Student Rights and Responsibilities

Student Records and Student Rights

In carrying out their assigned responsibilities, many offices at the University of Michigan collect and maintain information about students. Although these records belong to the University, both University policy and federal law accord you a number of rights concerning these records. The following is designed to inform you concerning where records about you may be kept and maintained, what kinds of information are in those records, the conditions under which you or anyone else may have access to information in those records, and what action to take if you believe that the information in your record is inaccurate or that your rights have been compromised.

Because the University does not maintain all student records in one location, the following contains general information related to student records. By direction of the Regents, however, each office that maintains student records is required to develop a written statement of its policies and procedures for handling those records. For more information about FERPA, visit the University of Michigan Office of the General Counsel’s web page at: umich.edu/~vpgc/faq_student.html

Student Records Location

If you are in any school or college except Rackham, your dean’s office or your academic advisor has information concerning your academic progress: admissions application, test scores, letters of recommendation, copy of academic record, notes (if any) made by academic counselors, information about honors awarded and/or academic discipline imposed, and similar items.

Only two offices have records on all students. The Office of Enrollment Services/Registration and Records maintains information pertaining to your enrollment (registration) and your official academic record. The Student Accounts Office maintains information about charges assessed and payments made to your account.

The other offices listed at the end of this document will usually have information about you only if you have had dealings with them or utilized their services.

Student Rights

Once you attend, you have the following rights concerning your student records:

1. The right to inspect and review all material in your file(s) except:

  1. Professional mental health treatment records to the extent necessary, in the judgment of the attending physician or professional counselor, to avoid detrimental effects to the mental health of the student or of others. These records may, however, be reviewed by a physician or other appropriate professional of your choice.
  2. Financial information furnished by your parents in support of an application for financial aid.
  3. Confidential letters of recommendation that were placed in your file prior to January 1, 1975.
  4. Confidential letters of recommendation concerning admission, employment, or honorary recognition, for which you have waived access. (The University may not require you to sign a waiver in order to obtain services, but a person writing a recommendation may insist on a waiver as a condition for his or her writing it.)
  5. Personal notes made by a faculty member or counselor that are accessible only to that person and are not shared with others.
  6. Materials in any admissions files, until you have been admitted to, and have attended in the U-M school or college for which the materials were submitted.

Most offices will require you to file a written request if you wish to review your records. Sometimes the response will be immediate, but in most instances you should expect to wait several days; in no case, however, may the response be delayed more than 45 days from the date of your request. Also, once you have submitted such a request, no non-exempt material may be removed from the file in question until the matter is resolved.

Note: Federal law requires that an institution make copies of materials available to a student only if the failure to do so effectively prevents the student from reviewing his or her file (for example, if you were at some distance from the campus and could not readily come to the campus). Most offices at the University, however, will provide copies if you need them. You will probably have to wait several days for the copies and you will be charged not more than fifteen cents per page plus any postage involved. In certain instances, you may be directed to obtain copies from the office responsible for maintaining a particular record. For example, most offices will not copy transcripts (whether from U-M or another institution you have attended) that are in their files; rather, you will be advised to obtain them directly from the Office of Registration & Records here or at your former school.

2.The right to a hearing if you feel that (a) you have been improperly denied access to your records, (b) your records contain information that is inaccurate or misleading, or (c) information from your records has been improperly released to third parties. Each record-keeping office has a procedure for this purpose. The use of that procedure will result in one of the following:

  1. If the head of the office involved agrees with your contention, he or she will see to it that the necessary corrective action is taken.
  2. If the head of the office does not agree with your contention, you may request a hearing by a hearing panel or hearing officer designated by the unit’s procedures.
  3. If the decision of the hearing panel or hearing officer agrees with you, the necessary corrective action will be taken.
  4. If the decision disagrees with you, you have the right to submit an explanatory statement, which must be included as a permanent part of your record.

3. The right, in most instances, to control access to information in your records by persons or agencies outside the University. Within the University, information from your records will be made available to those staff members who demonstrate a legitimate educational interest consistent with their official functions for the University and consistent with normal professional and legal practices.

  1. Except for directory information (see d below), however, persons outside the University - including your parents and/or spouse - will be given information from your records only (1) when you authorize it in writing, or (2) in connection with your application for or receipt of financial aid, or (3) in connection with studies conducted for the purpose of accreditation, development and validation of predictive tests, administration of student aid programs, or improvement of instruction, or (4) when disclosure is required in a health or safety emergency or by federal or state law or by subpoena. If information from your record is subpoenaed, you will be notified as quickly as possible. In addition, the results of a disciplinary hearing conducted by the institution against the alleged perpetrator of a crime of violence will be made available to the alleged victim of that crime.
  2. Each office is required to keep a record of all requests for non-directory information from your records made by persons outside the University, and to make that record available for you to examine.
  3. Federal law requires that the University designate what it regards as directory information and which may, therefore, be released to those outside the University without specific authorization. The law also requires that each currently enrolled student be given the opportunity to direct that items designated as directory information not be released without his or her consent.
  4. The University of Michigan-Dearborn has designated the following items as directory information: (1) name, (2) permanent and local address and telephone, (3) U-M school or college, (4) class level, (5) major field, (6) dates of attendance at the University of Michigan, (7) degree received and date awarded, (8) honors and awards received, (9) participation in recognized activities, (10) previous school(s) attended, and (11) height and weight of members of intercollegiate athletic teams.
  5. You have the right to direct that directory information about you not be released, however, you should carefully consider the consequences of that action before making the decision to do so. Information is not withheld selectively. If you choose to have directory information withheld, it is withheld from everybody who inquires.
  6. If you wish the University not to release those items designated as directory information, you must file a written request to that effect with the Office of Registration & Records not later than ten (10) days from the beginning of the term for which the restriction is to begin. If you elect to have the University not release this information, all items designated as directory information will be withheld.

4. The right to file a complaint to federal officials if you feel that there has been a violation of the rights afforded you under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. The complaint must be submitted in writing within 180 days of the alleged violation to:

Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, D.C. 20202-4605
Telephone 202-260-3887
TDD 800-877-8339

Questions about the policies and procedures of any unit should be directed to the head of that unit. Questions about the University’s "Policies on Student Records" or about the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 should be directed to:

Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Management & Student Life
1060 Administration Building
Telephone 313-593-5151

Student Records Locations

Academic Support and Outreach Services2136 UC
Admissions1145 UC
Alumni Society1040 AB
Athletics205 FH
Career Services2149 UC
College of Arts Science ans Letters1039 CB
College of BusinessFCS
College of Education, Health and Human Services262 FCS
College of Engineering and Computer Science2070 EC
Counseling and Support Services2157 UC
Enrollment Management and Student Life1060 AB
Financial Aid1183 UC
Honors Program3018 CB
Human Resources1020 AB
Library1157 ML
ParkingCSS
Registration, Records and Student Certification1169 UC
Safety and SecurityCSS
Student Accounts1187 UC

Student Rights & Code of Conduct

A. Introduction

When students choose to accept admission to the University of Michigan-Dearborn (“the University”), they accept the rights and responsibilities of membership in the University’s academic and social community.

The primary purpose of the Statement of Student Rights and Code of Student Conduct (“the Code”) is to assist the University in providing an environment which supports the educational process and the well-being of the campus community. The responsibility for maintaining such an environment is shared by all members of the campus community. The Code was written by students, faculty, and staff of the University of Michigan-Dearborn.

Free inquiry and free expression are essential attributes of the University community. As members of the community, students are encouraged to develop the capacity for critical judgment and to engage in a substantial independent search for truth. The freedom to learn depends upon the opportunities and conditions in the classroom, the campus, and in the larger community. The responsibility to secure and respect general conditions conducive to the freedom to learn should be shared by all members of the academic community.

As members of the University community, students are expected to uphold its values by maintaining a high standard of conduct. Such values include, but are not limited to, civility, dignity, diversity, education, equality, freedom, honesty, and safety. The Code is an articulation of the University's commitment to recognize and support the rights of its students and to provide a guide for defining behaviors the University considers inappropriate. It is not, however, meant to be an exhaustive list of all rights supported by the University or of all actions which may be considered misconduct. The Code defines student rights and conduct standards in order to give general notice of conduct expectations, to identify sanctions that will be imposed when misconduct occurs, and to ensure that students are treated with fundamental fairness and personal dignity.

Disciplinary proceedings initiated in response to a charge of violation will be the responsibility of the Code Process and will be undertaken according to the provisions and procedures articulated by the Code. The focus of inquiry in disciplinary proceedings will be on the question of responsibility of those charged with violating the Code.

Members of the University community are accountable to both civil authorities and to the University for acts which violate the law and this Code. Disciplinary action at the University will, normally, proceed during the pendency of external civil or criminal proceedings and will not be subject to challenge on the grounds that external civil or criminal charges involving the same incident are pending or have been invoked, dismissed, or reduced.

Within the University, entities (such as schools and colleges, business units and student organizations) have developed policies that outline standards of conduct governing their constituents and that sometimes provide procedures for
sanctioning violations of those standards. This Code does not replace those standards; nor does it constrain the procedures or sanctions provided by those policies. The Code will be used to address violations of other University policies when the violation warrants a process or sanction beyond what is available in those policies. In such cases, the policy administrator may take intermediate action regarding a violation of their individual policy; however, final resolution will occur under the procedures outlined in this Code.

Nothing in this document should be construed so as to limit the Chancellor’s authority to maintain health, diligence, and order among students under Regents’ Bylaw 2.02.

B. Academic Rights

  1. Protection of Freedom of Expression. Students are responsible for learning thoroughly the content of any course of study, but are free to take exception to the data or views presented and to reserve judgment about matters of opinion.
  2. Protection Against Improper Disclosure. Protection against improper disclosure of information regarding student views, beliefs, and political associations which instructors acquire in the course of their work as instructors, advisors, and counselors is considered a professional obligation.
  3. Protection Against Improper Academic Evaluation. Students can expect protection, through orderly procedures, against prejudice, arbitrary or capricious evaluation. Students are also expected to respect the academic freedom of faculty and their rights and responsibilities to determine curriculum and evaluate academic performance.
  4. Academic Policies. If any student has a grievance regarding academic practices and policies, there are established procedures within each college and school of the University for resolving such problems. See the appropriate school or college section of the Catalog for a statement of the academic grievance procedure to be followed.
  5. For conflicts involving a faculty or staff member, students are encouraged to try to resolve the matter through consultation with that individual. If the conflict relates to unlawful discrimination or harassment, the student should consult with the Office of Institutional Equity. Formal complaints must be filed with the Office of Institutional Equity.

C. Student Rights

Students at the University have the same rights and protections under the Constitutions of the United States and the State of Michigan as other citizens. These rights include freedom of expression, press, religion, and assembly. Higher education has a long tradition of student activism and values freedom of expression, which includes voicing unpopular views and dissent. As members of our University community, students have the right to express their own views, but must also take responsibility for granting the same right to others.

Students have the right to be treated fairly and with dignity regardless of race, color, national origin, age, marital status, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, disability, religion, height, weight, or veteran status, and as revised in the University of Michigan Nondiscrimination Policy. The University has a long-standing tradition of commitment to pluralistic education. Accordingly, the University, through this Code, will not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of protected group status.

Students have the right to be protected from capricious decision-making by the University and to have access to University policies which affect them. The University has an enduring commitment to provide students with a balanced and fair system of dispute resolution. Accordingly, this Code will not deprive students of the appropriate due process protections to which they are entitled. This Code is one of the University’s administrative procedures and should not be equated with procedures used in civil or criminal courts.

Students and student organizations are free to discuss questions of interest to them and to express opinions publicly and privately without penalty. In conveying the ideas and opinions of students, the student press is free from censorship and the need of advance approval.

Editors, managers, and writers must subscribe to the standards of responsible journalism. At the same time, they are protected from arbitrary suspension and removal because of student, faculty, administrative, or public disapproval of editorial policy or content. Students have the right to privacy of personal possessions. Searches and seizures may be conducted by appropriate University officials, but only for specific reasons of probable cause and not freely at will. The student(s) being searched must be notified of the object of the search, unless there is immediate danger to person or property.

D. Student Conduct

Along with rights come certain responsibilities. Students are expected to conduct themselves in a manner conducive to an environment of academic integrity and of respect for the educational process and the safety and well-being of all members of the campus community. Students are also expected to comply with published University policies.

Non-Academic Code of Conduct

The following behaviors, for example contradict the behavioral standards of the University community and are subject to disciplinary action under this Code. The prohibited conduct listed below should be used as a guide rather than viewed as an exhaustive list of all behaviors that the University considers misconduct and subject to disciplinary action.

  1. Causing or threatening to cause physical harm to another person, including acts such as killing, assaulting or battering.
  2. Perpetrating intimate partner violence.
  3. Sexual misconduct as defined in the University’s Student Sexual Misconduct Policy.
  4. Stalking
  5. Discrimination or harassment in violation of the University’s Nondiscrimination and harassment policy.
  6. Hazing.
  7. Disrupting University business operations or University sponsored activities. This includes but is not limited to studying, teaching, research, University administration, or campus safety, fire, police, or emergency services (except for behavior that is protected by the University’s policy on Freedom of Speech and Artistic Expression).
  8. Interfering with the freedom of expression or rights of individuals on University premises or at University sponsored activities.
  9. Furnishing false information to the University.
  10. Failing to comply with directions of University officials, including campus safety, acting in performance of their duties.
  11. Initiating or causing to be initiated any false report, warning, or threat of fire, explosion, or other emergency on University premises or at University sponsored activities.
  12. Theft of University property or funds; possession of stolen University property; theft or possession of stolen property on University premises.
  13. Destroying, defacing, damaging, or misusing any University funds, equipment, materials, services or property or the funds, equipment, materials, services or property of others.
  14. Possessing, using, or storing firearms, explosives, or weapons on University-controlled property or at University events or programs (unless approved by the Department of Public Safety; such approval will be given only in extraordinary circumstances)
  15. Tampering with fire or other safety equipment or setting unauthorized fires.
  16. Illegally possessing or using alcohol; illegally distributing, manufacturing, or selling alcohol; illegally possessing or using drugs; or illegally distributing, manufacturing or selling drugs.
  17. Commission of any crime on University premises or at University sponsored activities.
  18. Lack of compliance with the procedures outlined in the Code; including, but not limited to, filing a false claim, retaliating against or intimidating individuals who participate in the Code process; failure to comply with the terms of an informal or formal resolution; or violating the terms of any sanctions imposed in accordance with the Code.
  19. Assuming another person’s identity or role through deception or without proper authorization. Communicating or acting under the guise, name, identification, email address, signature, or indicia of another person without proper authorization, or communicating under the rubric of an organization, entity, or unit that you do not have the authority to represent.
  20. Smoking on University property.
  21. Conviction, a plea of no contest, acceptance of responsibility or acceptance of sanctions for a crime or civil infraction (other than a minor traffic offense) in state or federal court if the underlying behavior impacts the University community.
  22. Violating University computer policies.
  23. Promoting, wagering, receiving monies for wagering, or gambling for money or property in any form on University premises or University-sponsored activities that is in violation of applicable laws.
  24. Violations of any published University policies.
  25. Attempt to commit any act prohibited by Section D of this Code.

E. Scope of Violations

Behavior that occurs in the city of Dearborn, on Universitycontrolled property, or at University sponsored events/programs may violate the Code. Behavior that occurs outside the city of Dearborn, outside of University-controlled property, or apart from University sponsored events/programs may violate the Code only if the behavior poses an obvious and serious threat of harm to any member (s) of the University community.

Violations of the Code that occur in cyberspace or other forums may be sanctioned under this Code. The Code references a few specific University policies. Students, however, are responsible for complying with all published University policies. The Code will be used to address violations of other University policies when the violation warrants a process or sanction beyond what is available in those policies. In such cases, the policy administrator may take intermediate action regarding a violation of their individual policy; however, final resolution will occur under the procedures outlined in this Code. Jurisdiction over individual students charged with violating the Code is limited to persons admitted to, or registered at, or eligible to enroll in the University on a full or part-time basis at the time of the alleged violation. The discontinuance of enrollment does not negate the jurisdiction of the Code which applies to all matters that arose while a person was a student.

F. Resolution Process

Section 1. Purpose

The University provides a uniform, fair and impartial process for reporting, adjudicating and resolving alleged violations of the Code. The responsibility for administering the Code rests with the Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Management and Student Life (“VC EMSL”) who may delegate certain administrative responsibilities. The resolution and appeal processes outlined herein are administrative functions and are not subject to the same rules of civil or criminal proceedings. Because some violations of these standards are also violations of law, students may be accountable to both the legal system and the University.

Section 2. Initiating the Resolution Process

Any University student, faculty member, or staff member may submit a complaint alleging a violation of the Code. A student, faculty member, or staff member may also submit a complaint based upon information reported to that person. All complaints must be submitted to the Student Conduct Advisor in writing, within 180 calendar days after the incident(s) alleged in the complaint. The VC EMSL may waive the limitation period when a late submission is reasonable. If the Student Conduct Advisor determines, based on an initial review, that the alleged behavior may be a violation of the Code, the Student Conduct Advisor will notify the respondent in writing and schedule a meeting to describe the resolution process. If the Student Conduct Advisor determines, based on the initial review of the complaint, that the alleged behavior is not a violation of the Code or that the matter would be better handled through another process or office, the Student Conduct Advisor will notify the complainant in writing that matter will not proceed pursuant to the Code process.

Section 3. Procedures for Handling Discrimination and Unlawful Harassment Complaints

When a student is accused of engaging in unlawful discrimination or harassment including, but not limited to sexual misconduct in violation of the University’s Student Sexual Misconduct Policy, the following procedures will apply. First, the Student Conduct Advisor will refer the matter to the Office of Institutional Equity for review and investigation, if necessary. Next, the Office of Institutional Equity will conduct all investigations in consultation with the Student Conduct Advisor. If a student is found responsible for engaging in unlawful discrimination or harassment, the matter will be referred to the Student Conduct Advisor for sanctioning. The complainant or the responsible student then has the option to file an appeal of the sanction only consistent with the procedures outlined in Section F5-Appeals and the grounds for review outlined in the Student Sexual Misconduct Policy.

Section 4. Resolution Process

The Student Conduct Advisor will meet with the respondent to explain the complaint and the resolution process. The students may be accompanied by an advisor. The student will have the opportunity to ask questions and make a statement. The Student Conduct Advisor will inform the respondent (1) that statements the student makes to the Student Conduct Advisor may be considered at any hearing, (2) that the student does not have to make a statement at the initial meeting, (3) that all disciplinary records are confidential to the extent permitted by law, and (4) that the student has a right to know the potential sanctions before admitting responsibility (but may not appeal if he accepts responsibility without asking about sanctions). The respondent has a choice of informal or formal dispute resolution, as described herein. Both parties may choose to avoid the Code process and engage in alternative conflict resolution methods that may include mediation or facilitated dialogue, for example.

A. Informal Resolution Process

The respondent has the option of accepting responsibility for the charges and accepting the sanction chosen by the Student Conduct Advisor. Upon request, the respondent has the right to know the potential sanctions before accepting responsibility; however the respondent may not appeal if he accepts responsibility without asking about sanctions. The respondent also has the option of accepting responsibility for the charges and requesting a hearing on the sanctions under the procedures outlined in Section 3FB. The respondent may not appeal an informal resolution.

B. Formal Resolution Process

Standard of Proof. The standard of proof is the preponderance of the evidence standard. This standard requires that the information supporting each finding be more convincing than the information offered in opposition to it. Under this standard, individuals are presumed not to have engaged in the conducted report unless a preponderance of the evidence supports a finding of responsibility If the matter cannot be appropriately or satisfactorily resolved through informal resolution, it will be referred for a hearing. The Student Conduct Advisor will refer the matter to the Hearing Board chair within fifteen (15) University business days after initiated by either party. The Student Conduct Advisor will be in charge of preparing and submitting information submitted by the parties to the Hearing Board Chair. The procedures for conducting a formal hearing are outlined in Appendix B.

Section 5. Appeals

An appeals process is an essential safeguard for an imperfect human process that makes every effort to be fair. The complainant and the respondent may appeal a decision of the Hearing Board to the Provost who will convene and chair the Code of Appeals Board. An appeal must be submitted in writing to the Provost’s Office within ten (10) University business days from the date of receipt of the letters notifying the respondent and the complainant of the final decision of the Hearing Board. Failure to appeal within the allotted time will render the original decision final and conclusive. Appeals will be decided upon the record of the original hearing and upon the written statements on appeal submitted by the parties, the Hearing Board Chair and/or the Student Conduct Advisor. Grounds for appeal are limited to one or more of the following reasons: 1. There is a material deviation from the procedures affected the outcome of the case; or 2. There is new and relevant information that was unavailable at the time of the investigation and resolution that could reasonably affect the matter of the outcome; or 3. The sanctions are not appropriate and proportionate to the determined violation(s); or 4. The evidence clearly does not support the finding(s). The Code Appeals Board may take one of the following actions: confirm the decision made through the hearing process, alter the sanction(s), or recommend a rehearing. The decision of The Code Appeals Board is final. The imposition of sanctions may be deferred during the pendency of an appeal proceeding at the sole discretion of the VC ESML.

G. Sanctions

The sanctions to be imposed should be commensurate with the offending conduct. Because education may be the most effective and appropriate means of addressing behavior that violates the standards of a university community, the University encourages fashioning sanctions to include an educational element which may help students understand their behavior in the context of the academic community. Although it is inappropriate for the University to try to change a student's convictions, it is appropriate for the University to ask a student to change behavior.

Regrettably, some conduct is so harmful to members of the University community or deleterious to the educational process that more severe sanctions may be required.

The sanctions imposed under these standards do not diminish or replace the penalties which may be invoked under generally applicable civil or criminal laws. Students are reminded that many violations of the standards, including harassment and other discriminatory behavior, may violate various local, State and federal laws and, therefore, also be subject to legal action.

A combination of the sanctions described below may be imposed. The range of potential sanctions is as follows:

  1. Suspension from Specific Course or Activity. The student is removed from a specific course or activity.
  2. Class/Workshop Attendance. The student enrolls in and completes a class that may help improve the student’s understanding of why the conduct engaged in is inappropriate.
  3. Community Service. The student performs an appropriate amount of service that is both beneficial to the community and likely to assist the student in understanding the harm caused by the student’s misconduct.
  4. Restitution. Compensation for loss, damage, or injury to the appropriate party or to the University in the form of service, money or material replacement.
  5. Restriction from Employment at the University. Prohibition or limitation on University employment.
  6. Educational Project. Completion of a project specifically designed to help the student understand why the student’s behavior was inappropriate.
  7. No contact. A directive not to have any contact with a particular person, office or activity.
  8. Disciplinary Reprimand. The student receives a formal reprimand for violating the standards of behavior and a warning that future violations may result in more severe disciplinary action. The student, however, does not lose University privileges.
  9. Disciplinary Probation. A designated period of time during which the student is not in good standing with the University. The terms of probation may involve restrictions on student privileges, such as engaging in any extracurricular activity, running for or holding office in any student group or organization, serving on any University committees or participation on varsity or club sports. The terms of probation may also involve specific behavioral expectations. The appropriate University units will be notified of the student's probationary status.
  10. Suspension in Abeyance. A designated period of time during which the student is not in good standing with the University and is subject to automatic suspension. The student remains enrolled; however, any violation of the Code or other conditions of the suspension, during the period of Suspension in Abeyance will, after a determination of responsibility, result in automatic suspension.
  11. Suspension. The student is temporarily separated from the University for a specified period of time. Conditions may be stipulated for the readmission of a student. When a student is suspended during a term, the student is still responsible for payment of tuition and fees for that term.
  12. Academic Dismissal. The student is permanently dismissed from a school or college of the University.
  13. Expulsion in Abeyance. A designated period of time during which the student is not in good standing with the University and is subject to automatic expulsion. The student remains in enrolled; however, any violation of the Code or other conditions of the expulsion in abeyance, during the Expulsion in Abeyance, will, after a determination of responsibility, result in automatic expulsion.
  14. Expulsion. The student is permanently separated from the University. This penalty may also include the student being barred from University premises and activities. When a student is expelled during a term the student is still responsible for payment of tuition and fees for that term.
  15. Other Disciplinary Actions. In addition to or in place of any of the above sanctions, the student may be subject to other penalties commensurate with the offending conduct. This may include but is not limited to degree and/or transcript actions, such as rescission of a degree, withholding of course credit, loss of credit for an assignment/ exam, assignment of additional work, loss of special privileges, behavioral intervention, or a behavioral contract.

H. Interim Suspension or Specified Restrictions

The Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Management and Student Life or a designee may suspend a student for an interim period pending disciplinary proceedings. Interim suspensions are effective immediately without prior notice, whenever there is evidence that (1) the continued presence of the student on the University campus poses a substantial threat to the student or to others; or (2) the continued presence of the student on the University campus poses a substantial threat to the stability and continuance of normal University function. Within two University business days after being suspended on an interim basis, the student is entitled to a meeting with the VC EMSL to be informed of the nature of the alleged violation, to be presented with available evidence and to be given an opportunity to make a statement and present evidence. If the interim suspension is continued, the student will be offered a formal hearing within five (5) University business days. The Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Management and Student Life or a designee may appoint an ad hoc hearing board to hear the case, if necessary. The Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Management and Student Life or a designee may institute specific restrictions on the student during the period of interim suspension.

I. Related Procedures

Section 1. Clemency

The Chancellor of the University has the power of executive clemency.

Section 2. Time Limits

For good cause, any time limit in these procedures may be extended by the Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Management and Student Life (VC EMSL).

Section 3. Procedural And Interpretive Questions

All procedural and interpretive questions concerning the Code will be resolved by the Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Management and Student Life (VC EMSL) or a designee. At any time, the VC EMSL, Student Conduct Advisor and Hearing Board Chair may consult the Office of General Counsel about a case or procedures.

Section 4. Records Of Resolution Actions

Records will be maintained by the VC EMSL or designee with regard to all actions taken under the Code. Accordingly, records will be maintained of complaints, hearings, findings, and sanctions. For each case in which a complaint is issued, including cases where the student accepts responsibility, the record will recite the facts of all conduct found or admitted to be in violation of the Code with sufficient specificity to indicate that a violation of the Code occurred. Confidentiality of records will be maintained to the extent permitted by law and the University of Michigan-Dearborn Student Rights and Records Policy. If a student is suspended or expelled, a notation will be made on the student’s official academic record. The notation of suspension will be removed at the time the student is readmitted to the University.

Section 5. Official Transcripts

The Student Conduct Advisor may place a hold on a student’s transcript that will prevent the student from receiving an official transcript or registering for future terms, if the student fails to participate in or comply with the sanctions issued through the Code process.

Section 6. Student Access To Records

Records and documents that will be considered during a hearing will be made available in advance to all parties but may be redacted to protect the privacy rights of individuals not directly involved in the resolution process.

Section 7. Reports Of Actions

Statistical reports of actions taken through the Code will be published annually. These data will cover the number of complaints and the types of violations, resolutions, and sanctions.

Section 8. Concurrent Legal And Code Proceedings

To ensure the educational potential of the process and in fairness to a complainant, the University should provide a prompt response to behavior which goes against the values of the University as defined by the Code. In the interest of fairness to a respondent, however, a student undergoing civil or criminal action for the same behavior, which forms the basis of a complaint under this Code, may request a reasonable delay of the Code resolution process until external proceedings are resolved. In determining whether a request is reasonable, the Student Conduct Advisor will evaluate the unique circumstances of the case, including the length of the delay and the impact of delay on the complainant and community, in addition to protecting the integrity of the resolution process. In granting a request for a delay, Student Conduct Advisor may implement conditions on continued enrollment, as appropriate. If a respondent’s request for delay is denied and the student does want to proceed with the Code resolution process, the student may withdraw from enrollment and may not re-enroll until authorized by the VC EMSL or his/her designee.

Section 9. Amendment Process

The Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Management and Student Life is responsible for administering and updating the Code. The VC EMSL may make amendments as necessary but will facilitate a full campus review of the Code at least every five (5) years.

Appendix A. Definition of Roles

Student Conduct Advisor. The role of the Student Conduct Advisor is to provide guidance regarding the Code and its procedures. The Student Conduct Advisor is responsible for the following: monitoring the structure and process of Hearing Boards; providing training for Hearing Board Members; determining the appropriate venue for any cases in which the type(s) of violation(s) are not clearly or solely either nonacademic or academic misconduct, or in which the academic misconduct may fall within the purview of more than one academic unit; and maintaining all reports of all case resolutions, providing relevant sanction information to the appropriate Dean and/or administrator(s), and producing an annual, statistical summary of all informal and formal adjudication actions.

Hearing Board Chair. The role of the Hearing Board Chair is to managing the formal hearing process. The Hearing Board chair is responsible for the following: scheduling hearings; receiving and providing all relevant documents to hearing board members, and parties, conducting hearings; and drafting the final report. The Hearing Board Chair is a non-voting member of the Hearing Board but may vote only in the case of a tie. Hearing Board Chairs are appointed on an annual basis by the VC EMSL. The VC EMSL may revoke or extend appointments.

Hearing Board. The role of the Hearing Board is to determine whether a student is responsible for a violation of the Code. The Hearing Boards consist of four (4) members who are appointed on an annual basis by the VC EMSL. The Hearing Board consists of one faculty member, one staff member and two students. The VC EMSL will appoint a pool of panelists on an annual basis. The VC EMSL may revoke or extend appointments. At least one-half of the members of the Hearing Board must be students currently enrolled at the University of Michigan-Dearborn.

Appeals Board. The role of the Appeals Board is to review all appeals submitted. The Appeals Board is chaired by the Provost or the Provost’s designee. The Appeals Board is comprised of five voting members: two students, two faculty, and one staff. A quorum shall consist of four voting members with the Chair voting only to resolve a tie-vote by the members.

Student Board members are appointed by the VC ESML, in consultation with Student Government, for one year terms. Appointees need not be members of Student Government but must be enrolled as students. To be eligible for Board membership, the student must be in good academic standing, and be under no current restrictions as a result of Code violation.

Faculty Board members are appointed by the Faculty Senate for staggered three year Appointees need not be members of the Faculty Senate, but they must hold tenured positions as associate or full professors. The Staff Board member is appointed by the Staff Senate for a three year term. The appointee need not be a member of the Staff Senate but must be a permanent employee in a staff position.

Appendix B. Formal Hearing Procedures

The following procedures will apply to formal hearings:

  1. In cases that involve more than one respondent, the students will have the option of choosing whether they have a joint or separate hearing. If the students cannot agree, the hearings will be separate.
  2. The Hearing Board chair will provide the parties at least five (5) University business days advance notice of the hearing. The hearing should take place no later than twenty (20) University business days after referral from the Student Conduct Advisor.
  3. If any party fails to appear after proper notice, the hearing may proceed and findings may be made. In addition, sanctions may be imposed without the respondent’s participation.
  4. The Hearing Board Chair may request the appearance of University faculty, staff or student upon his/her initiative, or upon the request of any Board member or the respondent, or the complainant. University students and employees are required to comply with requests to appear as witnesses.
  5. Both parties may have access to all written or other information that will be considered by the Hearing Board before the hearing. Both parties have the right to the names of witnesses who will testify at the hearing before the hearing.
  6. Each party may be accompanied at the hearing by a personal advisor, who may be an attorney; however, the advisor may not participate directly in the proceedings. For example, the advisor may not question witnesses or make presentations.
  7. The respondent, complainant, and Student Conduct Advisor may also present written statements to the Hearing Board. The respondent and complainant may make statements at the beginning and end of the hearing.
  8. During the hearing, the Student Conduct Advisor, the respondent, the complainant and the Hearing Board members have the right to question all participants giving testimony.
  9. The Hearing Board Chair shall exercise control over the hearing to avoid needless consumption of time and to prevent the harassment or intimidation of witnesses. Unduly repetitious or irrelevant evidence may be excluded.
  10. Formal rules of evidence do not apply. The Hearing Board Chair may, at his/her discretion, admit all matters into evidence that reasonable persons would accept as having probative value in the conducting a fair hearing.
  11. Any person who disrupts a hearing or who fails to adhere to rulings of the Hearing Board Chair may be immediately removed from the proceedings. If he/she continues to be disruptive, the Hearing Board Chair has the right to remove that person for the duration of the hearing and to continue and conclude the hearing.
  12. Witnesses will be asked to affirm that their testimony is truthful. They may be subject to sanctions by the Board with respect to charges of intentionally furnishing false information to the University. Witnesses may be present in the hearing room only when they are presenting information.
  13. Respondents have the right to remain silent during the hearing. Silence by the accused will not be used as evidence of responsibility for a charge.
  14. To ensure the privacy of the parties and to maximize the educational potential of the process, both parties must agree to the admission of any other people (except witnesses or advisors) to the hearing.
  15. The ensure fairness and consistency, and to maximize the educational potential of the process, panelists may have access to details, rationales, and results of past cases.
  16. A recording will be made of hearings, and will be made available to the complainant or respondent upon request during the period in which an appeal may be filed or is pending.
  17. After completion of the hearing, the Board will meet privately to determine responsibility and sanctions, by a majority of the Hearing Board Members. The Hearing Board Chair may vote in the case of a tie. A respondent is presumed not responsible unless the preponderance of all the information presented indicates that a violation of the Code has occurred.
  18. In all cases, the Hearing Board Chair will issue a written decision containing findings of fact, conclusions as to responsibility, and rationales for all sanctions imposed, within ten (10) business days after the completion of the hearing to the parties, the Student Conduct Advisor, the Dean of the college/school in which the respondent is enrolled, the VC EMSL.
  19. Student Conduct Advisor is responsible for monitoring compliance with all sanctions and informal resolution agreements.

Academic Code of Conduct

I.    General Principles

The Academic Code of Conduct (ACC) for the University of Michigan-Dearborn is based on the premise that students will perform honestly and ethically on all tests, projects, and assignments. Students are expected to conduct themselves in a manner conducive to an environment of academic integrity and of respect for the educational process. Therefore, an individual should realize that deception for the purpose of individual gain is an offense against the members of the community.

To ensure that the ACC functions properly, all UM-Dearborn faculty should include in their syllabus the following statement:

“The University of Michigan-Dearborn values academic honesty and integrity. Each student has a responsibility to understand, accept, and comply with the University's standards of academic conduct as set forth by the Code of Academic Conduct, as well as policies established by the schools and colleges. Cheating, collusion, misconduct, fabrication, and plagiarism are considered serious offenses. Violations will not be tolerated and may result in penalties up to and including expulsion from the University.” (Failure of faculty to include the statement does not absolve students from adherence to the ACC.)

All students and faculty members are required to familiarize themselves with the ACC, its implications and effects. Unfamiliarity with the ACC could result in ineffective enforcement or the violation of student rights. It is recommended that department chairs and program directors discuss the ACC with their instructional faculty at periodic intervals.

Any violation of the ACC by students will be dealt with in accordance with the procedures described below.

II.    Prohibited Academic Conduct

The actions cited as prohibited conduct should be used as a guide rather than an exhaustive list of behaviors that the University considers misconduct and subject to disciplinary action.

  1. Plagiarism: includes representing the words, ideas, or work of others as one’s own in writing or presentations, and failing to give full and proper credit to the original source. Failing to properly acknowledge and cite language from another source, including paraphrased text. Failing to properly cite any ideas, images, technical work, creative content, or other material taken from published or unpublished sources in any medium, including online material or oral presentations, and including the author’s own previous work.
  2. Cheating: includes Copying from another’s exam or other evaluative assignment. Using notes, books, digital devices or resources, or other materials for an exam or other evaluative assignment without explicit permission of the instructor. Submitting work that was previously used for another class without the informed permission of the instructor. Discussing or sharing information about questions or answers on an exam or other evaluative assignment without explicit permission of the instructor. Giving, taking, or receiving a copy of an exam without explicit permission of the instructor. Allowing another person to take an exam or complete an assignment for the student. Attempting to change the result of an exam or
    other evaluation.
  3. Fabrication: includes alterations to transcripts, grades, letters of recommendation, or other evaluations by or for any current or former student.
  4. Aiding and Abetting Dishonesty: altering documents affecting academic records; aiding others to commit any act prohibited by the ACC; forging a signature of authorization or falsifying information on an official academic document, election form, grade report, letter of permission, petition, or any document designed to meet or exempt a student from an established University or unit academic regulation.
  5. Interference: obstructing or hindering the work or study of a member of the faculty, or staff, or a student at the University.

III.    Disciplinary Actions

Faculty members have the authority to impose penalties with respect to her or his class. These penalties include, but are not limited to, reducing a student’s course grade or failing a student in the course(s).

For first time offender cases that are appealed, the Academic Integrity Board shall have the authority to sustain or overturn the faculty member’s determination of an ACC violation. For repeat offenders, the Board shall make a recommendation to the dean calling for one or more of the sanctions provided in section G of the Code of Conduct.

IV.    Reporting a Violation

Alleging a prohibited academic conduct is the responsibility of the faculty member. It is recommended that the faculty member make every attempt to resolve the case promptly between him/herself and the student. The student has the right to appeal a faculty member’s allegation and/or sanctions to the Academic Integrity Board.

When a faculty member believes a student has violated the University’s ACC, s/he will communicate with the student in order to discuss the case in detail. The faculty member shall inform the student of the nature of the ACC charges; explain the sanctions imposed as a result of the charges; provide the student a copy of the Academic Code of Conduct Violation Report; and provide him/her an opportunity to refute the allegations. The instructor should also inform the student of the following: 1) s/he has the right to appeal through the Academic Integrity Board within fifteen (15) academic calendar days (Includes only the Fall and Winter semesters, excluding weekends and University recognized holidays.) of receiving the notification letter (The charging unit’s associate dean shall send the notification letter with a guaranteed delivery receipt.) from the charging unit’s associate dean, and 2) that the case will be reported to the College’s associate dean designated with monitoring for repeat offenses.

After meeting with the student (or arranging for an alternative communication if the meeting is not feasible, such as in the case of an online class or when the student avoids/does not respond to a faculty member’s request for a meeting), the faculty member shall submit to his/her dean’s office and to his/her department chair a copy of the Academic Code of Conduct Violation Report (hereafter Violation Report), including supporting documents if necessary, within three (3) academic calendar days. The associate dean responsible for ACC violations shall send a letter to the student within three (3) academic calendar days of receiving the Violations Report with the following information: 1) confirmation that the allegation and the sanction from the instructor is a matter of record; 2) clarification of the appeal process through the Academic Integrity Board; 3) notification that the record of the incident is in a confidential University academic integrity database, and 4) explanation of the services and support provided by the Ombuds Services Office in Enrollment Management & Student Life in relation to ACC violations.

The associate dean of the charging unit shall ensure that all ACC violations received shall be entered into the University database and s/he shall conduct a search of the database for prior ACC violations by the student. If the student has a prior ACC violation then a hearing of the Academic Integrity Board shall be automatically convened.

V.    Academic Integrity Board Jurisdiction, Composition, and Conflict of Interest

Each college shall create its own Academic Integrity Board which shall be a permanent standing committee of the college and have jurisdiction over alleged violations of the ACC. The Board shall consist of three (3) full-time tenured faculty members of the college serving two-year terms and two (2) nonvoting students of the college serving one-year terms assisted by the Ombuds Services Office director or designee as an exofficio, non-voting, advisory member. The faculty members shall be appointed by the college’s executive committee and the Student Government President shall select the student members who shall have no record or pending accusations of academic; violations. A chair of the Board – chosen from its members – shall function as the administrative head.

Members of the Board shall disqualify themselves from hearing a case if they believe their capacity for making an objective judgment in the case is or may reasonably appear to be impaired. Members should not disqualify themselves for any other reason. Replacements for disqualified members shall be selected in the manner described in paragraph one of section V.

VI.    Academic Integrity Board Procedures

  1. A hearing of the Academic Integrity Board shall be called by the associate dean if a student: 1) contests the accusation(s) against her/him within fifteen (15) academic calendar days of receiving the letter from the charging unit’s associate dean, or 2) has an existing ACC violation on record. A student shall initiate an appeal by completing and submitting to the charging unit’s associate dean a copy of the Academic Appeal Form. If a student decides to appeal there shall be no risk of an additional sanction or penalty being imposed.
  2. Within fifteen (15) academic calendar days after referral, the Board shall meet to discuss the case. The Board shall take no longer than ten (10) academic calendar days after its initial meeting to make its decision/recommendation and convey the information to the appropriate parties.
  3. The Board’s decision/recommendation shall be based on a preponderance of the evidence standard of proof. (A “preponderance of the evidence” shall mean evidence which is of greater weight or more convincing than evidence to the contrary; evidence which shows that something more likely than not is true.)
  4. The Board shall examine and evaluate all documents within the files submitted. The Board has the authority, but is under no obligation, to meet with the instructor and student. If the Board meets with one party they shall provide the opposing side an opportunity to appear. Either party may call for the appearance of no more than three witnesses. University students, faculty, and employees are required to comply with the requests to appear as witnesses. For all other matters the Board shall promulgate its own policies.
  5. For first-time offender cases, the Board shall have the authority to sustain or overturn a faculty member’s accusation and sanction of an ACC violation. Upon making its decision the Board’s chair shall inform in writing the associate dean who shall in turn notify the student and faculty member. If the Board overturns a faculty member’s decision then all records of the ACC violation shall be removed from the University academic integrity database.
  6. For repeat offenders, the Board shall first meet and make a determination of a violation. (The Board members shall not be told of the student’s potential repeat-offender status. Only after the Board finds the student in fault shall the associate dean inform its members and schedule the penalty-phase hearing.) If the student is found to have violated the ACC then the Board will reconvene to decide the proper penalty. Before the second hearing the student and faculty member may submit evidence or a statement concerning the appropriate sanctions to be imposed.
        Factors that may be considered in determining the nature of sanctions to be imposed include: 1) the intent of the student; 2) the effect of the conduct on the University community; 3) past disciplinary record of the student; and 4) any mitigating factors presented by the complainant (i.e., stress, personal illness, illness/death of family members,cultural misunderstandings, etc.). Upon reviewing the submitted materials the Board shall make a recommendation to the dean calling for one or more of the sanctions provided in section G of the Code of Conduct (included at the end of this document). The Board’s chair shall notify the dean of the recommendation.
  7. When a student presents details that would suggest that the challenged action stemmed from conduct violating a nonacademic policy, such as sexual harassment and other forms of discrimination, then no further action will be taken pending the completion of the Office of Institutional Equity proceedings.

VII.    Final Decision

For repeat offender cases the dean shall make the final decision within ten (10) academic calendar days of the Board issuing its recommendation(s). The dean will decide the case on the basis of the records of the proceedings of the Academic Integrity Board, the written materials submitted by the student, and the results of his or her consultation with the parties, if any.

The dean’s decision shall be written and contain the dean’s finding of fact and may (at the discretion of the author) include reasons for the decision. It shall be provided to the student, the student's dean (if applicable), the department chair/program head, the faculty member, and the chair of the Academic Integrity Board, and placed in the student's file.

If the student is from another unit then the charging college’s dean along with the student’s home-unit dean shall review the records and other materials together and issue a joint-decision. If the two deans cannot come to an agreement then the Provost shall make the final decision according to the procedures laid out in paragraphs one and two of section VII.

VIII.    Automatic Procedural Review

The Office of the Provost for Academic Affairs shall conduct an automatic review to ensure no material procedural error in the process occurred. If the Provost Office determines there was a material procedural error then the case shall be remanded to a reconstituted Board for a new hearing.

IX.    Maintenance of Records

All records related to ACC violations shall be maintained by each unit in accordance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act.

X.    Responsible Administrator

The Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs or designee is responsible for the annual and ad hoc review of this policy and its procedures. The Faculty Senate is responsible for the approval of this policy.

Sanctions (Section G.)

The sanctions to be imposed should be commensurate with the offending conduct. Because education may be the most effective and appropriate means of addressing behavior that violates the standards of a university community, the University encourages fashioning sanctions to include an educational element which may help students understand their behavior in the context of the academic community. Although it is inappropriate for the University to try to change a student's convictions, it is appropriate for the University to ask a student to change behavior.

Regrettably, some conduct is so harmful to members of the University community or deleterious to the educational process that more severe sanctions may be required.

The sanctions imposed under these standards do not diminish or replace the penalties which may be invoked under generally applicable civil or criminal laws. Students are reminded that many violations of the standards, including harassment and other discriminatory behavior, may violate various local, State and federal laws and, therefore, also be subject to legal action.

A combination of the sanctions described below may be imposed. The range of potential sanctions is as follows:

  1. Suspension from Specific Course or Activity. The student is removed from a specific course or activity.
  2. Class/Workshop Attendance. The student enrolls in and completes a class that may help improve the student’s understanding of why the conduct engaged in is inappropriate.
  3. Community Service. The student performs an appropriate amount of service that is both beneficial to the community and likely to assist the student in understanding the harm caused by the student’s misconduct.
  4. Restitution. Compensation for loss, damage, or injury to the appropriate party or to the University in the form of service, money or material replacement.
  5. Restriction from Employment at the University. Prohibition or limitation on University employment.
  6. Educational Project. Completion of a project specifically designed to help the student understand why the student’s behavior was inappropriate.
  7. No contact. A directive not to have any contact with a particular person, office or activity.
  8. Disciplinary Reprimand. The student receives a formal reprimand for violating the standards of behavior and a warning that future violations may result in more severe disciplinary action. The student, however, does not lose University privileges.
  9. Disciplinary Probation.A designated period of time during which the student is not in good standing with the University. The terms of probation may involve restrictions on student privileges, such as engaging in any extracurricular activity, running for or holding office in any student group or organization, serving on any University committees or participation on varsity or club sports. The terms of probation may also involve specific behavioral expectations. The appropriate University units will be notified of the student's probationary status.
  10. Suspension in Abeyance. A designated period of time during which the student is not in good standing with the University and is subject to automatic suspension. The student remains enrolled; however, any violation of the Code or other conditions of the suspension, during the period of Suspension in Abeyance will, after a determination of responsibility, result in automatic suspension.
  11. Suspension. The student is temporarily separated from the University for a specified period of time. Conditions may be stipulated for the readmission of a student. When a student is suspended during a term, the student is still responsible for payment of tuition and fees for that term.
  12. Academic Dismissal. The student is permanently dismissed from a school or college of the University.
  13. Expulsion in Abeyance. A designated period of time during which the student is not in good standing with the University and is subject to automatic expulsion. The student remains in enrolled; however, any violation of the Code or other conditions of the expulsion in abeyance, during the Expulsion in Abeyance, will, after a determination of responsibility, result in automatic expulsion.
  14. Expulsion. The student is permanently separated from the University. This penalty may also include the student being barred from University premises and activities. When a student is expelled during a term the student is still responsible for payment of tuition and fees for that term.
  15. Other Disciplinary Actions. In addition to or in place of any of the above sanctions, the student may be subject to other penalties commensurate with the offending conduct. This may include but is not limited to degree and/or transcript actions, such as rescission of a degree, withholding of course credit, loss of credit for an assignment/ exam, assignment of additional work, loss of special privileges, behavioral intervention, or a behavioral contract.

Revised: March 2015