Credit Hours

Intensive investigation of, and practice with, writing and research skills required for graduate-level work. Through regular assignments, guided reading of a variety of texts, and intensive work with instructor/s and one another, students will explore what it means to produce academic discourse, learn its conventions, and develop skills in written analysis. Students cannot receive credit for both LIBS 466 and LIBS 566. Students seeking graduate credit should elect LIBS 566.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Senior

LIBS 467     Self in Philosophy/Literature     3 Credit Hours

This course will utilize both philosophical and literary texts to examine the nature of self. We will explore the self?s capacity for self-knowledge and self-deception, its relation to others, its connection to gender, its existence as body, and finally its desire to disown and flee itself. The philosophical texts will provide theoretical structures within which to both experience and discuss the literary texts. Students cannot receive credit for both LIBS 467 and LIBS 567. Students seeking graduate credit should elect LIBS 567.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Senior

LIBS 471     Science & Phil of Emotions     3 Credit Hours

This course will examine how philosophers, scientists, and psychologists in the past analyzed the emotions in order to set the stage for an examination of more recent work on the emotions currently being produced in philosophy, psychology, and the neurosciences. We will use these analyses to explore the following topics: the mental and physical components of emotions, the relation between reason and emotion, and the understanding of the emotions of others. Students cannot receive credit for both LIBS 471 and LIBS 571. Students seeking graduate credit should elect LIBS 571.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Senior

LIBS 480     Gender, Culture, and Identity     3 Credit Hours

This is a course about how scholars analyze women, gender, and feminist theories. It introduces students to key questions about gender and the principal methods for studying them. It will serve as a forum for building and testing theories on the totality of women?s experience. Student cannot receive credit for both LIBS 480 and LIBS 580. Students seeking graduate credit should elect LIBS 580.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Senior

LIBS 484     Env St:Concepts and Philosophy     3 Credit Hours

An extensive and intensive analysis of the roots of environmental studies. Environmental studies becomes meta-disciplinary as it makes connections between the traditional disciplines in the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and technological sciences when dealing with current environmental issues. The students will examine and discuss the philosophical, scientific, social, and religious basis of the environmental movements through classical and contemporary readings. Possible topics will include: views of nature, sustainability, carrying capacity, management of commons, the environment of cities, and developing a sense of place. Students cannot receive credit for both LIBS 484 and LIBS 584. Students seeking graduate credit should elect LIBS 584.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Senior

LIBS 485     Watershed Analysis     3 Credit Hours

An interdisciplinary study of watersheds, the most commonly used bioregional unit. The course will integrate the analysis of many factors which contribute to the character of watersheds, including bedrock and surficial geology, surface and groundwater hydrology, social history, land use history, water quality analysis, biological diversity, laws and regulations, management models, drinking water and wastewater, best management practices, and educational programs. The Rouge River Watershed will serve as the primary case study. Students cannot receive credit for both LIBS 485 and LIBS 585. Student seeking graduate credit should elect LIBS 585.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Senior

LIBS 487     Women and Public Spaces     3 Credit Hours

Despite old and persistent myths of a woman?s place being in the home, women in America have consistently maintained a presence in public spaces. Their participation, however, was not unfettered. Laws, social mores, familial and religious restraints, etiquette, the threat of violence, lack of funds, and other factors influenced and restricted women?s behavior when in public and structured society?s reactions to their presence. This course will consider the development of these codes of behavior (formal and informal), how women of different ethnicities, races, sexual orientations, and classes experienced their effects, and the ways in which women sought to temper and undermine the system, particularly in the twentieth century. The course will provide an interdisciplinary approach to historic, social, physical, economic, and cultural geographies through which women have traveled. Students cannot receive credit for both LIBS 487 and LIBS 587. Student seeking graduate credit should elect LIBS 587.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Senior

 
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An asterisk denotes that a course may be taken concurrently.

Frequency of Offering

The following abbreviations are used to denote the frequency of offering: (F) fall term; (W) winter term; (S) summer term; (F, W) fall and winter terms; (YR) once a year; (AY) alternating years; (OC) offered occasionally