Health and Human Service (HHS)

HHS 100     Personal Health and Wellness     3 Credit Hours

In this course, students will examine the core concepts, conceptual frameworks, and epidemiological data related to personal health and wellness. Students will learn to apply the scientific method to the systematic study of common health problems. Students will gain a better understanding of their own health-related attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors and learn strategies to manage their stress and improve their health and wellness. (F,S,W)

HHS 101     Intro to Health Education     3 Credit Hours

This course is designed to introduce students to the principles and practices of health education. Students will explore the theoretical and practical issues of health education and will identify and apply health education principles to health challenges facing individuals, groups and communities. (F,W,S)

HHS 200     Introduction to Public Health     3 Credit Hours

Introduction to Public Health (HHS 200) is the introductory professional course in the Public Health undergraduate program. This course identifies and explores the theoretical and practical issues in public health. Students successfully completing the course will have an understanding of the goals of public health. Students will receive a fundamental understanding of epidemiological study design and the role of data for public health research. They will also understand the impact of individual behaviors and the environment on health. Lastly, students will receive an introduction of the role of governmental agencies and policy on public health practice.

HHS 201     Medical Terminology     3 Credit Hours

This course will focus on an in-depth presentation of medical language to serve as a solid foundation for students interested in health care, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, physical therapy, or related careers. Medical terminology for both health and disease is presented in relation to human structure and function. Understanding of the course content builds a framework by introducing the key terms as they are applied to specific body systems. (F,W,S)

HHS 202     Mental Health Terminology     3 Credit Hours

Mental Health Medical Terminology orients students to mental health disorders. A brief clinical overview from a lay perspective orients students to the various mental disorders including mental retardation and learning disorders, behavioral disorders, anxiety disorders, substance abuse disorders, impulse control disorders and sleep disorders. A special emphasis will be made on the relationship between substance abuse problems and mental illness, as well as the physical aspects of drug use. Students learn the specific criteria for mental illness classification through use of The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM 5). (OC)

HHS 210     Intro to Social Work     3 Credit Hours

Introduction to Social Work is intended to provide a basic introductory course to assist professionals in related and relevant fields in the theories, approaches, and practices of social work. Students will be exposed to the art and science of the social work discipline through academic research and case studies, experiential learning, group discussion, and supporting activities. (F,W,S)

HHS 230     Research Methods in Human Srvc     3 Credit Hours

This course focuses on developing student's ability to understand and influence scientific inquiry in health and human services. Students will learn how research methodology frames inquiry and, subsequently, how knowledge is built and used to make evidence-based decisions in practice.

HHS 250     Intro to Environmental Health     3 Credit Hours

This course introduces students to environmental health as a core discipline within the field of public health. It is for any student interested in how the environments where we live, work, and play may affect our health, and it is particularly applicable for those pursuing careers in public health, clinical health, or allied fields. Specifically, the course provides students with an introduction to environmental health science, communication, and policy. Students will examine many case studies to understand the patterning and implications of environmental risks and protective factors in communities through Metro Detroit and the U.S. related to several key pathways (e.g., air, water, climate, built environment). Throughout the semester, considerable attention will be given to causes and consequences of local and national environmental justice issues. Students will gain exposure to methods and resources they may use to assess and address environmental health concerns as scholars, activists, or practitioners. (W)

HHS 260     Global Health     3 Credit Hours

In this course, students will examine the core concepts, major actors and organizations, and functions of public health on a global scale. Students will gain knowledge of comparative health care systems, as well as global challenges, such as climate change, nutrition, and maternal and child health. We will analyze historic and contemporary case studies to better understand current disease burden and health inequities, ethical considerations, and potential policy or programmatic solutions to global health issues. (YR)

HHS 300     Intro to Health Policy     3 Credit Hours

The aim of this course is to provide students with an overview of the U.S. health care system, its components, and the policy challenges created by its organization. We will focus on the major US governmental and non-governmental political and policy players, health policy institutions and important issues that cut across institutions, including private insurers and the federal/state financing programs (Medicare and Medicaid/SCHIP) (F,W,S)

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

HHS 305     Introduction to Play     3 Credit Hours

This course introduces the concept, theory, and experience of play, including methodological approaches to the research and study of play in therapeutic, clinical, medical, and educational environments. Students will develop strategies for observing, engaging, and supporting play in variety of settings, and will gain an understanding of the principles, applications, and limitations of play therapy and the role of play in the practice of professionals in human services and education. (F,W,S)

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

HHS 306     Program Plan Implementation     3 Credit Hours

Full Course Title: Program Planning and Implementation This course introduces students to program planning in health and human service settings. In these settings, leaders must be able to develop, implement, and monitor programs that are informed by theory and evidence. Such plans equip organizations to improve individual, family and community well-being through programmatic interventions, as well as to advocate for local or national policy changes. Students will examine existing programs designed to promote health and well-being in diverse settings locally and nationally. They will learn components of effective program plans and work through a stepwise process to build their own plan for a real or imagined intervention. Prior or concurrent coursework in theory of health behavior or social work and research methods is highly recommended.

Prerequisite(s): COMP 106

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior

HHS 308     Intro to Macro Social Work     3 Credit Hours

This course examines generalist community and administrative practice roles, the perspectives of strength, empowerment, and evidence-based practice along with the values of social justice, diversity, and participation. Specific attention is given to designing intervention programs that address community needs. (F,W,S)

Prerequisite(s): SWK 200 or HHS 210

HHS 309     Theories & Pract. Social Wk.     3 Credit Hours

Full Course Title: Theories & Pract. Social Wk. This course is designed to develop the knowledge and skills necessary for students to begin understanding of the practice of social work. The course provides an overview of general practice and theory. Students are introduced to the value, philosophy and knowledge base considerations of social work practice. Generalist social work practice is presented as a process of planned change with various clients and systems as well as the application of ethical and technical principles of practice. Specific emphasis will be given in this course to the integration of material from the student's knowledge of human behavior, social policy, research, life experience, and professional skills. Lessons and exercises are offered to emphasize understanding and relating to persons of diverse backgrounds including oppressed groups, populations-at risk and racial or ethnic minorities. (F,W,S)

Prerequisite(s): SWK 200 or HHS 210

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

HHS 310     System of Care     3 Credit Hours

This course introduces students to the ways that health and human service organizations work individually and collectively to improve the lives of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Health and human services professionals work collaboratively to help persons with a variety of physical, mental, social, emotional, educational, and developmental needs. Systems of care is a service delivery approach that builds partnerships to create a broad, integrated process for meeting clients' and target populations' multiple needs. (YR)

HHS 311     Work w/Vulnerable Populations     3 Credit Hours

Full Course Title: Working with Vulnerable and Hard-to-reach-Populations Successful community-based engagement, outreach activities, and intervention research often involves working with vulnerable and hard-to-reach populations. This course examines some of the personal, social, institutional, legal and environmental factors that create disparities and vulnerabilities in certain individuals and groups. Underlying theories, effective strategies, and best strategies for working with persons in great need for improved health and the provision of appropriate human services are also presented. (F,W,S)

Prerequisite(s): SWK 200 or HHS 210

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

HHS 312     Family Preservation & Recovery     3 Credit Hours

Current methods for family preservation and helping families cope with family problems are the focus of this seminar style course. Through lectures, written assignments and classroom activities, students learn and practice family intervention technique. Emphasis on families with diverse structures is undertaken and diverse practice settings including home, school, child welfare, mental health, family court, corrections and other community environments are explored in detail. Students are instructed in the special issues in work w/families, e.g. minority status, gender and sexual orientation, disabilities, family violence, trauma and addiction. (F,W,S)

Prerequisite(s): SWK 200 or HHS 210

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

HHS 313     Metro Impact of HHS     3 Credit Hours

Full Course Title: Metropolitan Impact of Health and Human Services This course focuses on health and human service provision and the impacts of these professions within the metropolitan Detroit area. The course addresses working with multiple populations and multiple service providers. A significant component of the course consists of significant gues speakers who have experience working in this area. The class will often meet off-campus at various social service agencies; students will be responsible for their own transportation.

Prerequisite(s): SWK 200 or HHS 210

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

HHS 315     Case Management for Change     3 Credit Hours

Students learn step-by-step processes of case management from intake and initial referral for services, determination of eligibility for services, writing a formal plan for services, case documentation techniques, and techniques for monitoring a clients progress through the service delivery system, to case closure/follow-up activities. The course instructs on access to community resources, interpreting and utilizing information from other professionals, and development of interviewing, intervention, case recording, and caseload management skills. Legal and ethical issues in service delivery are integrated throughout the course. (F,W,S)

HHS 325     Death, Dying, and Bereavement     3 Credit Hours

This course focuses on working with children, adolescents, and families experiencing dying, death, and grief. The course emphasizes the role of families, culture, and healthcare settings, as well as the social meanings of dying and death, developmental perceptions, and the impact of culture, religion, and ethnicity. Specific attention is given to grief reactions in children, the application of developmental level in response to loss, role of human services professionals in clincial and non-clinical settings, as well as the tasks of grief. Strategies and tools relating to communicating with bereaved children, as well as the potential impact on academic, behavioral, and emotional development are addressed. Students will explore and develop familiarity with strategies and tools such as legacy building, memento creation, and the identification and utilization of resources that promote coping skills in relation to death or impending death. (F,W,S)

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HHS 336     Perspectives in Women's Health     3 Credit Hours

This course examines women's health issues across the human lifespan, using feminist and sociocultural perspectives. Topics to be explored include the social construction of women's sexuality, reproductive options, health care alternatives and risk for physical and mental illness. Attention to the historical, economic, and cultural factors that influence the physical and psychological well-being of women is an underlying theme. (F,W,S)

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

HHS 349     Sobriety Credit     1 Credit Hour

The course uses a combination of seminar meetings, reflection writing, community engagement and experiential learning to emphasize the barriers and hardships faced by substance users who become involved in treatment, whether that involvement is mandatory or voluntary. Students are required to go through the same documentation procedures as those in treatment (and drug court) which require the presentation of a clean urine report and signed forms of attendance at AA or NA meetings. Students are asked to write weekly reflection papers detailing any difficulties that they experience. The class meets once a month in a seminar fashion to discuss the reflection writing. (OC)

HHS 350     Comm Organizing for Health     3 Credit Hours

Community organizing is a process by which communities and organizations work together to identify common problems and objectives, acquire and mobilize resources, and create and implement actions to achieve their goals. Community organizing is of interest to sociologists, organization theorists, political scientists, health educators, and social psychologists, among others, as scholars who contribute to our knowledge of working in and with communities. Drawing on these various disciplines and real world case studies, this course examines community organizing theories, models, and principles and how they are used to improve community health and address health inequities. Several practical tools, strategies, and skills are also introduced, including: community assessment, coalition-building, participatory research and evaluation, media advocacy, and policy advocacy. A primary component of this course is the field experience, in which students are partnered with community-based organizations to identify, apply, and reflect on course concepts, while contributing to local community building efforts related to various health issues in the Detroit Metropolitan region.

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HHS 360     Responsible Drug Policy     3 Credit Hours

A study of the fundamentals needed for identifying both the appearance and effects of controlled substances. Students receive guides to controlled substances; their color, trade names and drug codes. Topics include a critical examination of the physiological, sociological and legal aspects of drug abuse and the many complexities which have developed as a direct or indirect result of drug policy in society. (OC)

HHS 364     Health Policy and Admin     3 Credit Hours

A survey of the structure and processes of health administration in America, including analysis of current issues in health policy.

HHS 370     Medicine and Addiction I     3 Credit Hours

Medicine and Addiction I is part one in the sequence of introductory coursework in the Addiction Studies Certificate Program. This course provides the clinical orientation for addiction that frames much of the activities associated with screening and assessment of client behaviors as well as aspects of intervention and management of clients with addiction. Students successfully completing the course will identify and apply the assessment principles for individuals and families dealing with addiction. (OC)

HHS 371     Medicine and Addiction II     3 Credit Hours

Medicine and Addiction I is part two in the sequence of introductory coursework in the Addiction Studies Certificate Program. This course provides the clinical orientation for addiction that frames much of the activities associated with screening and assessment of client behaviors as well as aspects of intervention and management of clients with addiction. Students successfully completing the course will identify and apply the treatment principles for individuals and families dealing with addiction. (OC)

Prerequisite(s): HHS 370

HHS 380     Religion, Medicine, and Health     3 Credit Hours

This interdisciplinary discussion course examines topics and research methods in the historical, sociological, psychological, and anthropological intersections between religion, medicine, and health for its effects on the understanding of illness and disease, health agency, death and dying, and other aspects of the illness experiience. (YR)

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Sophomore or Junior or Senior

HHS 400     Health Policy and Politics     3 Credit Hours

This course will examine the politics of the health policy process, through a critical review of the roles, relationships, motivations, and strategies of key political actors, structures, and institutions that comprise the policymaking process in the United States. The objective is to prepare students to serve as effective policy or political advocates. We will review and discuss conceptual models of policymaking and politics in order to contextualize real-life health policy processes and decisions. (YR)

Prerequisite(s): HHS 300

HHS 401     Methods of Health Promotion     3 Credit Hours

This course is designed to prepare students with skills necessary to implement health education programs within the context of community health settings. Emphasis will be placed on a variety of community health education methods and strategies including but not limited to educational presentations and material development, mass media and media advocacy, legislative action and involvement, community organization, and working with groups. (F,W,S)

Prerequisite(s): CHE 101 or HHS 101 and CHE 201 or HHS 201

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HHS 402     Public Health Internship     3 Credit Hours

This internship provides students the opportunity to apply classroom learning and gain hands-on experience inside a public health work environment at the Michigan Department of Community Health. The experience allows students to build valuable networking connections with local and state public health professional leaders as well as explore a career choice within public health. The course focuses on exposure to state and local program analysis while students develop marketable job skills and core public health competencies. (F, W, S)

Prerequisite(s): CHE 101 and HHS 200

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Freshman

HHS 403     Medical Information Systems     3 Credit Hours

Medical Information Systems deals with how information is created, stored, and used in health care settings. Areas of interest for this course include fundamentals of computers and data management, medical information documentation in the form of paper and electronic medical records, health data privacy issues, disease classification and scoring systems, quality assurance in health care delivery, commonly used health care statistics, reimbursement methodologies, health care monitoring by internal processes and external review agencies, and vital statistics and disease surveillance systems. The course also includes some hands-on computer applications instruction to familiarize students with commonly used software platforms utilized in health care administration. (F,W,S)

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HHS 404     Financing Health & Medical Sys     3 Credit Hours

The American health care system faces two problems: access to health services and high and rising costs. This course looks at the problems of uninsured citizens as well as the strains placed on health care facilities in providing services for them. Europeans have dealt with problems of access and cost controls through universal health care coverage and the course takes up various models in use today. The course also looks at American health insurance and "managed care" programs such as HMOs and PPOs as methods of providing health coverage as well as controlling costs. The course introduces students to services provided by the government including Medicare, Medicaid and State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). Students will learn the basics of creating a budget under constraints such as contractual limitations and Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRGs).

Prerequisite(s): ECON 201

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HHS 405     Population Health     3 Credit Hours

Population Health is defined as encompassing the health outcomes of a group of individuals as well as the distribution of those outcomes as related to the social determinants of health. Lectures, discussions, and group exercises focus on the impact of composite indicatiors in relation to population health including medical and health care, policy, genetics, behavior, social structures, and environmental factors. (F, W)

Prerequisite(s): HHS 200 or CHE 101

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman

HHS 406     Program Evaluation     3 Credit Hours

This course will provide an introduction to kep concepts in program evaluation. Students will learn about the systematic steps involved in evaluating public programs for efficiency and effectiveness. The course will rely on case studies, text examples, and discussion.

HHS 407     Fund & Grant     3 Credit Hours

Full Course Title: Fundraising & Grant-writing in Health & Human Services This course introduces students to the ways that health and human service programs secure resources to expand and improve their services, reach vulnerable or marginalized populations, and address existing or emerging social conditions. The primary focus of the course is on the development of grantseeking skills, but students will also gain exposure to a variety of fundraising approaches that may be relevant over the course of their career. Students will learn componenets of effective grant proposals and gain technical knowledge on designing supporting fundraising documents, such as budgets and project timelines. Students will work through a stepwise process to build their own grant proposal for a real or imagined program. Recommended pre-requisites include HHS 360 and/or HHS 460. (YR)

Prerequisite(s): COMP 106

Restriction(s):
Can enroll if Class is Junior or Senior

HHS 410     Quantitative Research     3 Credit Hours

Full Course Title: Statistics in Health and Human Services An introduction to methods of data collection and analysis. Elementary statistical data are analyzed using computerized statistics programs. A discussion of research design and the philosophy of social science applied to answering health and human service questions.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HHS 412     Principles of Epidemiology     3 Credit Hours

The study of the frequency and distribution, as well as the causes and control, of disease in human populations. Using data analysis tools, one can identify causes of disease and the effects of prevention and treatment. This course is an application of research design to determine the extent of which environment (toxins, for instance), heredity, childhood development, and lifestyle influence morbidity and mortality rates. (F,W,S)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 410 or HPS 410 or HHS 410 or CRJ 410

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HHS 415     Healthcare Administration     3 Credit Hours

This course introduces students to administrative models and skills that can be used at a supervisory level. These conceptions include strategic planning, marketing, organizational communications, quality assurance, project management and team skills, supervision and evaluation, conflict resolution and office cultures and politics. A critical and historical perspective is used to understand the origins and meanings of these conceptions and the extent to which they correspond with the service mentality of health and human services. Applications to the health and human services will be central to the course. (F,W,S)

Prerequisite(s): HPS 440 or HHS 440

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HHS 425     Work w/Child in Health Setting     3 Credit Hours

Full Course Title: Working with Children in Healthcare Settings This course is essential for students interested in working in health care settings, with children or pediatric populations, and in particular for persons seeking to become a Certified Child Life Specialist. The course is taught by a Certified Child Life Specialist and focuses on children in the health care environment. Topics of study include: Child Life documents, scope of practice, impact of illness, injury and health care on patients and families, family-centered care, therapeutic play and preparation. (F,W,S)

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HHS 430     Hlth Behavior & Hlth Education     3 Credit Hours

This course provides an overview of social and behavioral science theories that guide the development of health education and promotion interventions aimed at preventing, reducing, and eliminating public health problems. Part one of the course describes the relationship between behavior and health, through a review of several current health problems faced by people in the United States. Part two presents a survey of health behavior theories ranging from those aimed at individual behavioral change to community health education promotions. The final part of the course looks at the application of theory to real-world health promotion and education interventions. Students will learn how social and behavioral theory informs intervention design, implementation, and evaluation. (F,W,S)

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HHS 433     Race/Ethnic Health     3 Credit Hours

Full Course Title: Race, Ethnicity and Community Health This course provides a broad overview of health disparities in the United States, with a focus on the three types of social inequity-race ethnicity (and nativity status), socioeconomic status (SES), and gender. Epidemiological issues, health behaviors, health care services, and health and social issues specific to various minority populations in the U.S are covered. THe underlying position of the course is that understanding groups that are at higher risk of developing poor health outcomes is crucial to developing better health care and health policy. (OC)

HHS 435     Obesity and the Lifecourse     3 Credit Hours

This course aims to introduce students to the fundamentals of the lifecourse perspective on health, while using ?obesity? as a unifying example to illustrate its theoretical linkages to individual and population health, the practical implications for the administration and financing of the health care system, and for framing policy options. The course highlights the differential impact of obesity on (1) the health and socioeconomic achievement of individuals at various stages in the lifecourse; (2) the population health and economic needs or opportunities, as derived from the lifecourse profile of a specific population (i.e., age distribution and aging trends) and in the context of a changing structure of society; and (3) the demand for healthcare services and other stressors on the healthcare system. The course identifies the rationale, goals, scope, design, and potential for successful implementation of obesity-reducing policy interventions at different points during the lifecourse. (F,W,S)

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HHS 436     Reproductive Health Policy     3 Credit Hours

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of reproductive health in the US. Understanding women's reproductive health requires consideration of the intersections of gender, race, class, culture, geography, economic status, and nation within a sociopathical context. The course introduces students to the historical trends in the regulation of women's fertility and reproductive health. Readings draw from a number of different disciplines, including: law, medical studies, history, social sciences, and personal narratives to critically examine the intent and impact of current standards for reproductive health policy and practice. Topics include: reproductive justice, contraception, pregnancy, reproductive control, and family leave. Course discussions include a focus on health policy and activism to affect change related to women's reproductive health, all within a framework of reproductive justice. A major emphasis is on developing critical thinking skills that can be applied to issues of women's reproductive health in order to educate and empower students to become proactive healthcare consumers. (F,W,S)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201 or ANTH 303 or HUM 303 or SOC 303 or PSYC 303 or WGST 303

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HHS 440     Medical Sociology     3 Credit Hours

An analysis of health and illness behavior from the point of view of the consumer, as well as medical professionals, the structure, strengths and weaknesses of the medical care delivery system in the U.S.; the impact of culture and personality on illness behavior; and a study of the institution of medicine and activities of health care professionals.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HHS 442     Medical Ethics     3 Credit Hours

An examination of moral issues in medicine. Among the problems to be considered are truth-telling and paternalism in the doctor-patient relationship, psychosurgery and behavior control, death and euthanasia, the allocation of scarce resources, and genetic counseling and control. Specific attention will be given to ethical theories and to philosophical concepts such as rights, autonomy, and justice.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 234 or PHIL 240 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304 or PHIL 305 or PHIL 310 or PHIL 315 or PHIL 320 or PHIL 340 or PHIL 350 or PHIL 355 or PHIL 365 or PHIL 369 or PHIL 370 or PHIL 371 or PHIL 375 or PHIL 380 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 441 or PHIL 445 or PHIL 485 or PHIL 490

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HHS 448     Comparative Health Care System     3 Credit Hours

An introduction and overview of the English, Swedish, and People's Republic of China health care systems. Focus on cultural and other organizational characteristics, unique features, approaches, and ability to solve problems. Emphasis on how three systems help us understand the American health care system.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HHS 456     Health Care and the Law     3 Credit Hours

A comprehensive study of legal issues in health care, including regulation of hospitals, consent for treatment, confidentiality, experimentation, family planning, children's rights, access to health care. The emphasis will be on the organizational and personal consequence of legal requirements. Junior/Senior standing is a requirement. Students cannot receive credit for both HHS/HPS 456 and HHS/HPS 556.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 201 or SOC 200 or POL 364

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore

HHS 470     Information Science and Ethics     3 Credit Hours

Technological innovations in how individuals, organizations, and governments collect and share personal information have raised myriad concerns regarding how that information can be best protected. In today's highly networked world, individuals must acquire the knowledge and skills to engage with technologies in a safe and secure manner. This course provides an interdisciplinary exploration of the social, legal, ethical, and design challenges that arise when it comes to securing personal information and helping individuals maintain desired levels of privacy at home, work, and everywhere in between. (YR)

Prerequisite(s): MATH 115 and MATH 116 and (MATH 227 or MATH 217) and (MATH 205 or MATH 215) and CIS 150 and CIS 200 or CCM 200 or IMSE 200

HHS 475     Soc Construct Mental Illness     3 Credit Hours

Full Course Title: Social Construction of Mental Illness This course explores varied cultural descriptions and models of mental illness. By focusing on the ways that culture shapes how people experience, and respond to, mental illness this class explores cultural representations of mental illness, ranging from discrete illness resulting from a chemical imbalance to a profound threat to order. We seek to understand the cultural, personal, and political underpinnings of mental illness and medical practices in societies throughout the world. The course utilizes an interdisciplinary perspective, drawing from multiple sources of information regarding mental health issues including feminism.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or SOC 201 or WGST 303 or ANTH 303 or HUM 303 or SOC 303 or PSYC 303

HHS 480     Arab American Health     3 Credit Hours

This course explores health issues, practices, risk factors, and disease in the Arab world and MENA region, as well as in Arab American communities in the United States and in the State of Michigan. The course focuses on the interaction of culture, geography, and health in the Arab world and the impact of cultural commonalities on the health of the generations of Arab immigrants to the United States. (W)

HHS 490     Topics in Health     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Examination of problems and issues related to Health. Title as listed in Schedule of Classes will change according to specific content. Course may be repeated for credit when specific topics differ.

HHS 490C     Topics in Health     3 Credit Hours

This course provides an overview of health education efforts with women and families, informed by a Maternal and Child Health framework and a life course perspective. Students successfully completing the course will be able to: 1) describe the field of maternal and child health, 2) describe health issues prevalent among both women of childbearing age and children, 3) understand interventions developed to address maternal and child health, and 4) understand how women are engaged in health education efforts targeted to women, children and men. This course will also provide students with means of applying principles in maternal and child health and the life coure perspective in health education practice. This course is appropriate for students in Community Health Education, Public Health, Child Life, and Health Policy Studies.

HHS 491     HHS Senior Seminar     3 Credit Hours

Focus on current issues and practical problems faced by persons working in public health, health care organizations, human services delivery, and financing. Use of the case method (where appropriate) to demonstrate and discuss real problems and approaches in functioning institutions in Southeastern Michigan. Taught primarily from the point of view of individuals responsible for administering or advising such institutions. (F,W,S)

Prerequisite(s): HPS 440 or HHS 440 and (HPS 336 or HHS 336 or HPS 364 or HHS 364 or HPS 390 or HPS 401 or HHS 402 or HPS 403 or HPS 404 or HHS 404 or HPS 405 or HHS 415 or HPS 410 or HHS 410 or HPS 412 or HHS 412 or HPS 430 or HHS 430 or HPS 442 or HHS 442 or HPS 448 or HHS 448 or HPS 456 or HHS 456 or HPS 475 or HHS 475 or HPS 498 or HHS 498)

Restriction(s):
Cannot enroll if Class is Freshman or Sophomore or Junior

HHS 495     Off-Campus Research     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Participation in ongoing research, and/or field experience at an off-campus laboratory, clinical, health, healthcare facility, or field site. Arrangements are made between the site, the student, the pre-health advisor, faculty member, and/or the academic advisor(s). Four to twelve hours laboratory or site experience attendance per week. Permission of advisor required. (F,W,S)

HHS 498     Independent Study     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Readings or analytical assignments in accordance with the needs and interests of those enrolled and agreed upon by the student and instructor, which shall not duplicate a formal course offering. (F,W,S)

HHS 499     Independent Study     1 to 3 Credit Hours

Readings or analytical assignments in accordance with the needs and interests of those enrolled and agreed upon by the student and instructor, which shall not duplicate a formal course offering. (F,W,S)

 

Frequency of Offering

The following abbreviations are used to denote the frequency of offering: (F) fall term; (W) winter term; (S) summer term; (F, W) fall and winter terms; (YR) once a year; (AY) alternating years; (OC) offered occasionally