Energy Systems Engineering

Energy Systems Engineering is a 30-credit hour inter-disciplinary master’s program, designed to provide systems-based knowledge in sustainable energy through four core courses and in-depth knowledge in vehicular energy and distributed energy through six elective courses. 

Students entering the program should have an undergraduate degree in an engineering discipline from an accredited engineering program. Students with undergraduate degree in physics and chemistry may also be admitted in the program after completion of selected undergraduate engineering courses determined upon evaluation of their educational background.

The undergraduate cumulative GPA required is B (3.0/4.0) or better for admission as a regular graduate student in the program. An applicant with a lower GPA may be considered for conditional/probationary admission consistent with the Rackham guidelines. Each applicant must present at least one complete, official transcript of all prior college work.

The student must complete at least 30 semester hours of graduate work approved by the program advisor/graduate advisory committee with a grade of at least a B covering all courses elected. No more than one B- will be allowed under any circumstances.

Curriculum

Core Courses 1
ESE 500Sustainable Energy Systems3
ESE 501Energy Conversion3
or ESE 502 Energy Storage Systems
ESE 503Energy Policy, Econ & Environ3
ESE 504Energy Eval/Risk&Optimization3
Concentration Courses
Select 18 credit hours of the following:18
Automotive:
Automotive Powertrains I
Design&Manufac for Environment
Internal Combustion Engines I
Energy Sys for Auto Vehicles
Elec Aspects of Hybrid Vehicle
Automotive Powertrains II
Internal Combustion Engines II
Engine Emissions
Adv Elec Drive Transportation
Electric Power:
Adv Pwr Electrncs&Motor Drvs
Adv Topics in EMC
Intr to Pwr Mgmt & Reliability
Advanced Power Electronics
General:
Structural Analysis
Advanced Stress Analysis
Advanced Fluid Mechanics
Computational Thermo-Fluids
Fund of Boiling and Condensatn
Combustion Processes
Advanced Thermodynamics
Fracture and Fatig Cons in Des
Conduction Heat Transfer
Convection Heat Transfer
Degradation of Materials
Modern Control Theory
Digital Control Systems
Digital Signal Processing
Optimal Control Systems
Fundamentals of Program Mgt
Project Management and Control
Eng Risk-Benefit Analysis
Program Budget, Cost Est & Con
Tot Qual Mgmt and Six Sigma
Supply Chain Management
Reliability Analysis
Total Credit Hours30
1

All 4 courses are required.

Additional elective courses from other units in UM-Dearborn  may also be considered with the ESE program director’s approval.  

Thesis option may be elected with the approval of the graduate program director. It will count for six (6) credit hours of graduate coursework replacing two courses in the Elective area.

This certificate in Energy Systems Engineering (ESE) provides a systems-based knowledge in energy engineering through 4 courses dealing with sustainable energy sources, energy generation and storage, hybrid-electric vehicles, alternative vehicle energy systems, emissions, power electronics, distribution to manufacturing for the environment, energy and environmental policies, and risk-benefit analysis. Students in this certificate program have to complete 12 credit hours. 

Certificate available on Campus and via Distance Learning

Coursework

Select 4 courses from the following:
Internal Combustion Engines I
Intr to Pwr Mgmt & Reliability
Sustainable Energy Systems
Energy Conversion
Energy Storage Systems
Energy Policy, Econ & Environ
Energy Eval/Risk&Optimization
Internal Combustion Engines II
Engine Emissions

ESE 500     Sustainable Energy Systems     3 Credit Hours

The course provides an overview of energy technology from a broad perspective that encompasses technical and environmental aspects. It covers a wide range of traditional and alternative energy sources and presents assessments of their availability, sustainability, and environmental impacts as well as evaluation of their potential role in solving the global energy problem. Course work includes project.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Graduate
Can enroll if Level is Graduate or Rackham
Can enroll if College is Engineering and Computer Science

ESE 501     Energy Conversion     3 Credit Hours

This course covers fundamental engineering principles for converting available energy sources, renewable and nonrenewable, into other energy forms of direct utility. It may include such topics as steam and gas based power plants as well as devices for solar, wind, and hydraulic energy conversion.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Graduate
Can enroll if Level is Graduate or Rackham
Can enroll if College is Engineering and Computer Science

ESE 502     Energy Storage Systems     3 Credit Hours

This course introduces the basics of energy storage systems for EDV. It will cover battery basics, ultracapacitors, flywheels, and hybrid energy storage concepts. Battery management, battery charging, and battery safety will be covered. Finally, the requirements of EDV and renewable energy application examples will be explained. Lead acid, nickel metal hydride, and lithium ion batteries will be covered. Other energy storage systems such as super conducting magnetic, hydraulic, compressed air, and integrated (hybrid) energy storage systems, will be discussed as well.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Graduate
Can enroll if Level is Rackham or Doctorate or Graduate
Can enroll if College is Engineering and Computer Science
Can enroll if Major is Automotive Systems Engineering, Industrial & Systems Engin, Computer & Information Science, Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering, Software Engineering

ESE 503     Energy Policy, Econ & Environ     3 Credit Hours

This course will give an overview of the current energy and environment policies, their origin and implementation, and the process of developing such policies. It will consider the public policy issues related to alternative and renewable energy systems at both national and international levels. The roles of government, industry and consumers in making these policies will be discussed. The economics of various alternative energies will be considered and trade-offs between them will be discussed from the viewpoint of availability, safety, environmental impact and related issues.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Graduate
Can enroll if College is Engineering and Computer Science

ESE 504     Energy Eval/Risk&Optimization     3 Credit Hours

Formulation of economically efficient strategies and development plans for energy systems requires a sound understanding of energy supply, demand and allocation options as well as the interrelationships between the energy sector, environment, and the economy. Analysis of these energy policy decisions requires evaluation of investment decisions on potential energy projects (and programs) in terms of selected project viability indicators and comparison against a set of decision criteria. This course will provide students the knowledge and skills to identify, analyze, assess, and manage the risks inherent in selecting various energy sources, projects and portfolios of projects. The tools and techniques explored in this class will be applied to energy, environment and resource management policy and investment decisions which are multi-criteria including societal cost and environmental impacts.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Graduate
Can enroll if College is Engineering and Computer Science

ESE 591     Guided Stud in Energy Systems     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Individual or group study of an energy systems engineering topic of contemporary interest.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Graduate
Can enroll if College is Engineering and Computer Science

ESE 699     Master's Thesis     3 to 6 Credit Hours

Research for master's thesis under the direction of a faculty adviser.

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Graduate
Can enroll if College is Engineering and Computer Science

 
*

An asterisk denotes that a course may be taken concurrently.

Frequency of Offering

The following abbreviations are used to denote the frequency of offering: (F) fall term; (W) winter term; (S) summer term; (F, W) fall and winter terms; (YR) once a year; (AY) alternating years; (OC) offered occasionally